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Thread: Cabela's catalog...

  1. #1

    Default Cabela's catalog...

    Just got the master fishing catalog; came across 2 things I'd like to get your guys' opinion on:
    1. Smelly Jelly, and the like: do they work and increase hook ups for fish like saltwater silvers, freshwater pike? Seems like you can do the same with herring? I was surprised by all the types, varieties, flavors available; with some geared for salmon in the catalog. Would they work for reds in the Kenai? (haven't checked regs, but I'm sure it's quite possible that this kind of stuff is a no-no); I know reds don't typically "bite" in fresh water, but wonder if they would strike at the scent out of reflex or being territorial.

    2. Rod holders/organizers for vehicles; we've got a Suburban and I'd like to store rods overhead up against the interior roof; seen a few setups also in Cabela's, wonder if you guys have any of these and how you like them (when we throw in 6 rods in the rig, they invariably get stuck together, tangled, etc.).

    Thanks,
    Jim P.S. Fish report from Kauai; last 2 weekends we've caught about 600 lbs. of small-med size tuna's (bonitos & yellowfins); these are typically schooling fish and average size for this time of year is 5-30 lbs. Last weekend we caught 12 bonito's between 18-24 lbs; biggest ones some local guys have ever seen; mostly trolling small jigs/tuna hootchies, got some of the 15-20 lb. yellowfins baiting the buoys here; you'd be surprised how hard a 20 lb. tuna strips line from a 50 Shimano Tiagra spooled with 80 lb line. Summertime you do the same but for yellowfins in the 60-200 lb. range.
    Last edited by Big Jim; 01-26-2008 at 18:12. Reason: more info

  2. #2
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    I'd say gel baits would be useful for bottom fish but not so much for shallow predatory fish that feed by site like salmon and pike, although in dingy water it could be useful for salmon that eat fish and such, as sockeye eat plankton primarily it probably wouldn't be effective for sockeye, plus its considered bait by ADF&G and troopers so that rules out the upper kenai.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  3. #3

    Default Powder Monkey....pike....

    interesting observation about the predatory fish (pike); I guess I saw that this last July out at Alexander. That trip (our 3rd out there so far) saw the slowest pike activity; it was like they were lazy & not hungry. I understand there's lots of small ones for them to feed on, but they didn't attack the Johnson's silver minnow at all like the previous 2 years. Also, they were not too interested in the herring either I put out for them on a bobber. I tried whole & cut herring, no matter. Saw as many as years past, but they just were more difficult to motivate. I tried the Johnson's, top water buzzbaits, Mister Twister type spinners, spoons, nothing really got them going too well, although the rubber frogs we got from Cabela's generated more interest, the problem with them was the hookup ratio; not great. They just would not stay hooked up with those, even though we were rigging it correctly. I saw quite a few grab the frog sideways, then just sit there looking up at me, motionless. If I moved too suddenly, they'd drop the lure and swim away, I had to just sit and have a stare-down with that fish; waiting for him/her to swim away, wait, wait, wait, then drive the hook home, with a 50/50 (maybe) hookup ratio. I did try one without the steel leader, and about a 5 lber went nuts on it, but of course broke off soon. Anyways, I love going out there and they taste great if you know how to get the bones out. I'm still puzzled why they were so in-active?????
    Jim

  4. #4
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Jim
    Try using single strand leaders and large pork baits on a single hook no weight in conditions where they are like that. Another deadly technique is to toss Dahlberg Divers on a 9 weight. I have had inactive fish go nuts for this. If you see a pike, cast about 8 to 10 feet ahead and to one side of it. If the pike is just sitting there the splash will get it's curiosity going.
    They will lift up a few inches in the water coloumn, make one 10 to 12 inch strip and stop. The fish will raise a few more inches, strip again and 9 times out of 10 the pike will beat on that fly like a rented mule!!!

  5. #5

    Default Scents

    Smelly Jelly and other commercial scents are good stuff to help draw strikes and eliminate human scent. I use them on lures for Salmon, Halibut, Ling cod, in both fresh and salt water. I personally like the shimp scents or shimp and anise. However, herring and sardine are good too. Try it on reds fishing the lower Kenai.

  6. #6
    Member moose-head's Avatar
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    I am pretty lazy and hate to clean that stuff off of my lures (with lemon scented joy dish soap). My thoughts are that the fish scents will begin to smell rancid after staying on the lures while in storage. If I use one I use anis (black licorice) because I like the smell and it may help to mask human scent.

  7. #7

    Default Thanks guys...

    for the tips. Think I'll give each of them a try. Dave, that sounds great, but I think I'm over my head with trying to cast a fly, as I only first touched a fly rod this last summer for reds; caught lots and will not go back to the baitcaster, but there's no casting for reds, not sure if I even know what to do but my 8 wt. I'm using for reds should work?? I'm game! Where can I get that kind of fly on the Kenai Peninsula or should I order thru Cabela's? What about a leader for the fly? I like the pork idea; are you referring to something you get from Berkely in a jar? Any special color or anything? Why the single strand leader in comparison to the braided ones?
    Thanks again fellas for your advice,
    Jim

  8. #8
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim View Post
    interesting observation about the predatory fish (pike); I guess I saw that this last July out at Alexander. That trip (our 3rd out there so far) saw the slowest pike activity; it was like they were lazy & not hungry. I understand there's lots of small ones for them to feed on, but they didn't attack the Johnson's silver minnow at all like the previous 2 years. Also, they were not too interested in the herring either I put out for them on a bobber. I tried whole & cut herring, no matter. Saw as many as years past, but they just were more difficult to motivate. I tried the Johnson's, top water buzzbaits, Mister Twister type spinners, spoons, nothing really got them going too well, although the rubber frogs we got from Cabela's generated more interest, the problem with them was the hookup ratio; not great. They just would not stay hooked up with those, even though we were rigging it correctly. I saw quite a few grab the frog sideways, then just sit there looking up at me, motionless. If I moved too suddenly, they'd drop the lure and swim away, I had to just sit and have a stare-down with that fish; waiting for him/her to swim away, wait, wait, wait, then drive the hook home, with a 50/50 (maybe) hookup ratio. I did try one without the steel leader, and about a 5 lber went nuts on it, but of course broke off soon. Anyways, I love going out there and they taste great if you know how to get the bones out. I'm still puzzled why they were so in-active?????
    Jim
    Clearly the fish were in a negative mood, when they are negative and not feeding you have 2 choices, go smaller and slower (which is why I fly fish) or go huge and on top of their head (which will make them run or attack). In july it is usually hot, and pike don't really like hot water, in most books I read on pike fishing it says to fish deep in the summer because the pike are actively feeding deep as they are a cold water fish. The frogs may have worked because I assume you fished them slow with the frogs. I think pike feed primarily by lateral line and eyesight as I have never done well with herring under a bobber I have done well casting an unweighted herring and swimming it back to the boat very slowly, and being very patient, also I've done well on really light jigs with short rubber worms in purple and black as well as bunny flies in black, and on top water flys kicking up a lot of water. I feel that pike are very lazy and will take a target of opportunity and it takes very aggressive fish to get them to come to faster presentations. Furthermore in many pike lakes in SC they eat primarily dragon fly nymphs and leaches which explains why rubber worms and bunny flies work well for them, match the hatch.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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