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Thread: Boning Caribou

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    Default Boning Caribou

    Is it better to quarter caribou and hang the quarters? or to bone out the caribou where it falls? I have a friend who is an elk guide in Colorado and he bones everything out where it falls without even gutting it.

  2. #2
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    Default

    In short, do whatever makes it easier for you to get the meat back to camp or your pick up point.
    Tennessee

  3. #3

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    Along the lines of what Randy sezz, do whatever is necessary. But given my choice and the circumstances, I really prefer the quartering. It's sure a lot easier to butcher back at home with the bones still in place, and hanging goes a lot better too.

  4. #4

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    I think it would cost too much to fly it home quartered to the lower 48 so it will have to be boned either in camp or in Kotz. We will be on a float hunt.

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    Default boning

    I have done it both ways. The meat seems to be better when the bones are left in to hang. Its my understanding that it helps with the enzymes in the meat. (dont know) Hang it every night (if possible) or keep a good air flow around it. When you get back to Kotz. bone it out if needed for $$ savings in shipping. We left the bones in last year and shipped via NAC to Los Anchorage and hung it for another 5 days (total of 10)--------GREAT meat. I like it better than moose.

    RC

  6. #6
    Member AKMarmot's Avatar
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    Default boning to soon

    I guess the only concern I would have is that the sooner you bone it the sooner you will have to process it in some way. I don't know if you plan on processing it in Anch but if you don't you should think about freezing or chilling because withou it there would be a decent chance for bone sour by the time you make back home.
    Besides on a NAC back haul from Kotz to Anch the charge for the bone weight it minimal, especailly in comparision to losing it.
    I would leave it on the bone until you had to take it on the commercial flight out of AK & then have arrangements for it to be cooled until check in.
    It possible you already were planning on this just couldn't tell from you post.

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    Currently, in most GMU's in Alaska, its a moot point. You are reguired to keep the quarters on caribou and moose on the bone and in some areas, the rib meat until you are out of the field. There are a few areas its not required but not many. We usually quarter it without gutting it. Fish and Game has a decent video about it. It also keeps the meat better since there is less surface area to spoil while waiting for the pick up flight.

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    Member Matt's Avatar
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    If you shoot a caribou early in your hunt and you won't be picked up for a few days, then by all means leave the meat on the bones and hang it up so the meat can get the air circulation that it needs and age (crust).

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    As said already, leave it on the bone if at all possible. Much easier to handle and carry. When you bone it out you expose more meat surface area to bacteria. Plus a heavy sack of boned out meat is like a great sack of JELLO, hard to tie down, the meat and sack will squirt out and come unsecured. With the meat on the bone you can use the bone and tie the game bag cord around the end and take some strain off your game bags. I have been unable to get boned out meat to crust and it seems to continue to leak more blood and fluids. As said check the regs for the GMU you are going to be hunting in. The meat in the first photo was boned to get the bull off a hill. The meat in the second photo left on the bone. The meat from the bull left on the bone was clearly better tasting.



    Steve

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill S. View Post
    Currently, in most GMU's in Alaska, its a moot point. You are reguired to keep the quarters on caribou and moose on the bone and in some areas, the rib meat until you are out of the field. There are a few areas its not required but not many. We usually quarter it without gutting it. Fish and Game has a decent video about it. It also keeps the meat better since there is less surface area to spoil while waiting for the pick up flight.
    I should have put a BOG proposal to end the rib meat on the bone requirement! What a silly requirement! Whats next Backstrap on the bone? When are they going to start making you haul the whole caribou out on your back?

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    Thumbs up Meat on the bone

    Mike:

    Its very important to read your regs regarding meat for GMU 23. All caribou must come to a state maintained air strip (Kotz or any village) on the bone. This was changes 2 years ago due to some waste issues that have now corrected themselves. After you arrive in a village or Kotz you can de-bone you meat for packaging but donít make the mistake of doing it in the field as it will cost you dearly. Check out the AF&G web site to catch up on all of the regs and this will allow you to have a great hunt.

    Useful web sites that will assist your hunt planning.
    Hunting tag info http://www.adfg.state.ak.us/
    http://www.wc.adfg.state.ak.us/index...fg=unit23.main


    Walt
    Northwest Alaska Back Country Rentals
    Your best bet in rafts, canoes and camp rentals
    Kotzebue, Alaska
    www.northwestalaska.com

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Is it just me or was anyone else nervous to open a thread titled "boning Caribou" at work? I know it is cold and dark up north and some of you bush living fellows may get lonely out on the trap lines for weeks at a time...

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    Member MNViking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Is it just me or was anyone else nervous to open a thread titled "boning Caribou" at work? I know it is cold and dark up north and some of you bush living fellows may get lonely out on the trap lines for weeks at a time...
    It made it through the military filter so I figured why not.
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

  14. #14

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    Right up there with all us muzzleloaders talking about our round balls.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Right up there with all us muzzleloaders talking about our round balls.
    I have heard about that, apparently if you have mishapen balls you cant shoot straight!

  16. #16
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Meat on the bone

    Michael,

    I agree with much of what has been written here. The reason the hunting regulations require meat to be left on the bone is because it keeps better in the field that way. When you remove the bones, you open a large wound channel in the quarter, which continues to leak fluid for your entire hunt. You also make it impossible to hang it without it balling up in the bottom of the bag. This makes it difficult for the meat to properly glaze over and fosters bacterial growth, which hastens spoilage.

    Properly done, meat should be left on the bone and hanged in camp. When you hang it, bag it first to keep flies off, then tie your rope around the shank bone and loop it over your meat pole. Then pull the bag material away from the meat, so it doesn't stick to the quarter. The idea is to keep the meat cool, clean, and dry to the touch.

    I might also add that you should avoid using a saw to remove quarters from an animal. The saw leaves you with sharp edges of bone that can easily cut your game bags and admit flies to the meat inside. Instead, use your knife to sever the ligaments and tendons that hold the quarter to the pelvis, and the lower leg to the rest of the quarter. You can even remove the ribs without sawing them free, but it takes more time.

    Hope it helps!

    -Mike
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