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Thread: 16 foot large enough for Deep Creek?

  1. #1
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    Default 16 foot large enough for Deep Creek?

    I have a 16' aluminum v hull boat with a 25 horse outboard. I have only used it on lakes so far but am wondering about the possibility of launching it at Deep Creek. I am planning on putting a 50 horse on it after shopping the boat show coming up.

    Can anyone tell me if my boat is sufficient for using out of Deep Creek?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    If the weather is good sure, if it turns sour, definately not.

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    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    Your boat will do fine. As was previously stated just keep an eye on the weather is all.. I have fished it in everything from a 14' zodiac to my 22' north river. Common sense goes along way in the inlet. Like i say. When in doubt it is time to head for the beach. Otherwise kick back and catch some butts
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

  4. #4

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    What kind of boat do you have? More importantly, does it have a sufficient "v"? I've seen Zodiacs out there, small ones, but they don't sink even if flooded. Lots of small aluminum boats will. Also, make sure you have a way to get LOTS of water out of the boat quickly, even being prepared for that at launch time. We had a 16' Almar lite w/35 hp. We took it out there on a beautiful day, pretty calm. Biggest issue was taking lots of water over the transom on the tractor launch, but having a bilge pump took care of that.
    We had an open type transom cutout on that boat, no splash well or tray of any type. After that day, I had the welding shop in Sterling weld a splash well compartment around the motor area and the top of the new well was the same as the gunnel height. (Hey, if you take water over the gunnels, all bets off!). As said, be prepared to run quickly, also I'd strongly recommend a small kicker (with it's own fuel supply, separate from the main motor's supply) as a backup. The tide current can get you going the wrong way in a hurry should you have main motor problems. I don't want to dampen your enthusiasm, but I've been out on the inlet sport & commercial fishing enough over the years to see that it demands caution & respect, even though some days are mirror flat and windless. Be prepared for any event, have adequate communications (water resistant), let someone know where you are, and very importantly, catch lots of fish!
    Jim
    PS----seems like the best small boat for the inlet would be a Klamath or Bayrunner, as they have pretty high bows; the guy we charter with said that in the old days, all they ran were 18' Bayrunners with twin 50's. Very wet, but capable & safe enough to have paying customers.
    Last edited by Big Jim; 01-26-2008 at 10:14. Reason: Additional information

  5. #5

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    Pay a lot of attention to the weather and marine reports.

  6. #6
    Member SEEBLAZE's Avatar
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    Cliffking,

    As every one mentioned below listen to the marine weather reports, if you don't have a splash well be very careful. I have a 20' FishRite thats totally open. I have taken waves into the back of the splash well, and if I didn't have the slpash well I would have been in trouble. Even with a bilge pump. Most of the guides and their clients look at me like I'm crazey, but I always beat them back with a limit in my boat. I launch as soon as the tractor launch (Anchor Point) and I'm usually back at camp with a limit of 8 buts by 10:30, noon being the lastest. With time to still hit the anchor river for kings. Ever looking for another boat to head out with from Anchor Point let me know.

    Chris

  7. #7

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    You're probably already aware of this, but regardless of how small of a boat you take out on the water, you're required to have (and should have, regardless) the necessary flares, PFDs, boat registration, etc. plus of course a radio and anchor. The first time I was ever boarded by Coast Guard was on a 16-ft. inflatable out of Deep Creek. Water was extremely rough. I had all the required equipment and got checked out fine. When they left I puked. I think it was the rough water, but I can't be sure

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    Member SEEBLAZE's Avatar
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    Yes all safety equipment is also a must, good point skydiver

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    Default Bayrunner

    Back in the late 70's I used to run a 16ft Bayrunner out of Deep Creek. We would put in at high tide and fish for salmon and when slack tide started we fish for halibut. We used a bouy to pull our anchor which can be a challenge but considering all things it was a lot of fun. We had one trip where we caught a 268 pound halibut and had to kill it with a fishing knife. We had for got the harpon, hammer ,gun, and fish club. After we subdued the fish we had to tie it off to the side of the boat to get it back to shore.

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    Captaindd,

    Wow a 268lb halibut in a 16' boat. With no gun, harpoon only armed with a fillet knife. That must have been a exerience, I would have love to been a fly on the boat for that one.

  11. #11

    Default On good days

    On good days I ran my 14' inflatable out there all the time, caught a 150# halibut once by my self, no one wanted to go. So off I went, had a .22 which was a bad idea to shot it with, went straight back down. Then didn't stick harpon thru the first time, and she went staright back down. After the 3rd time reels up from 100' of water I got it right, but boy was I pooped. Then I had to get it in the boat!

  12. #12
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    16ft should not be a problem, my dad I fished out of there for 20yrs with his 16ft achilles and then his 14ft. one time in the 14ft we had 3 people, 3 halibut rods, tackle box, fuel tank and landed a 150#r and a 80#r and a 50#r and 3 that were about 20#s thank god the sees didn't get really bad or it would have been a scarey ride back. just watch the wind and the sea's and u will be fine

  13. #13
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    Default Anchors, kickers, mechanics????????????

    Been running everyones advice through my head over an over. Thank you to everyone.

    I am thinking a ton about anchoring. What is the average depth of water fished in the inlet out of deep creek? And how long of an anchor rope and how heavy an anchor should I use? I know the coast guard recommends a 7 to 1 anchor line to water depth, but if I am fishing in 130 to 230 foot of water, I would need over a 1000 foot of line for that. And I have been reading about using anchor buoys for retrieving anchors, versus winches or the old fashioned heave-ho by hand. I don't want to clutter the boat with a lot of unnecessary gear. But I also do not want to get caught out on open water without the tools I will need to fish safely. I like to be a minimalist, but is it realistic to pull an anchor up by hand out there? Or should I look more into the buoys?

    Also, a lot of people I have talked to warn me not to go out without a back up motor (kicker) in case my motor should fail. I cant see putting a second motor in the transom of my little 16 foot boat no matter how small. I own an electric trolling motor with 55 lbs of thrust, enough for a 24 foot much heavier boat. Is this an unrealistic thread of thought to consider this reliable in the inlet?

    And last but not least, can anyone recommend a good place to take my motor to this spring for a full check up, tune up and anything else it might need?

  14. #14
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    i would think 300ft. of anchor rope would be good with 20ft. of chain and a 15lb anchor when we fished out there we would fish in water no more then 180ft. deep average was 150ft. as for retrieving your anchor get a bouy and save your arms

  15. #15
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I have zero ocean experience on my personal floation devices. But I have quite a bit of time on large reservoirs (fort peck MT). When the big motor pukes on me. The trolling motor batteries do almost nothing for me if the wind is up. Most of the time we fishin within 50 feet of the bank - so the trolling motor gets us to shore where we wait for help. Or we just jump in the lake and swim to shore pulling the boat. Don't think that is a good option for the ocean.

  16. #16
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    Default Kicker motor

    Man, never ever EVER go out in the salt with only one motor, I've got a 17 foot fish&ski with a F75 yamaha (good motor BTW) and a high thrust 8 HP.

    The transom is a little crowded but its well worth it, if you dont have enough room to tiller steer the kicker you can lock it down straight and use the main motor to steer.

    I've had 3 occasions where I had to use the kicker to get me back in PWS, all of them fuel related, on a windy day even the 8 HP has to work to push me against it. Especially if I have the canopy cabin up (almost all the time).
    An electric trolling motor isnt going to do dammit against a 15 knot headwind.

  17. #17
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    Default thanks

    I will look into getting a small kicker then. What is the smallest that would be adequate to push the boat against the current of the inlet?

  18. #18

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    For a my 16" I run a 3.5...that`s as small as I could go (boat loaded weighs 1,500#s) and fight the wind and current...a 4 would do better. It`s up to you...4-6 horse will be fine though.

  19. #19

    Default No 2 days alike.

    If the tide is going to drop 10 foot and no wind a 8hp would move ya, but if the tide is going to drop 25 feet with a 15k head wind and going against the tide your hosed. It can run some 14 mph, ouch.
    One good running motor will be fine, I have ran one since 1975 and got towed once, up keep is an important as common smarts.

  20. #20

    Default Oh largest but caught out of Deep Creek was 400+

    in 40 feet, 100 feet will produce butt easy a couplle miles out at most. They will hang at the mouth and pick up salmon coming back out of the river, same for the Kenai River a few 100 yards out.
    Forget dooms day and go fishing!
    300 foot of rope is a safe bet for 100 feet of water

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