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Thread: Remote Living

  1. #1
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    Default Remote Living

    Hi, looking for some assistance! I have always been drawn to living in my cabin in the mountains or up in alaska. I keep looking for web sites and forums but only find the survival sites. Does anyone have another place to
    look. I enjoy reading the backwoods home mag/web site, but still looking for more info. I have read one mans wilderness odessy, and that is the
    stuff I am looking for.. Thanks for your help.

  2. #2
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    Default Welcome Buck!

    Welcome Buck!

    So you found this site, now you want us to provide links to other sites so you can leave us again? Not so fast

    Buck, your goal is admirable, all it takes is the will to do it, and a little bit of money. Yes, being monetarily independant actually helps a lot! I ain't, yet I live a pretty darn good life. At least in my humble opinion. At the end of the day, it's my good health that I appreciate more than a cozy bank account, that's the god honest truth!

    Living in your cabin in "them thar hills" sounds romantic, but it does take some source of income to sustain that life style. There are some neat ways to get your foot in the door.

    Good luck to you!

    Gord
    "He was a man of no patience, you could see it in him. That was a notch against him. In the wild country, a body needs patience".

  3. #3
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    Default Remote living...

    I can understand your thinking about wanting to live remote.I remember when I flew into Whitefish lake Alaska for a bow moose hunt.I spent 14 days floating and hunting the outlet river.When the Beaver came in to pick me up, I actually felt like someone ripped my heart out.Some of us were made for that life.I live secluded now, have to sled up and down the mt all winter,have bear moose and deer all summer as neighbors, but there is something about getting away from it all.I have several acres in remote(fly-in" alaska, but seems the wife likes to have access to Wal-Mart GR

  4. #4
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    Default

    Thanks for the note, my wife is partial to walmart too, however she is willing to let me have my dream too. Hopefully soon I will by my little
    chunk of my dream and start working on putting up my cabin. Also trying to make sure I dont miss something important that I havn't put in my plans

  5. #5
    Member 1stimestar's Avatar
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    Default

    Well if you do get to that remote cabin in the wild, you will NEED those survival skills. So don't think they are a waste.
    Alaska, the Madness; Bloggity Stories of the North
    http://cloud9doula.wordpress.com/

    Does this shotgun make my butt look big?

  6. #6
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    Default Cabin ..

    Something I would like to say on a cabin.There are more creatures than you looking for a nice warm place to winter.Make sure you vermin proof your cabin underside with 1/4 inch wire cloth.You'll be glad you did.GR

  7. #7
    Member trapperrick's Avatar
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    Default

    Man do I ever feel you! I think I'm Dick Proneke reincarnated, LOL. I figure I'll have to work in Los Anchorage for a year to find the land, fell the logs, design everything and put a little back for taxes and essentials that I can't get in the bush. I have 4 houses here in Georgia and a business. I hate it. The wife is the one that's so hung up on material things and feeling the overwhelming need to make all she can for our retirement. I want to get out there while I'm still able to haul a moose quarter over a mountain and drag a 200 lb halibut into the boat. I told her I'm moving to Alaska to live and I'm doing it this coming spring; no more putting it off and no compromises. I don't think she'll be coming with me. I can live with that.

  8. #8
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Research

    I feel your emotion as I did the same thing back in 99. Quit the job, did the teachers job fair in Anchorage, sold everything I had except what fit into the truck and moved.

    Now, before you make the move you should do a lot of research. I came up with nothing but a few belongings and a fat Labrador. You have a family and it is going to be a lot harder without a job. Key issue, a job. Things are very expensive up here and not getting cheaper. Without knowledge of the state and a job, you are looking at a tough haul.

    Unless you buy a piece of land from someone there is no homesteading up here any more. You need land and resources for building. Our winters are harsh and you will have to truck, fly or haul in everything yourself. I live in the 10th largest city in Alaska. Even people from Valdez will drive the 325 miles to Anchorage to buy building materials for larger jobs.

    With the above information, start doing some research. First thing should be a job.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  9. #9
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    Default Land of milk and honey

    Well, maybe not so much the milk part.....since the dairy closed last year. All you really need is a bag of rice and a dream. Especially here in Eagle River where we like to live "off the fat of the land" Come on up and you'll be fine.

    We found our homestead nestled in the birch along the banks of the mighty Eagle River in this valley where we live amongst the majestic brown bear and noble moose. The river teems with fresh, wild, organic protein and provides our subsistence (along with the Super Walmart under construction).

    During the summer, the hillsides are covered in edible berries and wild herbs. In the fall, with the utmost respect to the game, we choose to kill only the fattest of the beasts to fill our cache. Acres of conifer and hardwood provide the fuel we use to heat our humble adobe (and methane from Beluga).

  10. #10
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    Default my view

    I drove up in 1984 . I've spent my time in the bush , too much time 45 minutes from Fairbanks (wife and kid) and now kick around Tok . If I weren't so old I'd head back to Northern Minneota where I started and where you fish and hunt out your back door without all the rules and regulations . There are too many foreigners , too many granola's , too many old hippies and the Feds or natives have 90 plus % of what is . Mat-Su and the Kenai are full of Outside hustlers , Anchorage is another Seattle and Fairbanks isn't too far behind . I spend too much time dreaming about the second coming of Joe Vogler . It's a tough place where you hustle for $$ during the short bit of time you should be fishing . This country is the good looking woman who continually kicks your behind but you can't leave because she's so **** good looking . I would guess for every 2,000 that have headed up here to live the bush life maybe one has played it out as planned , maybe less . So , you guys from the land of lincoln and peach heaven , have your pockets full of $$$$ , have a usable trade under your belt and leave your woman problems behind . Don't sell the farm quite yet .

  11. #11

    Default

    You can buy my property if you want. Its on a lake teeming with fish and in the mountains there are moose, sheep, caribou and bear. You would have to build a new cabin and have some supplies shipped in but there is a village only 40 miles away, just like Proenekke. But you have millions of acres of wilderness around you. And I have the single last parcel in the Brooks range for sale.

    http://www.alaska-land.com/photogall...ild%20Lake.htm

  12. #12

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    Robert Fox has another lot for sale in wild lake listed on his website.

  13. #13
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    I know of land for sale in 4 different places in the Brooks Range. one 160 acre, two 40 acre etc. Nobody owns the LAST place for sale.

  14. #14
    Member Bushpilot's Avatar
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    Default

    If you're looking for some more off the beaten path land, you might want to check this site out.
    http://www.landinalaska.com/
    I refuse to tiptoe through life, only to arrive safely at death.


    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants."

    Thomas Jefferson

  15. #15
    Member mit's Avatar
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    Default living off the land

    Couple of sayings I like.



    It takes a lot of money to live off the land.

    When your living off the land; after awhile the land don't taste so good
    Tim

  16. #16

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    Well where are these "mystical" other places for sale?

  17. #17

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    That other place was sold last March. The site needs serious updating.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Koyukuk View Post
    Well where are these "mystical" other places for sale?
    160 acres- at Hunt's Fork.
    40 acres- north of Chandler Lake.
    40 acres- (foothills on north slope central Brooks Range)
    Two of the 3 in Gates of the Arctic National Park
    one family has these: free and clear title just conveyed last year. If you have a boatload of money contact me for more info.

  19. #19

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    These are probably owned by folks in Anaktuvuk Pass. I spoke to some there who owned property at Hunt Fork. The North is tough because there is no wood to heat a woodstove.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by logman View Post
    I drove up in 1984 . I've spent my time in the bush , too much time 45 minutes from Fairbanks (wife and kid) and now kick around Tok . If I weren't so old I'd head back to Northern Minneota where I started and where you fish and hunt out your back door without all the rules and regulations . There are too many foreigners , too many granola's , too many old hippies and the Feds or natives have 90 plus % of what is . Mat-Su and the Kenai are full of Outside hustlers , Anchorage is another Seattle and Fairbanks isn't too far behind . I spend too much time dreaming about the second coming of Joe Vogler . It's a tough place where you hustle for $$ during the short bit of time you should be fishing . This country is the good looking woman who continually kicks your behind but you can't leave because she's so **** good looking . I would guess for every 2,000 that have headed up here to live the bush life maybe one has played it out as planned , maybe less . So , you guys from the land of lincoln and peach heaven , have your pockets full of $$$$ , have a usable trade under your belt and leave your woman problems behind . Don't sell the farm quite yet .
    This and that from Daveinthebush bout says it all. Romance and reality,,,,or that, that one is running from. I do love that part of "It takes a lot of money to live off of the land". Been there and done it.
    Mudbug

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