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Thread: Goat Hunting

  1. #1

    Default Goat Hunting

    Lots of talk in many forums about sheep hunting. Not much on Goat hunting. Are goats not hunted as much?

    I have never goat hunted, but I find it intriguing, and from the little I know, the terrain and challenge seems every bit as hard as sheep hunting.

    Put in for a draw tag this year. Will have to see how it goes.....

    Would like to hear more about goat hunting: gear, methods, etc.

  2. #2

    Default Here is a book that says a lot.

    You might want to read "The Mountain Goat Challenge" by Ace Sommerfeld. It's a pretty good read. The Outdoor Directory carries it.

  3. #3
    Member Ripper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1911-MW View Post
    Lots of talk in many forums about sheep hunting. Not much on Goat hunting. Are goats not hunted as much?
    Kind of interesting, isn't it? I've often wondered the same thing. I think it comes down to the fact that a trophy goat just isn't as impressive as a trophy ram on the wall to most people. Add that to the fact that the terrain is often much more difficult, and I think those are the main reasons folks don't pursue the goats as much.

    The flipside of this is that in my opinion a trophy moose or caribou is more impressive than a ram, yet the ram is the more highly prized trophy. I guess some folks just think moose and caribou are too "easy". At least that is my take.

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    Default goats

    1911----I am sure there will be alot of dissagreement but I belieive that goat hunting is alot harder that sheep but there is a huge sheep following, so maybe I'm missing something.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by ltsryd View Post
    You might want to read "The Mountain Goat Challenge" by Ace Sommerfeld. It's a pretty good read. The Outdoor Directory carries it.

    It is on my list to get!

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by xmohuntr View Post
    1911----I am sure there will be alot of dissagreement but I belieive that goat hunting is alot harder that sheep but there is a huge sheep following, so maybe I'm missing something.
    That was my take as well. Terrain seems harder and from the little, let me stress little, I have heard goats hare harder to kill.

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    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xmohuntr View Post
    so maybe I'm missing something.
    You are missing something. Two things actually. The first is that goats seem to be far less easily spooked than sheep. The second is that nearly every goat you see is a legally huntable animal. That is not the case with sheep. I also think goats tend to move around less than sheep and will often stay in a relatively small area for several days. That happens less frequently with sheep.

  8. #8
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    spot on, Chisana.

    Goats typically come from areas with less predictable weather, too.
    Sheep aren't "easy" in that regard, but the weather is often far more tolerable/huntable/flyable.

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    I've never hunted either.
    Never really had a desire until the last year or two.
    BUT, I have to say I'm more drawn to the goat than the sheep. I like the looks of the animal more.
    Put in for 3 tags for each this year so we'll see if I become a goat or a sheep hunter or neither this year :-)
    Then I'll have to decide recurve or traditional muzzleloader.....
    Even without tags I intend to spend more time looking at them this year.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  10. #10
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    I have to agree with some of what has been said. It also depends on where you are hunting and the time of year. The weather really sucks in those late October Goat hunts but usually pretty mild in the August Sheep hunts (not always, but most of the time). Goats usually live in much harder & dangerous terrain (both for animal as well as hunter). Both are very hard to hunt and both are excellent trophies. My Goat hunt this fall was "easier" then most but still kicked my butt big time. I guess there are too many variables with both to give them a fair comparison. Here is mine from this fall:
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    sheep taste better than goats, right?
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Goats are wonderful animals to hunt IMO and their home terrain is most often breathtaking.

    I think the difference is that legal goats are "easy" to find, which has been mentioned already. The challenge in goat hunting is the terrain itself. Getting into a position that allows the hunter to kill the goat in a place where it can be retrieved safely.
    Where sheep country is the high meadows and slopes that lead into the vertical. Goat country IS the vertical.

    I'm no expert, having killed but 1 billy, but it was an awesome, if only mildly life threatening experience. I look forward to hunting goats again.

  13. #13

    Default toughest animal

    I goat hunt every year and love it. I am in awe of how tough they are. Just compare them to our brown bears. The goat will take a hit from a 338 that would send a brown bear rolling and roaring, and barely flinch. They spend all winter in the most extreme environment fighting heavy snows, extreme cold, avalanches, terrible winds, and meager food sources, while a brown bear wakes from a long snooze in a warm den only to be greeted with lush grass, berries, and spawning fish. While some would consider goats the poor mans sheep, I respect the goat beyond all other alaskan game, and there is no better trophy then a large goat hide taken in late fall.

  14. #14

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    What kind of loads are people using for these tough guys? Sounds like bullet choice is key.....

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    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1911-MW View Post
    What kind of loads are people using for these tough guys? Sounds like bullet choice is key.....
    I shot my goat last year with a 30-06 using a 180 grain Norma Oryx bullet. Muzzle velocity was about 2600 fps and the range was just under 150 yards. I had a one shot kill and the heart was in three pieces. The 180 gave full penetration. I would say any cartridge from 6.5x55 on up to the 300 magnums would be fine for goats. As with any animal placement of the first shot makes all the difference. An animal shot in the arse with a 375 is still shot in the arse.

  16. #16

    Default Goat hunting

    Goat hunting is my real obsession. Goat hunting and sheep hunting are very dissimilar activites, despite the fact that both animals live up high. They are both great hunts. I personally think they are both great trophies. There isn't much that can compare the to beautiful coat on a long, shaggy goat.

  17. #17
    Member JamesMac's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Goat hunt

    I went on my first goat hunt in 2007 and I loved it! Youíre in beautiful steep country chasing an animal that in my opinion is beautiful, very tough and a most worthy opponent.

    I saw goats in places that were simply impossible for people to get to (unaided by helicopters anyway). Aside from walking into your crosshair this might be some of the best places to watch them. I saw a goat walk out in what appeared to be a near vertical slope 3k+ feet in elevation; there must have been some minor sort of grove in the earth for footing? Then when he had gone as far as he could, he tried repeatedly to turn around and exit the way he came in. Only he could not simply turn around, no footing! He literally walked backwards a few feet then jumped in the air and spun 180 degrees and landed back in that small grove. He next walked a few yards as though he would walk back to some secure ground, but no he bedded down and took a nap! Unbelievable!

    I used a Winchester M70 in .338 Win Magnum with Remington 225 grain swift a frame ammo on this trip. The first shot on my goat was out around 250 yards. I hit him high in the shoulder and he didnít budge! Then he started running and my second shot missed. So we started running after him when he popped up over the next ridge I stopped and shot my third round this time hitting him in the gut. He started to run again and when he appeared the third time I hit him directly in the center of his spine. This put him down for good. What a tough animal!

    As we approached my goat I was absolutely impressed with the size and appearance of this spectacular trophy. They are built impressively, all muscle and very blocky. Their hoofs are hard and sharp around the edges and soft on the underside this along with their awesome physical stature gives one an immediate understanding for there unique climbing ability.

    In appearance and temperament they are a contradiction of sorts. He carries a beautiful thick lush white coat. This gives them a warm soft almost approachable appearance. However once you get closer you see the dark eyes and dark thick dagger like horns and you realize that this is no timid animal, he means business and is capable of dishing out some out. My goat had two sets of holes on both left and right sides of his chest. While my guide skinned him out almost to cups worth of yellow puss came out of these holes. We measured up his own horns against these holes in his cape and they were dam close. Apparently he had been gorged in previous fighting.

    I will defiantly go goat hunting again!

  18. #18
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    Default This is my goat year

    I have hunted goats 3 years and have yet to get one, had one that was shot twice with a 338 WM dive off a cliff into a glacier and could not get to it. This year is my year, to get my beautiful white goat. I dont know where or if I have to do it alone, but it will get done.

    Terry

  19. #19
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    Thumbs up good books

    i would recommend "a beast the color of winter" by chadwick, and i have on order a book on goats written by two of the top bio's in the field "Mountain Goats: Ecology, Behavior, and Conservation of an Alpine Ungulate"
    by Marco Festa-Bianchet and Steeve D. Cote.
    these guys did a 16 year study on goats in alberta, and their findings may change the way goats are managed here in alaska.
    i am really looking forward to reading it!
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by homerdave View Post
    i would recommend "a beast the color of winter" by chadwick
    I recommend that title also Dave.

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