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Thread: What to do with the meat in bear country???

  1. #1
    Member Dusty's Avatar
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    Default What to do with the meat in bear country???

    I am gonna go ahead and run the risk of sounding stupid here, but here it goes...

    I am planning float hunt for moose and after doing a lot of research on the area I want to hunt I have a huge question... After you kill a moose and get it to your raft, and proceed on down the river on your merry way.... What in the heck do you do with the meat at night while you are sleeping? The area I am planning to hunt is big bear country and after studying topographical maps, arial photos and satalite images I am pretty sure that there are no trees to hang the meat in overnight. SO, What do you do with it while you are sleeping so the bears dont bother it????
    [/SIGPIC]As free as ashes in the wind . . . .

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    Sleep far enough from it so a bear doesn't mistake you for a hind quarter I'm sure some others will have better advice than this but thats what I would do.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Hang the meat and surround it with an electric bear fence. (I've never used one of the electric fences, but many members here speak highly of them. Do a search of the forums and you'll find lots of reviews of particular models and even instructions for building your own.)

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    Way better idea than mine

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    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Or just get a bunch of those bear attack books and let your partner(s) read them all before the trip. You'll have no problems with them staying up all night and being able to keep an eye on the meat while listening for bears.

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    Alaska is bear country. You just do whatever it takes to keep it cool and dry and definitely DON'T leave it in the raft at night! You don't want the bear to eat your meat AND your raft! I have cut and piled brush and and laid the bagged meat on the brush to help circulation and then thrown a tarp over it to keep the rain off, helps keep the scent down some too I think. I have laid bagged caribou meat out in rock fields thus doing the same thing. Done the same kind of things with sheep meat in bear country on 2-4 day hikes out.

    You can urinate around the area of the meat area also. I have heard of guys putting the meat in contractor bags and sticking it in the river all night too.

    So, do the normal meat care stuff and say a prayer over it and then get some sleep! If a bear wants it bad enough he's gonna get it. It's all part of the great adventure! Hope you have a great trip!
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    I agree with SNYD, that's what I do as well. Definately do not leave the meat on the raft. And keep blood off the raft if possiable. Better to loose the meat than the raft. We've never had any problems at night, our problems have all come during the day. Bears waiting in the middle of the river, they could smell the bloody meat. So keep a gun handi. Also wolves following us down river, and trying to come in when we stopped for lunch.
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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default Bears...

    Keep the raft clean by rinsing it off regularly. I have heard bears love the taste of rafts. Keeping meat far from camp (downwind) is definately a good idea. Do the same with your cook area. Bear bells would be good to alert you if something was on the meat (or other gear). I attach them to many of my bags and the Ally pack canoe we use. Very handy and a cheap way of alerting you of night time guest. For fences, I am looking at getting one myself. Some are lighter than others. Some are better for gravel river bars as the regular models I am told have trouble getting a good ground in gravel. That is the poly fence that electrobearguard sells. I like the fact that the UDAP model is only 4 lbs. I have looked at these two brands.

    http://www.electrobearguard.com/Product.html

    http://www.udap.com/bearshock.htm

    http://www.rei.com/product/721998?vcat=REI_SEARCH
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    One of the best things to do is to pee on or around everything. We camped out north of lake louise and left camp set up for weeks knowing there was a brownie in the area while we came back to town for work and everytime we left camp we pee'd on or around everything except one time we didn't pee on the raft like we normally due and came back to raft with holes everywhere luckly we had a spare raft. that bear could have eat'in all the food and the tent but for some reason the smell of human pee detour's them away.

    p.s. no we don't pee on our food we keep it in containiers in the tent and pee all around the tent.

  10. #10
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Smile Pee...

    I would be willing to bet more people use the pee trick than would be willing to admit to it. Animals in the wild mark their territory that way. Why shouldn't we?
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  11. #11

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    Cache the meat near the river and a little ways from your camp, keeping it near the water will keep it cool. When I did my moose float 2 years ago we would cache the meat on the other side of the river directly across from our camp, that way when we got up we could check it and still be able to do something about it if a bear was on it. Urinating around the meat surely can't hurt and an electric fence is something i've been wanting to try. Good luck!

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    Member aktoklat's Avatar
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    Default Great Advice

    Keep it at a distance, cover it and let it breath, Pee around the perimeter, leave a pair of sweaty undergarments around it, sprinkle red pepper around the bags, electronic shocker sounds good if practical. Leave a portable radio on at night for noise distracting, etc. Like posted if a bear wants it bad enough you will lose it. Next morning approach cautiously to the cache. Good luck!

  13. #13

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    What about if you are backpack hunting, ie sheep and goat hunting.

    You can't afford to haul extra weight, I guess the pee trick is probably your best bet....

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    Member chrisWillh's Avatar
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    This months Field and Stream had an interesting idea that I had never thought of. In addition to hanging the meat at the edge of camp or a short distance away where you can still see it, they recommend hanging trail tape from the meat poles it increase visibility. Not sure how this will help you keep bears away though, might help you see them at your meat poles.
    Chris Willhoite

  15. #15

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    I'd do what Perry said above. The most important thing for you to worry about is keeping your meat in good shape (fresh) and thats really about all you can do. The tips about keeping the meat away from the raft are good, but you also might want to bring some bleach (not a gallon but enough to make a good diluted mixture) and a spray bottle that you can mix with river water and spray the raft down after you wipe it free of blood each night. That raft is your most important piece of gear and you dont want bears chewing on it. A couple guides I know that spend a lot of time floating for moose in big brownie country have told me that one of the best bear deterrents for protecting camp and meat is to apply ammonia to the area. Soak rags, spray it , whatever. The strong smell that ammonia and bleach puts out reaks havoc on a bears senses, they dont like it! Other than that I say make sure you meat is visible from a distance so you can see whats going on and not walk into a nightmarish situation, things like clip on bells will also let you know that something is eating your meat, be creative and be careful.

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    Default Meat placement

    A friend of mine learned this one two years ago. His group had taken a moose early in a week long hunt. Weather wasn't too bad so they hung it on a meat pole with a tarp over the top and went back to hunting. Later that week a grizz snuck in and grabbed the first thing he could get from under the tarp and buggered off. Guess what he got...that's right, straps and hind quarter...Moral of the story...keep the tasty vittles on the interior of the pile (however you choose to do it) so that if some snatching does occur, they take the less than prime cuts...and pray bears don't know the difference

  17. #17
    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AkHunter45 View Post
    Urinating around the meat surely can't hurt and an electric fence is something i've been wanting to try. Good luck!
    Be sure not to pee on the electric fence though. At least not while it's on.

  18. #18
    Member Dusty's Avatar
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    Graybeard,
    Bears during the day I figure we can avoid .....or whatever. It would be super if the wolves would try to get the meat during the day because I am pretty sure there is a 10 wolves per day limit per hunter where I will be hunting. I guess we should definetly get some wolf tags.

    Thanks everybody for the great ideas. I'm sure that if I combine the electric fence, bleach and ammonia, bear bells, red pepper, cover it with a tarp, and pee all around it I should be in good shape.

    Thanks again for the ideas.
    [/SIGPIC]As free as ashes in the wind . . . .

  19. #19
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    I imagine that a bear fence would work, but at night I would also hang a lantern up high to illuminate the area around the meat. If it's moose season, the grizzly season is also open

  20. #20
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    Default Lantern

    Bears don't seem to like the "hissing" of a gas lantern

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