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Thread: Ruger Super Blackhawk

  1. #1

    Default Ruger Super Blackhawk

    I am thinking about getting a Ruger Super Blackhawk. I like it because it is a good strong, quality gun for a cheap price. I know it would be a good gun but what about that single action? You can proably shoot a single action just as fast as a double if you practice. Would this be fine to carry in bear country?

  2. #2

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    It's a good gun, but on the shooting single action as fast as double, I've tried it lots, and there's no way. Even fanning the hammer fake western style, you can't do it. And certainly not aimed shots.

    Much as I love the SBH, in my hands it's a hunting gun and not a protection gun. And it's a dandy hunting gun!!!! If you want a terrific hunting gun, get it.

    I'll take DA for protection, tho. If you're mind is running toward a protection arm buy the Redhawk, a reloading outfit, and about 5000 hard cast lead bullets. Shooting skill is going to be top of the list for protection, and there's no sense having a handgun if you can't shoot it well enough to do the job you intend it for. If protection is a REAL worry and you don't want to learn to shoot a handgun well enough to get good with it, buy a long gun.

    Sorry for the bit of a rant, but I'm still wound up from writing a response on another thread.

  3. #3

    Default Yes it's a fine gun I own several..I prefer the shorter

    barreled model for ease of carry and seems to be quicker on target for me...with lots of practice I think I can be as fast as double actions with heavy bear bullets...as a defense gun on the streets you would have to use reduced loads or 44 special rounds and then it would not be as fast as double action...for the street I prefer an auto..

  4. #4

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    I have 3 Ruger's in 44 mag, I had the SBH cut down to 4.75" the others are RedHawks. I load my SBH with 240 swc at -1000fps. Although I travel Alaska yearly,its difficult to arrive with a pistol. To answer your ? You can close down the trigger and work the hammer to fire the rounds on a SBH, it won't work on DA's. I believe it will be faster, and maybe more accurately.
    Jim

  5. #5

    Default Interesting how some many people see it so many ways.

    As a wilderness sidearm, the single action revolver is a fine gun to keep handy. Disclosure: I carry a 7.5" SBHH in .44 magnum on the trail. Proficiency with any handgun requires practice but the Ruger SBH gun points effortllessly and naturally. I prefer double action revolvers for PD and CCW but I have never found the same shootability and accuracy in any double action gun for the great outdoors. This is just my subjective and personal experience. Truly for hunting, the SBHH can't be beat IMHO. But here we're not talking about hunting but dangerous game defense.

    I would not recommend single action for carry as a general home defense or personal protection gun on the street. For these purposes, recoil is too great and reloads are too slow. You will want a smaller double action revolver for that. But in a bear defense situation, you probably won't have time to reload and you must make the first shot(s) count.

    About fanning the hammer on single actions. I wouldn't recommend that because you can easily damage the trigger system. Once the trigger breaks, your gun is a club. Besides, achieving accuracy in fan mode is the stuff of Hollywood - think "High Plains Drifter". No real life pistolero shoots this way. What you want is very fast and accurate shooting. With SA, your thumb is cocking the hammer under the recoil of the previous shot so no time is being wasted. By the time you're pulling the DA trigger on the next shot, you could also be pulling the SA trigger. I'm sure some will disagree with this but some will agree.

    Let's face it. Most people that I observe shooting .44 magnums usually start off in single action mode at least for the first shot when using a DA revolver. It's the natural thing to do so you can achieve the best accuracy on that first critical shot without a heavy trigger pull. Subsequent shots will be either DA or SA depending on the accuracy required and the time allowed for the shot. With lesser powered guns, DA mode is inherently faster but with .44 magnum and larger calibers the difference is not as great because you have to recover from the recoil either way. I'm at the point where the time difference between my SA and DA shooting with a .44 is very small and I dare say negligible so I'm going to use the more accurate gun. I think accuracy trumps speed. The more hits, the better and high speed misses only waste ammo.

    Of course, the goal is to achieve accuracy with speed. In truth, a well practiced SA pistolero can work a SBH so fast that the observer will be hard pressed to tell whether it is SA or DA. Shoot both DA and SA and choose the one that "feels" right to you. Go to the range with someone you know who has a SBH and knows how to use it and watch, listen and learn and ask questions. Do the same with the DA and make a decision.

  6. #6
    Member rlcofmn's Avatar
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    Default

    I agree with the single action. I have a 454 magnum resurch BFR and it comes up in my hand everyshot so it is natural to pull the hammer while i am bringing it back down. I have not shot the 44 enough to say for sure but with mine i dont think you could shoot a double any faster while keeping it in a bear sized target. Sure you may be able to get more rounds faster but they will be going everywhere but where you want them.

  7. #7
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    If you practice shooting double action with big bore revolvers, you just might find that it is more acccurate for off hand shooting. Yes, I know it is counter intuitive, but when you use the trigger to pull back to just short of the release point your hands are under tension which provides a more solid grip on the gun, and then you just squeeze of the shot as you would a single action.

    As I said, it takes practice, but you'll be amazed how will a DA can shoot when shot DA.

    As much as I like the blackhawk and super blackhawk, I shoot the super redhawk the most accurately.

  8. #8

    Default I myself have never shot a RH or a SRH..the

    way I understand it is that the RH has a trigger pull that isn't very good because the hammer and trigger use the same spring and the SRH uses 2 springs one for each and therefore can be slicked up better than the RH, but both of them can't be slicked up as well as the SBH or BH...whatdayathink

  9. #9

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    Slick all you want on the BH or SBH trigger and it will be about the same as a RH or SRH in single action. They're all good in single action. But slicking up a BH or SBH won't speed up your cycle time or aiming.

    And much as I prefer the Smith triggers to RH or SRH triggers, the Rugers have a more pronounced "stop" before the hammer drops. That can be an advantage for many folks learning how to shoot DA. I prefer the Smith without the stop because I started learning DA about 15 years before the Rugers came along. Come to think of it, they resemble Colt DAs in some ways, which I didn't like either.

    Paul pretty well summed up what's going on in DA shooting. Probably the best place to look for fast DA shooting and heavy loads is in the revolver bowling pin shoots. If there was any way to knock pins off the table faster in SA than DA those guys would be doing it. But there's not a single action in sight. Meanwhile DA times can rival semiauto times with a good hand on the revolver. The big difference in times comes from misses. You've got one spare bullet with a revolver and about as many as you can get your hand around with the semi. And that was the thinking behind the competition in the first place. I'm fast with a speedloader in a revolver, but it takes about three or four times as long to do it as changing mags in a semi.

    And don't forget, big as those bowling pins look, you have to hit them just right to clear them off the table with one shot. And just right translates into a "kill zone" about 1" x 2". Fan a SA all you want and pop caps till you're blue in the face, but you aren't going to be hitting that small a kill zone while you're doing it. Heck a bear brain is only about twice that size, but it's moving. And getting bigger by the nanosecond!

  10. #10
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    Default Ruger SBH in .44 Mag

    I didn't realize that they made it until I saw a RSH in the Blackhawk configeration with a fluted cylinder at the recent gun show. For some reason Ruger only makes the 5 1/2" barrel gun with the fluted cylinder, the other barrel lengths are unfluted - no idea why.

    The 5 1/2" is a good length for carrying and the fluted cylinder just looks better to me. As compared to a regular Blackhawk the SBH has a steel trigger guard and ejector rod assemblies.

    May not end up carrying it much but thought it was neat enough to buy. Should be a handfull with heavy loads.

  11. #11

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    I bet it's darned accurate, too. My only beef with the SBH over the RH is the long hammer fall. Just seems to have a slower "lock time" to me. Not an issue when you get used to it.

    I had a SBH clipped to 4 5/8" many years ago, and I can appreciate how you enjoy the 5 1/2" for carry. I might have gone longer but I was mating it with a family heirloom belt and holster.

    I usually pack mine with 44 specials at more or less standard velocities and HC 240 grain slugs, or use heavier charges of Unique when loading the same bullets in mag cases for about 1050 or 1100 fps chronographed to cut down on flash and blast with mags. Dandy deer swatter in either case. I loaded up some fairly fast 300 grainers in mag cases, and those sure set that little honey to rocking and rolling! I'd guess the same loads would be a lot more pleasant with your extra 7/8" of barrel.

  12. #12

    Default Interesting comments Brown Bear...I'm all about

    [quote=BrownBear;202504]Slick all you want on the BH or SBH trigger and it will be about the same as a RH or SRH in single action. They're all good in single action. But slicking up a BH or SBH won't speed up your cycle time or aiming.

    the first shot and thats all about a good trigger and sights...Good to know that the RH and SBH triggers in single action are about the same..makes me want to take another look at the RH in 4'' ....

  13. #13

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    You'll find the hammer fall on the SBH a lot longer and slower than on the RH, or at least that's apparent to me. Not a big dif when you're used to it, but every time I go from my RH's back to a SBH, it's range time for a while till I get used to the feel of it.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    ...For some reason Ruger only makes the 5 1/2" barrel gun with the fluted cylinder, the other barrel lengths are unfluted - no idea why.

    The 5 1/2" is a good length for carrying and the fluted cylinder just looks better to me. As compared to a regular Blackhawk the SBH has a steel trigger guard and ejector rod assemblies.

    May not end up carrying it much but thought it was neat enough to buy. Should be a handfull with heavy loads.
    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    ...My only beef with the SBH over the RH is the long hammer fall. Just seems to have a slower "lock time" to me. ...
    ....
    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    You'll find the hammer fall on the SBH a lot longer and slower than on the RH, or at least that's apparent to me. Not a big dif when you're used to it, but every time I go from my RH's back to a SBH, it's range time for a while till I get used to the feel of it.
    BrownBearI think you're right that the SBH hammer fall is longer. I'm not sure how much longer but it is noticeable to me although it has never bothered me a bit. Some folks say the longer hammer fall of the SBH has the advantage of preventing misfires since it strikes hard. There may be something to that.

    tvfinak, I like the Redhawk a lot. It seems to handle better than the Super Redhawk because the Redhawk has a full length steel grip while the SRH has the partial grip like the GP100 series. The partial grip makes the SRH seem top heavy and it makes my aiming take more effort. The Redhawk points more naturally to me. It was good that Ruger introduced the 4" Redhawk but I think the 5-1/2" version is a better all-around package and not really any more difficult to carry or conceal.

    I never figured out why some cylinders are fluted while others are unfluted. I guess it comes down to styling and I also like the looks of the fluted cylinder. S&W also makes some 629s with the unfluted cylinder. The only advantage I see is the thicker cylinder wall and the only disadvantage would be the slightly heavier weight of the unfluted cylinder. Other than that, I think it's just a styling issue. I would be interested to hear other inputs on the pros and cons of fluted/unfluted cylinders.

  15. #15

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    Fluted/unfluted never made a difference to me beyond looks, but then again I'm not one to push loads past SAAMI max. Judging by some of the loads I read about, I'd say unfluted would be a prime concern for safety and longevity of the gun.

  16. #16
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    Default Fluted vs unfluted cylinders

    The weak spot on any 6 shot cylinder is the cut for the locking bolt. The Ruger have it slightly offset from center a bit but its still the thinnest part of the cylinder by far. I don't think the fluting matters any when it comes to strength.

    Note that the S&W and other manufacturer's make 5 shot cylinders for their hottest calibers. S&W even made the littlle J frame 5 shot in .38 Spl and 6 shot in .38 S&W.

  17. #17
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    Default Super Red Hawks

    Although I've had a number of Blackhawks over the years in .357 to .45 LC I must admit I've never owned a SRH. While they are strong accurate pistols to me they just seem clunky and crude compared to the S&W pistols. I guess I just get carried away with the workmanship thing and the cast frames of the Rugers just don't compare to the forged machined frames of the S&W and Colt revolvers.

    The same thing goes for Ruger's auto pistols - they just don't feel or look right to me.

    Guess it is kind of a Ford vs. Chevy thing but I just can't warm up to Ruger DA revolvers or auto loaders. In fact I'd rather have a Colt SA but the dang things just cost too much.

    Ruger, like other manufactures have seen their workmanship decline quite a bit over time. My BH .44 made in 1956 is really a nicley made piece. Even the flagship Ruger No. 1 is not as nice as it was orginally.



    Quote Originally Posted by MrWoodsWalker View Post
    tvfinak, I like the Redhawk a lot. It seems to handle better than the Super Redhawk because the Redhawk has a full length steel grip while the SRH has the partial grip like the GP100 series. The partial grip makes the SRH seem top heavy and it makes my aiming take more effort. The Redhawk points more naturally to me. It was good that Ruger introduced the 4" Redhawk but I think the 5-1/2" version is a better all-around package and not really any more difficult to carry or conceal.

    .

  18. #18
    Member alaskamonte's Avatar
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    Default Brown Bear & Possible Nitpicking?

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I bet it's darned accurate, too. My only beef with the SBH over the RH is the long hammer fall. Just seems to have a slower "lock time" to me. Not an issue when you get used to it.

    I had a SBH clipped to 4 5/8" many years ago, and I can appreciate how you enjoy the 5 1/2" for carry. I might have gone longer but I was mating it with a family heirloom belt and holster.

    I usually pack mine with 44 specials at more or less standard velocities and HC 240 grain slugs, or use heavier charges of Unique when loading the same bullets in mag cases for about 1050 or 1100 fps chronographed to cut down on flash and blast with mags. Dandy deer swatter in either case. I loaded up some fairly fast 300 grainers in mag cases, and those sure set that little honey to rocking and rolling! I'd guess the same loads would be a lot more pleasant with your extra 7/8" of barrel.
    We likely have met, Los Anchorage is a tiny ole town and "gun culture" types tend to bump into each other, no?

    I believe on this thread the nitpicking about lock time never needed to be brought up, nobody here is setting up an single action for world silly-wet competition now are they?

    I assume ya knew Jack, the bow hunter that sold for Grace Distributors?

    He managed to make Alaska Bear Tales with his little single action Ruger and never mentioned any problems with lock time in private conversations.


    It's still an elite club Brown Bear, as Jack mentioned once, how many Alaskans have dumped a brownie with a pistol? (Worth a thread?)

    Time way well slow down in perception under stress but all I recall is thinking "When is the blank-blank trigger gonna break and focusing on that front sight"

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