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Thread: Porcupine hunting

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    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Default Porcupine hunting

    One winter my cousin and I were snowmachining up into the mountain to hunt for caribou, had all our camping gear and enough supplies and gas for a week. First day on the trail after reaching the mountains we spotted a porcupine, my cousin told me he hasn't eaten porcupine for a few years and when he saw it he really started craving for the meat. So he shot it with his 22 cal. I told him he would have to skin it and cook it for our evening meal, so after we set up our camp he started skinning it, he threw the hide beside a stand of willows near our camp. Freshly cooked porcupine is pretty good eating especially out in the mountains on a cold winter evening. We slept good that night, next morning we could hear something rustling around outside of our tent, my cousin looked out and there was a red fox and he was wearing the porcupine hide on his side. Guess the fox got trapped by the porcupine and had no way of getting loose. My cousin felt sorry for the fox so he shot it. Foxes are supposed to be pretty smart, well this fox got out smarted by a dead porcupine, must have been hungry or just too darn curious for his own good.
    Back to porcupine; my grandmother told me back in the old days hunters would not use guns or clubs to kill porcupine, they would just sharpen a good stiff stick and poke the porcupine in the eye pushing the stick all the way back into the brain.
    On another winter hunting trip a few years back two Elder hunters that we were hunting with decided that they wanted porcupine for dinner. So the first one they spotted they killed. Porcupine is very good eating when your out camping with a couple of Elders that are constantly telling hunting story after hunting story while your having dinner. There's more to a porcupine than just the meat.

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    man I love your stories, they are great!
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    I thought Alaskan Porcupines were protected and could only be killed in survival situations.............just curious.

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    No limit-No closed season

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    I ate one once years ago. It tasted OK but it was very fatty. I'll leave the quill pigs to someone who cares more for them than I do just not my cup of tea.

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    Member rlcofmn's Avatar
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    I have seen quite a few and was really temped to shot the first one I saw but didn't and later was told that people dont normally shoot them because they are one of few animals that you can kill with basically anything if you need something to eat in a survival situation. So that is my policy on shooting them now.

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    Member Valley Trash's Avatar
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    I heard they taste like chicken.

    Not nearly as good as a good ripe skunk though.

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    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Skunk pelt would probably make a nice fur hat. Bet nobody has ever spotted one up here in Alaska. What about a marmot? When I was herring fishing years ago I seen one @ Cape Newenham right on the beach amongst the boulders. My friend shot it, he said he was going use the fur for a a pair of mittens. I am sure he ate the meat too.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default The first time I caught one...

    ... I threw it on my snogo seat. Big mistake, but I was a greenhorn.

    Get one in the summer or fall (they taste better). Build a fire and roll them around before you gut them so you don't have to deal with the quills. Now they are easy to skin. Pot roast with onions and potatoes in a covered cooker such as you would use for turkey. Pretty good, but greasy and rich- kind of like beaver.

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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2PawsRiver View Post
    I thought Alaskan Porcupines were protected and could only be killed in survival situations.............just curious.

    We eat our state bird on a regular basis, one of my favorite meals. Bet you've never eaten a robin. Porkies and beaver are sometimes on the menu and hardly for survival food only. Ya might want too do a little digging and look up the "recipes for porkies" thread, Marcus posted a great general pasty recipe that works well with porkies. BTW never met a Michigander who didn't shoot the little beasts on sight weather they were headed for the pot or not.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick P View Post
    BTW never met a Michigander who didn't shoot the little beasts on sight weather they were headed for the pot or not.
    Same with Minnesotans. They get shot on sight unless I have the dogs with me. They tend to attempt to retrieve anything I shoot, and if it's wounded they LOVE to fight with anything in the raccoon size range. They have tangled with quill pigs a couple times each, and it's never pretty or fun.
    You know you aren't really having fun until you ask yourself -how much is this going to cost me?

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    Member RainGull's Avatar
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    Why shoot them on sight if not for the meat? Cool critters that eat bark, hard for me to understand. I guess if a guys got dogs and wants to smooth off all the rough edges for them?
    Science has a rich history of proving itself wrong.

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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Riangull
    I and almost everyone I grew up with has either spent hundreds on vet bills or had too put dogs down after encounters with a porkie. They kill tress on a regular basis. Everyone I know in Michigan who has a back country cabin spends several days each spring fixing porkie damage to there cabin.....the list goes on. Personally I do and always have eaten them (I don't shoot any critter I can't eat) and I on that point I agree with you, if ya shot it ya eat it.
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    porcupine are good eating! I generally use a club of sorts and save the bullets it is easier when you singe off the quills as the bloodshot is to a minimum. On the other hand if you use the quills for sewing as my wife does then hold off the singing and get what you need and a handfull or two is plenty-pun intended.

    When I trap I will now and again come across the tracks of a porcupine and will follow it until I catch up to it or it has gone to far. The meat if your not accustomed to it is rather rich and takes some use to getting at it. Like anything I suppose. I believe you have to teach yourself to eat what is walking so long it is eatable, ground squirrels, lynx, bear(s), beaver etc.....one day for those in the wild will need to harvest the like in order to get "substance" for dinner or....when the ever talked of hard times comes.

    This winter I have not came across one nor this past fall, so I envy Nukalp, it is a good meal and the elders do really enjoy a plate of porcupine. Thanks Nukalpiaq for bringing up a good thought.

    regards,

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    . BTW never met a Michigander who didn't shoot the little beasts on sight weather they were headed for the pot or not.
    Now you have to change that to, I've only met one

    To each their own, I've pretty much been a "if ones not planning on eating the other" live and let live.

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    Member MNViking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick P View Post
    BTW never met a Michigander who didn't shoot the little beasts on sight weather they were headed for the pot or not.
    Same in Wisconsin. They can do a remarkable amount of damage to your property and the forest.

    Who can name its natural predator???? I can.
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

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    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Timber wolves, wolverine, coyote, lynx, bobcat, mountain lion, great horned owl and the fisher are all natural predators of the porcupine.

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    Member MNViking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nukalpiaq View Post
    Timber wolves, wolverine, coyote, lynx, bobcat, mountain lion, great horned owl and the fisher are all natural predators of the porcupine.
    Fishers were what I was looking for. They are so fast that they can get underneath them and actually seek them out. At least thats what I learned in school. I don't doubt that the others do eat a few now and then.

    I wonder how an owl would do it.

    http://www.nhnature.org/Default.aspx?tabid=113
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

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    Quote Originally Posted by MNViking View Post

    Who can name its natural predator???? I can.

    Niinjii' the lynx-we all know that?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    man I love your stories, they are great!

    Hear Hear!! I love his stories too!



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