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Thread: Diseased game animals

  1. #1
    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Default Diseased game animals

    What should a hunter do and/or what does the regs allow if the game animal he harvests is diseased, and he doesn't find out until after the animal has been killed. What can a hunter do in this situation ?

  2. #2
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Call F&G

    I would call F&G and ask. Back in New York, if you took an animal, for instance that was gutshot by another hunter and the meat was bad, you could get another tag. The Game Warden would inspect the animal and if warrented, issued the new tag.

    It happens, can't always tell if an animal is sick at 300 yards.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  3. #3
    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Default

    Here is a weblink to the ADF&G Wildlife Disease & Parasites page:

    http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/index...g=disease.main

    When I was being taught how to hunt by my grandfather he would always carefully look over the animals that we harvested, including their organs. For some reason he would always inspect the liver very carefully, especially on the seals that we caught. I am guessing back in his youth a hunter could not afford to get sick from eating diseased animals. Medical help was not readily available back in those days, like it is now.
    Seen some USFWS/ADF&G reports a few years ago about caribou having hoofrot and more recently there are reports and notices going out into the general public about waterfowl and avain flu.
    Knew some teachers a few years ago that shot a caribou, this animal looked very unhealthy, I cautioned them about it and told them that if it was an animal that I shot I sure as heck would not bring it home to my family to eat. They proceeded to butcher it up and pack it away in their packs. The meat on this animal looked kinda slimey and when they opened up the abdomen it smelled terrible. Obvious indications that it was not healthy. I am guessing that they felt obligated to bring the meat home. My hunting partner and I thought it was an unwise decision on their part.
    Daveinthebush just wanted to add this caribou had previously been shot with a small caliber rifle (had old infected wounds on it side).

  4. #4
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default In the bush

    Better not to eat anything questionable in the bush. Toilet paper is sometimes hard to get.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  5. #5
    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Default

    Spoken like a true outdoorsman.

  6. #6
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default

    I have harvested a gutshot bou before and even though the wound was fresh the meat was not very good. I wish I could have given the meat to whomever gut shot it but we never found them. Felt good about putting it out of it's misery but was pretty much a waste of a tier II tag... Wish I would have tried to turn it over to ADF&G.

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