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Thread: New Reg Proposed Prohibit Use of Electric Reels for Halibut Sportfishing

  1. #1
    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Default New Reg Proposed Prohibit Use of Electric Reels for Halibut Sportfishing

    A freind just sent me this today. It was submitted to the International Pacific Halibut Commission by a commercial fisherman requesting that a regulation be put in place to prohibit the use of electric reels by sportfisherman.

    http://www.iphc.washington.edu/halco...nakreg2008.pdf

    Does anyone know how these things make it from requests to regulations? How do you lobby against something like this? I do know that there is strength in numbers, so anyone that would like to use electric reels in the future probabily should get vocal on this now!

    Jim

  2. #2

    Default No way

    That can't pass man. Too many people with bad backs, etc.
    I just bought two big ones with my dividend, so I hope not. I bought them for black cod but planned on them for halibut too.
    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

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    Member CanCanCase's Avatar
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    Default

    Don't say "that CAN'T pass".... if these things get up in front of the IPHC (once per year) and they decide there's some merit, all it will take is a lack of public comment for something like this too pass quickly.

    This particular proposal was considered at the IPHC annual meeting just this week. It didn't make it anywhere though. A number of charter operators expressed concern that they "deal with handicapped, elderly and youngsters, not to mention landlubbers who need a little help."

    I suspect we'll see a new version of the proposal in the future to try and prohibit the "jigging machines", but for all of us sport-sable-fishers, I think we're safe for now. At the very least, it will be until this time next year before the next annual meeting happens and another proposal can be considered.

    -Case
    M/V CanCan - 34' SeaWolf - Bandon, OR
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  4. #4

    Default I say make it a regulation

    I am all for it. I saw Larry Zconka use them on his North to Alaska show and was so disgusted that I almost stopped watching his shows. They are for lazy people and have no place in sportfishing. You can't call it fishing when the reel does all the work.

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    Member CanCanCase's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SalmonMan View Post
    I am all for it. I saw Larry Zconka use them on his North to Alaska show and was so disgusted that I almost stopped watching his shows. They are for lazy people and have no place in sportfishing. You can't call it fishing when the reel does all the work.
    So by extension, you don't use a downrigger to fish salmon, right?

    -Case
    M/V CanCan - 34' SeaWolf - Bandon, OR
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  6. #6
    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by SalmonMan View Post
    I am all for it. I saw Larry Zconka use them on his North to Alaska show and was so disgusted that I almost stopped watching his shows. They are for lazy people and have no place in sportfishing. You can't call it fishing when the reel does all the work.
    So why do we allow "lazy" commercial fishermen to use boats powered by internal combustion engines?

    The disciples of Christ used sails to commercially fish............

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SalmonMan View Post
    They are for lazy people and have no place in sportfishing. You can't call it fishing when the reel does all the work.
    Are you aware that most sablefish are found between 1,500-2,000 ft deep?

  8. #8

    Default How many turns

    Zikers!

    How many cranks to check the bait?

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    Member AKCAPT's Avatar
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    Default Deep Dropping

    There intent was most definitly to try to stop sport fishing for sablefish. Instead of going to the Board of Fisheries, the right way to address this concern, they went to IPHC and tried to link it to halibut; Which as can can said did not fly.

    Electric reels are used by people with and without disabilites all over the US to catch fish in deeper waters. It is very popular in Florida and elsewhere. They are catch big swordfish in the Gulf Stream in 1500 feet of water during the day using electric assist reels like the Daiwa Dendoh.

    You can crank them by hand or get a little 12 volt love on the way up if you get tired.

    Who cares what means a recreational fishermen uses to catch their limit of halibut. If you do like electric reels, simply don't use them.

    It is not like you are missing that much sport by not hand cranking your bait up 1200 feet to check it.

    I would suspect you see some kind of bag limit on sablefish in the next BOF cycle. In the mean time, catch as many as you want since there is no bag limit.

    Oh they make great halibut bait too.....Especially the small live ones....which is also currently legal.

    Sportfishing in SouthCentral is much better for them before the State water commercial opening in July

  10. #10

    Default

    Would a moderator please move this discussion to the Alaska Fishing Management subforum?

    Thx so much.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKCAPT View Post
    Sportfishing in SouthCentral is much better for them before the State water commercial opening in July
    The state commercial fishery (at least in PWS) is in May and again in August. There is no commercial sablefish fishery in July in state waters, though they have opened up the August fishery a few days early at least once.

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    Member AKCAPT's Avatar
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    Default Whattt?

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    The state commercial fishery (at least in PWS) is in May and again in August. There is no commercial sablefish fishery in July in state waters, though they have opened up the August fishery a few days early at least once.
    Mr. Moderator, I make my living as a fisherman and I am very careful to only talk about what I am sure about.....


    The 2007 Cook Inlet Area sablefish season opened at 12:00 noon July 15 with a 74,000 lb fishery guideline harvest level (GHL). The GHL was derived from historic harvest levels adjusted to reflect relative changes in the sablefish total allowable catch (TAC) in the federal Central Gulf of Alaska area. Regulations set a 48-hour, 3,000-pound trip limit, for the Cook Inlet sablefish fishery. Currently harvest in the fishery is approximately 62,000 pounds and four vessels are participating. Harvest projections indicate the GHL will be attained by 12:00 noon Wednesday, August 1. Therefore, to manage for the GHL, ensure adequate notice of the closure, and conserve the sablefish resource, the Cook Inlet sablefish fishery will close at 12:00 noon Wednesday, August 1, 2007.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKCAPT View Post
    Mr. Moderator, I make my living as a fisherman and I am very careful to only talk about what I am sure about.....
    I was speaking of the PWS state sablefish fishery. I mentioned that in the first sentence, but I guess I spoke too strongly in the second sentence. Quite frankly, I wasn't aware that there was a state fishery in Cook Inlet. Sorry for speaking too soon.

    I'm a permit holder in the PWS sablefish fishery, which opens on the dates that I mentioned earlier.

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    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Thumbs down If some on the IPHC

    have their way, the only Halibut anyone will be able to get will be from the deck of a commercial fishing boat.

    I have issues with those few commercial fisherman who have the narrow minded view that we should only by our fish from them and not be allowed to fish for it ourselves.

    The waste (by catch) the industry has far out weighs the amount of halibut the sport and guide (which BTW is still sport fishing) together. Solve that, then come to the sport fisherman to limit our take.

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
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    Default The real issue - finally

    After reading all the posts to the halibut, electric reel issues I was so pleased to see someone finally hit the issue that drives all these concerns, BYCATCH of Halibut by others fishing for species other than halibut. HOW can the federal government establish a limit for recreational (guided or not) that is less than 1/2 of what the commercial fishing industry wastes. This is caused by bottom draggers fishing for sole, haddock, and other shelf bottomfish that bring in halibut that is too small to process and damaged too far for recovery. These fish are thrown overboard, so there is no cost incurred by the perpetrators, so they have no incentive to reduce this waste. A single recreational angler can face financial penalties and even jail time for "Wanton Waste" of his fish if he was to catch, damage and release a single fish, but this corporate destruction continues with not only the blessing of the federal government, but BYCATCH is the ONLY FIXED allocation the IPHC endorses. When the total abundance of halibut goes down the bycatch does not change. This is (12 million pounds) and it is made up of animals that average 3 pounds, do the math, this is a lot of animals that if allowed to mature would double the amount available to all users. That is what needs to be addressed, the draggers have us fighting each other while they cruise to the bank. We are the fools for allowing this charterboat allocation to be forced on us. I have been fighting the issue since May 5th 1993 and even when we tried to integrate into the commercial "Gifted IFQ Position" we were delayed beyond acceptable limits by the National Marine Fisheries Service in Juneau. We will not see any management that will allow us to survive, much less thrive.
    CApt Bob of A-wardCharters.com

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    Default

    Capt, I think you are referring to one of my posts on the halibut thread.........and totally misrepresenting what I said.

    Most bycatch and that 12 million pounds you talk about is from the BERING SEA. The halibut issues and charter issues are NOT part of the bering sea at this time. It is a 2C issue. So please stop trying to compare the two as if it matters.

    There is NO trawling for groundfish in 2C it is prohibited. So no trawler bycatch happens anywhere south of PWS. So what does bycatch levels in the bering sea have to do with the discussion about 2C limits? NOTHING.

    Kodiak and the Northern GOA do have trawlers and bycatch but not in the amount of the bering. There currently is not a problem with halibut biomass or size in the Kodiak, sand point area that I know of? (anyone fish there that wants to chime in?)

    The Bering sea is a 2 BILLION doller fishery. The largest in the US and one of the largest in the world. It is fairly managed, and productive and substainable. In fact it is a model for the rest of the country and world.

    Halibut are a prohibited species for any vessel beyond sport or IFQ. The trawlers simply must return the halibut to the sea with a minimun of injury. Sometimes that means it's dead, sometimes it's not. While I am sure that the trawlers would love to sell it, or donate it that is not legal.

    12 million pounds may sound like a lot, and it is. But please try to remember that we take 2 MILLION metric tons or around 4 million straight tons out of the bering EVERY YEAR. So that should all stop because in Juneau and Sitka you have a halibut problem?? How selfish can you get?

    The only rational explanation that I can think if for the charter fleet down there to keep bringing it up is to take attention AWAY from the very real problems you have. From overstressed fish pops, to to many charter boats, to more and more cruise ships.

    I'd love to hear a rational explanation from you to prove me wrong. So far all I see is a willingness to throw other commercial fishermen under the bus. ( I say other b/c without a doubt in my mind you are a commercial fishermen). So please tell me and others what anthing going on in the bering has to do with Junea??? I can think of a couple that could be real, but would like you to point them out. Have a great day.

  17. #17
    Member CanCanCase's Avatar
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    Default

    Sorry to interject with my lack of mental skill, but I'm having trouble following this and the active halibut regs thread at the same time, since we're all really discussing the same issue in 2 threads...

    Would an admin mind merging these 2 threads?

    -Case
    M/V CanCan - 34' SeaWolf - Bandon, OR
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