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Thread: Remington model 720...

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    Default Remington model 720...

    Is anyone familiar with this rifle? If so we need to talk.

    I went in to a book store last week and was perusing through a book of stories and good pictures of the Vietnam war. In one of the pictures was an unidentified shooter (soldier, sailor, marine) with a Remington model 720. The rifle was not identified but I recognized the gun. I couldn't believe it. I studied it for a while to be sure and it was a 720. Has anyone ever used such a rifle in the military arena?
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    I ran into a sniper in a small village out side of Chu Lai who was using one. I don't remember all the circumstances except he loved his weapon.

    kingfisherktn

    Murph: I need to regroup it was a 721.
    Last edited by kingfisherktn; 01-15-2008 at 09:18. Reason: added info

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    Quote Originally Posted by kingfisherktn View Post
    I ran into a sniper in a small village out side of Chu Lai who was using one. I don't remember all the circumstances except he loved his weapon.

    kingfisherktn

    Murph: I need to regroup it was a 721.
    Yeah, I too have seen the 721 but my picture was of a 720.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Until recently, the Secy of the Navy gave Rem 720's out as Trophy rifles to Sailors and Marines. Most of the production was bought up in 1942 by the Navy. I think the last one was given out in 2000 or so to the High Navy rifle Shooter at Camp Perry. I have seen them and touched them, never used one. SON's continue to give out M1 Garands, some of which are M1 Mark II Rack Grade and Mark II Match Brade B's

    GNG had one in 257R in the early 80's, stock had been cut down, but the gun was in wonderful condition. I recall Remington only made about 400 of the 257 Roberts . Another one that got away; of course I was broke from buying too many other good deals.

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    Default Rem 720

    Murphy,

    I found this on Remington's site. Not much there, but is does indicate an item that wasn't destine for the civilian market.

    Shawn

    http://www.remington.com/library/his.../model_720.asp

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    Default Remington 720

    I have a Remington 720, and Im very familiar with the rifles. What can I do for you?

    LT

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    I've got one of the 720s also - it is what Remington should have done with the Mdl 30 when Winchester changed the Mdl 54 to the Mdl 70.

    Mine is a civilian one sold in the commercial market. I ran across it a gun show in Texas 10 - 15 years ago. If I recall it was around $700 or so.

    I don't care for the aluminum alloy trigger guard assembly but I guess that was big deal before WWII when evrything else was steel.

    I saw and bid on a bare 720 receiver on GunBroker a year of so ago - don't recall what it went for but I was too low.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
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    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    I've got one of the 720s also - it is what Remington should have done with the Mdl 30 when Winchester changed the Mdl 54 to the Mdl 70.

    Mine is a civilian one sold in the commercial market. I ran across it a gun show in Texas 10 - 15 years ago. If I recall it was around $700 or so.

    I don't care for the aluminum alloy trigger guard assembly but I guess that was big deal before WWII when evrything else was steel.

    I saw and bid on a bare 720 receiver on GunBroker a year of so ago - don't recall what it went for but I was too low.
    I'll give you $800 for it To think that Remington had that going for them and they ended up where they are with the 700 makes one wonder.

    Hers's a short but infromative conversation concerning the 720. http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/s...d.php?t=258720

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    Hey all of you that are or have wanted information on the Remington 720.
    1. Rare (yes)
    2. Available on open market (no)
    3. Book Value ($1400) +
    4. I sold one on gunbroker a few years ago. ($3100)
    *Gun in original box with all owners manuals and original leather sling all wrapped in the plastic wrap an cosmoline.
    *All military signing documents
    *The match bulletin showing who won the rifle
    *And USMC shooting team sweat shirt.

    I gave one to a special friend and am left with 4 others. Also I have an M-1 Garand engraved as a the others as a Secretary of the Navy Trophy rifle.

    Probably would sell the lot for nothing less than $15,000

    And yes they are in the original boxes. The Garand is not in a box.

    Here is a link that will tell you what you want to know about the 720.

    http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fi...l_720_1842.jpg

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    Neat stuff!!!! I've got a 721 in .30-06. I sure do like it when people come up with these topics.

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    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    Hers's a short but infromative conversation concerning the 720. http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/s...d.php?t=258720
    Mighty fine picture, EKC:

    I wooda thunk it war a Remington 725. How I usta long for one of those, but they apparently didn't make many.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    Mighty fine picture, EKC:

    I wooda thunk it war a Remington 725. How I usta long for one of those, but they apparently didn't make many.

    Smitty of the North
    At every gunshow I have been to, a guy has been lugging a 725 in a 06 around for about 425-450 I think. Stock is rough but can be refinished.
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    I lost this thread some time back...thanks for renewing it.

    The 720 Remington rifle is certainly not the 721....It is/was the final evolution of the Remington Model 30 Express rifle, which of course was originally the P-17 rifle of WW-I. Production started in October, 1941 at Serial number 40,044. The last known manufactured in 1946 for Griffen & Howe but routine production ended in 1944 at about S/N 42,500. They were made in 20" barreled carbines. Michigan State Police purchased a quantity of these. The U.S. Navy purchased a quantity of 22" barreled versions as well as some 24" "S" Special versions. Most were given away as award rifles for the Secretary of the Navy matches (All Navy & Marine Corp) and Secretary of Defense (Interservice) Match winners. Navy rifles are marked USN and FJA ordinance marks. I have a Navy Trophy Match rifle from the 1970's that has a nice walnut stock that was refinished and the FJA mark is gone. I won this rifle in the Navy match. I think the last one was given out in the 1990's, not sure when that ended, but I believe they are all gone now. I have heard of them being used in the Vietnam era by Navy and Marine Corp shooters as long range target interdiction tools.

    It is/was every bit the gun the Model 70 Winchester was, assembled by craftsmen gunsmiths. It was made in 30-06, 270 and 257 Roberts. The Navy guns were all 30-06 as far as I know. I have seen the rifle in only it's sporter configuration with 22 inch barrel and a few with the 24". I've seen them fitted with match sights on the receiver, both Redfield and Lyman and no barrel mounted rear. I think such this configuration was factory. I do know of a couple Navy guys who shot matches with them back in the '70's.

    This was a fine rifle and a very rare, obscure rifle. Its too bad the economy and the war ended production of such a good rifle.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    I lost this thread some time back...thanks for renewing it.

    The 720 Remington rifle is certainly not the 721....It is/was the final evolution of the Remington Model 30 Express rifle, which of course was originally the P-17 rifle of WW-I. Production started in October, 1941 at Serial number 40,044. The last known manufactured in 1946 for Griffen & Howe but routine production ended in 1944 at about S/N 42,500. They were made in 20" barreled carbines. Michigan State Police purchased a quantity of these. The U.S. Navy purchased a quantity of 22" barreled versions as well as some 24" "S" Special versions. Most were given away as award rifles for the Secretary of the Navy matches (All Navy & Marine Corp) and Secretary of Defense (Interservice) Match winners. Navy rifles are marked USN and FJA ordinance marks. I have a Navy Trophy Match rifle from the 1970's that has a nice walnut stock that was refinished and the FJA mark is gone. I won this rifle in the Navy match. I think the last one was given out in the 1990's, not sure when that ended, but I believe they are all gone now. I have heard of them being used in the Vietnam era by Navy and Marine Corp shooters as long range target interdiction tools.

    It is/was every bit the gun the Model 70 Winchester was, assembled by craftsmen gunsmiths. It was made in 30-06, 270 and 257 Roberts. The Navy guns were all 30-06 as far as I know. I have seen the rifle in only it's sporter configuration with 22 inch barrel and a few with the 24". I've seen them fitted with match sights on the receiver, both Redfield and Lyman and no barrel mounted rear. I think such this configuration was factory. I do know of a couple Navy guys who shot matches with them back in the '70's.

    This was a fine rifle and a very rare, obscure rifle. Its too bad the economy and the war ended production of such a good rifle.
    An interesting story on the model 720 Remington.In the Autumn of 1941 just before Pearl Harbor my Father as a very young man purchased a Model 720 Remington in 30-06 in SE Alaska along with a thousand rounds of ammo.He soon got a job hunting for a logging camp and shot many Sitka Blacktail deer with the rifle along with a marauding Brown bear who tore a loggers scalp half off (the man lived) .After WW2 broke out my Dad left Alaska to join the US Marines with great difficulty taking the rifle with him on the Canadian Railway Steamship to Vancouver and then to the USA.My Dad survived Tarawa and Iwo Jima.After the war the Remington 720 accounted for many pieces of game in Montana and Pennsylvania.My Dad passed a few years ago and but the Remington is still in service.While I was in the Marines in the 80's I had an Armorer bed the rifle and put a 4x Kollmorgen scope on it that I had purchased as new.The Remington is now better than ever despite years of service between 2 Marines. What makes the Remington 720 I believe even better than the pre 64 Winchester (I own both) is Mauser controlled feed (like the M70),Mauser breaching much stronger and safer than the M70 ,Speed and ease of working the bolt (the fastest I have ever used) Great trigger and possibly the best rotary safety ever made on a hunting rifle;silent and fast.The 720 also stays zeroed much better than the old Pre 64 which had 4 bottom screws and could be a nightmare at times to keep zeroed.If anyone needs more info (or pictures)on this rifle I would be glad to supply it (Remington only made 2,400 or so ) I have used the rifle extensively for years.

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