Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: Cold weather tip.

  1. #1

    Default Cold weather tip.

    Here is a little tip for those that do not know and live in the cold.....

    When you shut your machine down for the night or an extended period do it with the choke. So instead of turning it off with a key or kill switch choke it! The next time you go to start it it will pull over a lot easier and start quicker.

    Just sharing some info.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Gakona Ak
    Posts
    1,493

    Default Why?

    Ok tell me why that helps. I live where it is very cold, currently it is Ė57 f and if it helps I will try it, but tell me why it helps?

    Walt
    Northwest Alaska Backcountry Rentals
    Your best bet in Rafts and camp rentals
    www.northwestalaska.com
    Kotzebue, Alaska
    33 miles north of the Arctic Circle

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    If you work your choke lever a couple of times at shut-down your choke won't freeze the next time you start it. It's most important if you've been sucking snow into your airbox filters. I've done it since I froze a choke on a '91 Indy 500. If your choke freezes you can get a few miles away from the truck before the motor quits. For those who remember the hills within the first few miles of the old Church Road trail into the mountains, imagine dragging an Indy 500 up those hills with only two guys and one running short track. That was a miserable day.

  4. #4
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Squarebanks
    Posts
    661

    Default Tundra

    Do the new tundras have chokes? I have a tundra R and it has a fuel primer pump so no choke to mess with. Just curious. -44 F at my house this morning the the old tundra started on the 3rd pull.

  5. #5
    Member aufevermike's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    159

    Default

    The whole theory behing using the choke is that it draws in extra oil. So I have heard. Therefore, lubricating the cylinders an extra bit.

  6. #6

    Default hope this helps

    has anyone poured out 2 cycle oil at -30? oil is really thick when it's cold, when you put on the choke, you are dumping raw gas into the cylinder, thereby washing the oil film off the piston skirt and cylinder, wahla an easier turning over engine! you can also pull the plugs out, and with the kill switch OFF, turn the engine over a few rev's to loosen things up, then put the plugs back in and start. hope this helps

  7. #7
    Member SusitnaAk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    ANCHORAGE
    Posts
    774

    Default Cold

    What ltsryd said , Been known to heat plugs up with propane torch While have them out, then stick them in, Every little trick in the book helps at that cold...Than when she fires up, have somebody hold up or tilt to the side get that track to spin, feather the gas so dosn,t eat the belt.

  8. #8
    Member polarisblake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Wa-stupid
    Posts
    108

    Default pulling belt

    All of these tricks work better than not doing it at all so good advice. One thing I do is if I know its going to be cold (-25) I will pull the belt and bring it in with me. This doesn't really add to the ease of starting but it will save you from smoking a belt or dirtying your clutches up and at near $60 per belt it saves you money!!!

  9. #9

    Default Why does it work???

    I do not know the ins and outs of it. I had read it in SnowTech a couple years ago and tried it. It worked! I shared it with some buddies to see what they thought and it is now a standard method of shutting down our machines for the night. The coldest I have tried it has been -38F and it worked great compared to my buddy who had forgotten to do it.

    Do not get me wrong, it will not start your machine the first pull. It makes pulling it over easier. This may be why it makes it start easier.?

    Give it a try, it doesn't cost anything.

  10. #10

    Default

    I'm new to all of this. Question, any advise on cold starting 4 strokes?

    Thanks...

  11. #11
    Member Adventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Waterboro, Maine
    Posts
    104

    Default

    I've only had a hard start once on 4 strokes. We started both sleds cold at -35 and moved them 100 feet to do some work on them, then moved them back 100 feet. The next morning -35 again, they wouldn't fire. Our mistake was not letting them warm up and should hold true for any motor. Repeated cold starts with out running it a while will foul out the plugs. I kicked myself for doing such a stupid thing.

    The only tip I can offer is for the Yamahas with the thumb choke. Start cranking first and then roll the choke on gradually while cranking untill it gets to the sweet spot for the particular temp you're in. This helps to keep from flooding in real cold weather because it's actually an enrichment valve rather than a choke.

    Because of this enrichment set up not actually having a butterfly plate like a normal choke, if you like to smoke it down the lake at wide WOT, you can crack this choke and get an extra 5 mph by dumping more fuel in.

  12. #12
    Member MARV1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Kotlik
    Posts
    640

    Default

    I've been doing this for 10 years now since I bought my first bigblock, '98 700xcsp.
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

  13. #13
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    Any machine that has Mikuni carbs does not have a choke. The "choke" lever you pull actually opens a circuit in the carb that dumps raw fuel into the carb venturi and is drawn into the cylinder. By shutting off with the "choke" lever you are flooding the engine and probably wiping off some of the excess oil in the cylinders.

    Some machines that use Mikunis just use a primer like many of the SkiDoos. I happen to think primers are superior to the enrichment circuit used on other Mikuni carbs.

    The Keihin and Mikuni flatslide carbs..I have no idea.

  14. #14
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1

    Default Summit 500 wont start when hot!

    Hi and thanks in advance for any possible advice/help.

    I have a 96' summit 500 that runs great and starts easy when cold or the 1st start of the day. If I shut it down after riding and attempt a restart it will NOT START!!! I've pulled my arm off and developed a very strong right shoulder but my Ski-doo refuses to re-start. It has the primer system (no choke)
    Please help!!

    Dan

  15. #15

    Default

    I have the same sled..when starting hot hold throttle wide open. Don't use the primer when hot it will just flood it.

  16. #16
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    Use your left arm.

    Seriously... use your left arm to pull and use your right hand to hold the throttle wide open. If that doesn't work, check your mixture as it sounds like it's too rich.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  17. #17
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    On that Summit. Check your compression. A sled with low compression will often be hard to start, especially when warm. On a '96 it may be time for new rings..or even pistons. Do NOT use the primer or the "choke" when a sled is warm.

  18. #18

    Default

    My 30+ yrs of exp say that killing a two-stroke with the choke tends to lend itself to fouled plugs...just try a sub-zero start with pre-fouled plugs...let me know how long you last

  19. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bethell View Post
    My 30+ yrs of exp say that killing a two-stroke with the choke tends to lend itself to fouled plugs...just try a sub-zero start with pre-fouled plugs...let me know how long you last
    I'm with you on this notion. Better off to keep the plugs clean and sparking. Pull the plugs when it is cold and pull the engine thru a few times. Works on aircraft equally as well.

  20. #20

    Default

    I broke trail for the Yukon Quest this year. It was -55 f for the first two days. I tried the choke theory and it didnít work. It takes 10 minutes with both hands rocking on the seat to get the cylinders to move fast enough for it to fire. I rode a 700cc Yamaha Viper.
    The trail boss rode a Cat 4 stroke with command start. In his sleeping bag he would roll over to the window and hit the starter on his key fob. He started it every 3-4 hours and had no problems. The auto start function stopped working while trailering the machines to Eagle Summit from Fairbanks. It was -46 when we left town. The auto start function worked twice then never again. Cat has some more work to do on that.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •