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Thread: Angle Compensating Rangefinders

  1. #1
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    Default Angle Compensating Rangefinders

    What do you guys know about the new, or newer rangefinders that include angle compensating? Looks like there are a couple of manufacturers, Nikon, Bushnell, Pentax (?), and Opti-Logic.
    I would use it way more often for bowhunting than rifle hunting. Pros and Cons? Good and bad? I did read some reviews but thought I would ask all you guys.

  2. #2
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    Default Old post from my trip with a Leupold RX II

    Ak River Rat,

    Below, is an old post I wrote about a Leupold RXII. I will never buy another Leupold Range Finder. The angle comp did work at a bear stand where I ranged a 55 gallon barrel at 20 to 30 yards, but that's a highly refective object. Looking back, I think Leupolds have a hard time with non-reflective objects and shaky hands.

    Recently, Santa Clause replaced my RX II with a Nikon 600. I already have a moose in the feezer, so the only thing I have ranged with the Nikon is my neighbor's dog. I think that's close enough to the real thing... small, hairy, moving a lot. So far, the Nikon has given me accurate and quick readings on the dog.



    "I just came back from hunting caribou on the Haul Road. The most UNRELIABLE piece of equipment was no doubt my Leupold RX II range finder. Held absolutely still, I could usually range big rocks, trucks, and stop signs at close distances.

    Along the way back from a super long and unsuccessful stalk on a caribou, I tried ranging my full size, 4 door, long bed truck with topper. I started at about the 800-1000 yard point, but who knows I was using an RX II. Finally at 286 yards I got a reading from the range finder.

    I did range a few caribou, but never any closer than 120 yards and never without using both hands as a steady hold. I was really expecting to reach into my pocket (one handed) click on the bou and get feedback as they would close the distance. That's what I did last year with a borrowed Nikon 440. Anyone here with similar results with Leupold?"

  3. #3
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    Default Nikon 440

    I have the NIKON Prostaff 440 laser rangefinder and really like it. I rarely fail to get a reading, unless I have messed up and am trying to range a moose at 600+ yards with it and it won't work.
    But the new Angle Compenating units look interesting, especially when looking at archery goat, sheep, elk, hunts in the mountains where steep longer yardage shots may be common.
    I watched a clip on YouTube where a guy shot almost vertically, or so it seemed. I wonder if that would have been a good place for an Angle Compensating Rangefinder?
    Was the RXII angle compensating?

  4. #4
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    Default

    Angle compensating? Yes

    Accurate? Yes (when it gave a reading)

    Reliable? NO!

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    Default programming?

    KWP, did you have to program ballistics into it?

  6. #6
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    Default

    No, it had 3 or 4 pre-set ballistic compensation modes. All you had to do was select which mode. One was "bow" mode, 10 to 50 or 60 yards. Then it had A, B, and C mode. Each different mode was for various rifle/cartridge types. The quick reference "cheat" card stayed in the carrying case and it listed the different meanings for A, B, or C. A = 223 thru 260, B = 270 thru 30-06, C = 270 WSM thru 300 WM, etc ... Then there were combinations of letters for a whole range of calibers and ballistic groups. Once it was set for the rifle you were carrying, it stayed in that mode. No need to reselect the mode each time you ranged a target.

    I'm not sure of the examples I gave you, but you can kinda get the point. I'm mostly a bow hunter, so I wasn't too familiar with it's ballistic compensation features. I really wanted it for treestand hunting, but lost all confidence in the thing after my first bow hunt with it.

  7. #7
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    Default

    I love my RXII, the only time I had an issue with it not ranging was when the battery was getting low, the battery level showed it was about half and I put in a new one and it worked just fine.

  8. #8

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    Is the ARC worth considering for Mountain hunts? If so, which one is the one to get? I think for the mixture of us out here we should look at these in rages from $200-$300, $300-$400, $500+. Pretty new to the whole range finder thing, but very intrigued.
    Last edited by 1911-MW; 02-21-2008 at 08:42. Reason: typo

  9. #9

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    Just hoping to bump this back to the top.. Tried finding some threads on range finders.. Any good advice for someone who had never used one before? What brands / Models should I check out? Any info would be appreciated....

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