Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: lights for night travel

  1. #1
    Member nahmint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Powell River, BC
    Posts
    34

    Smile lights for night travel

    I'm trying to figure out the best location on the boat to place lights suitable for travelling at night... (also suitable brands). Our boat is presently being built... Hewescraft Searunner 220 ET/HT. I'm hearing about problems with glare from lights mounted on the hardtop... also have experienced that problem with the new style halogen lights on my old boat. Any advice out there is greatly appreciated. I don't plan on travelling at night but you all know it just happens... Thks.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    Wooldridge mounts halogen lights in the bow. If you mount them to high the glare will kill your eyes.
    But since you don't plan on needing the lights why not just carry a couple of 12 volt spot lights?
    Tennessee

  3. #3
    Member nahmint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Powell River, BC
    Posts
    34

    Default lights for night travel...

    thanks, Randy. I will pack hand held lights too, as I do in my present boat, but was hoping to rig this boat with some remote lights that would do the job a little easier. Based on your suggestion, though, I've contacted Hewescraft to see if they have recommendations. I'll post their response...

  4. #4
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,291

    Default In the bow or on the bow rails way up front

    Glare will kill your eyes and the light will reflect of of bow rails, even if painted. Pretty much anything in front of the lights will reflect. Only way that makes sense is in the bow. I have seen them like this. Just not sure how they hold up. Busting seas and such. If a way to run wires through bow rails or inside anchor hold then up the side of the rail. I have been thinking about this for my boat. Only problem would be if they are in the way. Up front is where we pull anchor, and climb on and off the boat when beaching or dropping people off. Even if on one or two rail uprights back would be good. Just so nothing is in front of the beam.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    You are more than welcome to stop by my house and look at my Wooldridge Alaskan. It has two "head lights" mounted in the bow. They are protected by a glass lens just like a automobile headlight. The installation is very well designed and they are out of the way yet easily reached if repairs are ever needed.
    Tennessee

  6. #6
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    You said the boat is currently being built, so have them put recessed light mounts in the bow. You can get purpose-built marine grade lights to put in there (hint- buy lights first, then have builder install them). Do not even consider anything in the automotive grades. I've seen surface and recess mount flood lights in the marine supply catalogs and I've seen them on a few commercial fishing boats and salt-water guide skiffs. They hold up just as well as the recessed navigation light units.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  7. #7

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by nahmint View Post
    I'm trying to figure out the best location on the boat to place lights suitable for travelling at night... (also suitable brands). Our boat is presently being built... Hewescraft Searunner 220 ET/HT. I'm hearing about problems with glare from lights mounted on the hardtop... also have experienced that problem with the new style halogen lights on my old boat. Any advice out there is greatly appreciated. I don't plan on travelling at night but you all know it just happens... Thks.
    Whenever I have a question of "best practice" for something on my boat, I tend to look to the commercial boats; see how they handle the same issue.

    While HPS crab lights are a little ridiculous for a 22 footer, you can never have enough light when it's dark and foggy, both for visibility to drive and for the safety of being seen by others.

    I would strongly encourage you to build in the safety of some very strong fixed lights that illuminate the water ahead (and hopefully behind) of you, combined with a swivel beam that you can use to anchor, search, and other tasks. You may want to be able to swivel around and light up something behind you as well.
    Probably the best way to do this is with some type of radar arch/tower or roof rack.

    http://www.magnalight.com/pc-372-65-...of-handle.aspx


    http://strobesusa.com/cart/index.php...index&cPath=12

    http://www.pickupspecialties.com/GoL...spotlights.htm

    http://www.nauticalcreations.com/Universalarches.htm



    But it should go without saying that you'll feel a lot more comfortable at night and/or fog with a radar.
    Combined with your lights, compass, and GPS, radar is the best light you can ever use. You can also interface it with a chartplotter and depth sounder to get an all weather information system.
    With a small radar you can dead reckon, avoid collisions with fixed and floating things, even determine sea state ahead of you or look for birds (that feed on fish). You can use your radar and radio to direct unequipped boats out of the fog when they otherwise couldn't move or dead reckon confidently. ("I see you need to move more west to see my lights and follow me back to the harbor"...)

    Radar also indicates your position and bearing to other vessels very precisely when it's on, and can be used to indicate your intent from miles away without you saying a word.

    Good insurance!


    http://anglerslounge.com/proshop/fur...dar-p-178.html

    Good luck and have a ball outfitting your new boat!

    Ish

  8. #8
    Member nahmint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Powell River, BC
    Posts
    34

    Default search lights....

    Thks Ish... the stuff on the furuno radar is useful too...

    Another suggestion I've received is to install the light(s) on the bow rail, and to keep them covered during the day...

  9. #9
    Member nahmint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Powell River, BC
    Posts
    34

    Default

    Joat & Randy.... thks... I've got an e-mail off to Hewescraft to see what options they have in the factory....

  10. #10

    Default Light installation.

    Some food for thought....

    I mount night lights on top of the cabin. It takes a little work figuring the best location but they are out of the way and protected from big waves.

    To keep from having glare on rails you move the lights back just far enough for some of your cabin to work as a shield. If you are getting to much glare move them back a little further and try again. Repeat this process until the lights shine just over your rails with very little glare.

    Mount the lights to a 2x4 and clamp to top of cabin. Take it out for a spin. Move 2x4 forward or aft until correct position. Once correct position is found install a UHMW block permanently and then mount lights to block.

    A handheld or hard mounted spotlight compliments these greatly.

  11. #11

    Default

    On my old Hewes river runner I used 2 foglights on the bow, I used foglights because they greatly reduce glare. I mounted each one on a fish-on rod holder and used a flush mount base, that way when I did not need them I could stow them away.

  12. #12
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    This is what I am doing on the new boat. We will see how they hold up in the marine environment. I know of two other boats that have been using them for the past couple of seasons with good results. We will see. If they don't work, at least they look cool!

    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  13. #13
    Member nahmint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Powell River, BC
    Posts
    34

    Thumbs up lights for night travel...

    Itsryd: great suggestion... makes alot of sense to me. I'll definitely test it out when the boat arrives. THKS.

  14. #14
    Member nahmint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Powell River, BC
    Posts
    34

    Default lights for night travel...

    Spoiled one: those do look great! What's your new boat and when do you get it???

  15. #15

    Default

    Anyone actually use there lights to get around in pitch black darkness? I would like to know what there experience was and how well they could see. The reason I ask is I have two lights mounted on my radar mast up on the roof, on land they shine like lasers as far as you can see. Compared to car headlights, they are almost stronger and go farther, but at sea it seems very different. I know there is a depth perception issue being on the water and looking toward land that can have an effect. I don't count on them like I wanted to when I was installing them, I thought I could drive around in the dark like driving a car at night. There must be something to those giant lights on the crab boats. I also have a three foot anchor pulpit with railing around it that does get lots of glare, you have to look right through it when you drive regardless. I'm interested to hear others experiences with night driving. -Thanks

  16. #16
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nahmint View Post
    Spoiled one: those do look great! What's your new boat and when do you get it???
    It is a 29 foot glaciercraft. It is basically done. I am just waiting for windows and power. The lights probably will be more for other boats to see me, I will rely more on the radar if I run in the dark. Maybe I will be surprised, though.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  17. #17
    Member nahmint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Powell River, BC
    Posts
    34

    Default night lights for travel....

    Meyers... on my old boat i had a mechanically controlled spot light mounted above and to the starboard side of my wheel and controls... much like those mounted on some of the "old" 50' and 60's vehicles.. remember???... it was a marine surplus unit, sealed beam, and worked very well whenever I got caught out at night.... also travelled considerable distances at night with it... it really highlighted any drift on the water, so I felt quite safe. But, on the same boat I experienced major glare with the newer high candle power hand helds.... maybe its a beam size/halogen/intensity issue??? That's why I'm being so cautious with lights on the new boat. And, I like the idea of mounting it (them) on a 2x4 and testing various locations on the hardtop before drilling any holes...

  18. #18

    Default 100's of hours driving at night.

    Anyone actually use there lights to get around in pitch black darkness? I would like to know what there experience was and how well they could see.
    Myers,

    I have driven 100's of hours at night. Mostly on larger vessels, tug boats, landing crafts, and large charter vessels.

    The lighting on water is much different than a road. An example would be the difference of driving at night with moose lights when there is snow and when there is not. The water seems to absorb the lights unless there is chop or debris. The white chop from the seas reflects the light as does logs and such. So if all you see is a vast darkness then there is little chance of a log in front of you and the seas are calm. When something catches your eye because the light reflected off of it then you have an obstacle.

    When you enter a bay the lights are priceless as they help to get you oriented to your whereabouts. Lights, radar, depth sounder, and a GPS plotter are all tools to be used if you plan to do much operating at night. If it is snowing hard or foggy you get a horrible glare and question the use of lights at that time.

    Just a reminder to those that use the "big" lights to be seen by other boats... The lights help you to be seen but please be cautious that you are not blinding the other vessel. Also, make radio contact with the other vessel so a plan to pass can be made. When you have lights on, the other vessels can not see your running lights and are unable to tell the direction you are headed.

    Happy boating!

  19. #19

    Smile

    Hey thanks, thats good stuff and makes sense.

    Happy boating to you as well.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •