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Thread: 375 H&h Ammo

  1. #1
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default 375 H&h Ammo

    My wife just got me a new Remington 375 H&H as an anniversery present for my bear hunt this fall. Just wondering about some ammo recommendations for the gun and the bear

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    Congratulations sir...it's a fine caliber and perfect for the task you have in mind.

    I'm assuming you are after brown bear? If so, I'd recommend premium bullets in the 300 grn range, e.g., Barnes TSX, Swift A-Frame, Nosler Partition, Trophy Bonded Bear Claw, etc. You could go down to 270 grn bullets with the TSX's if you want...they'll still do the job.

    Good luck to you this fall. There's nothing like bear hunting. It's my favorite.

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    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    If your going to reload there are quite a few great bullets to choose from in several different weights, but if you are buying factory ammo, there doesnt seem to much out there at most stores in the lower 48, and I have seen prices from high to insane! for best punch for the money I would stick with Federal, Hornady or Remington brand loaded ammo with a 270 or 300 gr bullet for bears.
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

  4. #4

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    Getting in enough practice with this caliber is not going to be cheap. You didn't mention handloading your ammunition, so I am assuming you are buying it. But at least 4 or 5 boxes of the cheapest ammo you can find. Shoot a lot. Shoot it all up. Then either buy some premium ammo for the .375 from Federal or Remington in the aforementioned 270 or 300 grains or have a competent buddy load some good ammo for you. Practice with that ammo at various long and short ranges (20 yd. to 200 yd.). Please, don't even think of shooting at a brown bear beyond 200 yds. It would be best to keep your shots within 100 yds. You have the right rifle and caliber. Get the right ammo for big, tough animals, and practice, practice, practice! Shoot from practical field positions once your rifle is sighted in. Don't do all your shooting from a bench. Good luck.
    Jack.

  5. #5

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    I'd sure talk it over with your guide. They've seen more bear shot and shot more themselves than anyone else around here. And along the way they have formed their preferences. Most I know shoot one variety in particular, but I'll let your guide speak for himself on that.

    And however you can manage it, do follow the advice for doing lots of shooting between now and then. Your guide is going to put you through a sight-in session before taking you out into the field "to make sure the gun is still sighted in after riding on airplanes." While that is certainly one of the benefits of the session, what he's really doing is seeing how well you can shoot and planning the hunt accordingly. If you can't keep your shots on the paper, plan on hunting a whole lot harder just to get close enough to the bear that the guide has some hope you'll actually hit it in the vitals rather than starting a long saga with a wounded bear.

  6. #6

    Default Practice

    Once you have your rifle sighted in, at the bench. Just pretend you are still in in corp. and shoot from different positions and shoot often. Your guide won't carry a bench for you to shoot off of. Practice shooting in inclimate weather also, windy conditions, drizzly rain will be common on bear hunts. Make sure you can shoulder your new rifle with your coat and rain gear on (it will change your length of pull). Start a walking and excercise program (if you haven't already, it will pay off). All this said practice, practice, practice and have a great hunt.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

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  7. #7

    Thumbs up Great choice in .375

    The .375 H&H is all the gun you will ever need for bear. It is truly amazing.
    Whatever you do, use GOOD bullets!!!! I am a firm belieer in Nosler Partitions. There are some other excellent top of the line ones out there, too.

    NEVER just go but cheap stuff and think it will deliver the same results as the premium. I will never shoot another animal with Hornady's. I had one explode right under the hide on a bear, and it isn't the most pleasant thing to have to face an angry charging wounded bear.

    I use 300 grain Nosler Partitions in handloads and nothing else. They just work to perfection.

    I buy cheap as I can to practice with, and shoot a couple of the Noslers just to make sure they hit in the same area. You need to shoot and shoot until the gun and it's function is second nature to you. Your life or someone elses may just depend on it. Remember, these bears have the ability to "shoot back", and you may have to function and fire that gun without having time to think about it.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

  8. #8

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    I'll sign back on to help emphasize the practice part of owning a 375. It's going to be kind of a religious experience first time you touch one off at the bench. Don't lean down low to shoot! Raise the gun rest high enough that you are sitting fully upright when you shoot so your waist can flex and help absorbe the recoil. If it feels too much, shove a 25 pound bag of shot between you and the gun till you get it sighted in. You don't want to get bit and let the thing scare you.

    Once it's sighted in, get away from the bench and never go back. The gun isn't going to bite nearly so bad when you get away from the bench, and it actually starts to be fun.

    Shoot mostly offhand, kneeling and sitting. I'd put a minimum of ten rounds through it in each position every time you shoot. I shoot a minimum of 200 rounds each spring before I start carrying the gun again, and before a hunt, I do enough range sessions to get in 400 rounds. Yeah, reloading and cheap bullets for practice are VERY GOOD ideas. There's simply no substitute for shooting and lots of it to make friends with a 375 and learn that it isn't nearly as tough to shoot as many think.

  9. #9
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default thanks

    I appreciate all of the input and advice. I plan to do the things mentioned for sure!! I have always wanted one and can't wait to pull the trigger. As a Marine who takes shooting very seriously, you can be sure that I will be ready. I haven't reloaded in alot of years due to the fact that I had lost everything in a fire. It may be time to get back started. I just called the gun shop and told him to see what he could find at the cheap end to start thing and to get some brass. I'm headed goose and duck hunting for a week and he should have some by the time I get back so I can play with my new toy. I do know a couple or professional reloaders so I'll just play that part by ear. Thanks again for all of the help. When the family gets moved there I'm buying all of the beer for those who can make it!!!

  10. #10
    Member alaska bush man's Avatar
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    Thumbs up 375 Hh

    If your talking about big costal Brown bear the 300 gr Nosler Part or the new 300 gr Nosler Accubond and 270 Barnes TSX The 300gr AB will be out later in 2008.

    For everthing else here in Alaska the 260 Accubond and 270gr TSX.

    the 270gr TSX would be the all around load for Alaska with Reloader 15 powder.

    My hometown for 26 yrs in Lenoir NC!

  11. #11

    Default Col M

    Bought my CZ 375 H&H two years ago and to date have fired over 2000 rounds thru it, all reloads,75% off a bench. I mainly hunt pigs and to date all were one shot kills,good medicine ! 300 gn hornady between the eyes of a water buffalo and its dead before it hits the ground. I love it.And of course it recoils,be a big boy and let it thump you,it doesn't hurt. My latest rifle on order is a Rem 700 in 300 RUM.I hope it kicks too,lets me know i'm having fun.

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    IF you were willing to spend this much on loaded ammo, I'd think this would be about the ultimate choice for dangerous game;

    http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...630&t=11082005

    I've heard a lot of good things about the 350gr. Weldcores, plus, as a bonus, you end up with Norma brass to reload! Considering what other companies want for their premium offerings, I think they are a steal...though I'd just as soon load 'em myself.

  13. #13

    Default .375 load

    I've had very good results with the Federal Premium 300 grain Trophy Bonded. No chasing of wounded game. Nothing wrong with the Nosler Partitions also.

  14. #14
    Member Matt's Avatar
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    270-grain or 300-grain TSX is all that you need. If you reload, even the better . . .

  15. #15
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    I use Federal Premiums with 300 grain Nosler Partitions in the .375 for hunting bears.
    For practice I use the Remington 270s. I shoot just enough of the Partitions to confirm zero before the season starts.
    Now what ?

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by stevelyn View Post
    I use Federal Premiums with 300 grain Nosler Partitions in the .375 for hunting bears.
    For practice I use the Remington 270s. I shoot just enough of the Partitions to confirm zero before the season starts.
    + 1......my rifle loves those 300 grainers!!!

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