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Thread: light sheep load for 325wsm ?

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    Default light sheep load for 325wsm ?

    Well, so I've been thinking (usually gets me in trouble or costs me some money ). I'd like to load up some light fast loads for my 325. Hornady has the 150gr interlock, Sierra and Speer have 150's as well, the Sierra 150 has a better BC than the Hornady but the 175gr Sierra has even better BC. I've been reading as much as I can about bullet ballistics, BC, SD, etc. I like the idea of a 3200 fps 150gr bullet. Should be one flat shooter. I used to shoot Hornady factory 150's out of a 7mm and they were very accurate and I took several deer and a small bull elk and recovered the bullet. Nice little mushroom.

    Anyway, what do you all think about 150's? My biggest concern is bullet fragmentation at shorter ranges and higher velocities.

    Opinions?
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  2. #2

    Default Bullet

    I would tend to believe that a lot of light 8mm bullets are designed for the mauser and as such might not be suitable for the higher velocities of the 325. The light weight premium bullets with a heavier jacket might be the answer to higher velocity.
    Just a thought.
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  3. #3

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    I loaded some of the 150's at almost 2900 in an 8x57 years ago for a "flat shooting" deer loads in the Southwest. Fortunately a coyote passed by at about 75 yards before a deer showed up and I popped him instead. Pretty good running shot in the left shoulder, and I was really impressed with the way he flopped down. When I went over and turned him over the right shoulder was completely GONE. Just a big gaping hole. My buddy came to see what the shooting was about, and together all we could find was right foreleg below the joint and a few scraps of hide and bone fragments.

    Drove around for three hours and finally found a box of factory loads and resighted with those to finish the hunt.

    I'm betting that 125 at 3200 would turn meat to vapor inside 100 yards.

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    I just emailed Hornady, Sierra and Speer to find out what the velocity ratings are for the 150's and 170. The 220gr Sierra Gamekings have a thicker jacket and harder core as they were designed specifically for the 8mm mag.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Default bullets

    Sounds like a great excuse for a new toy to me!

    If you were trying to put together a practice load to save a few bucks on premium hunting bullets, and maybe a little on your shoulder, or for predators, I'd say go for it.

    For hunting, though, my preference is one rifle, one load, one trajectory to remember or chart. Less moving parts = better for my small brain. No reason to make a F250 into a Porsche 911, both good tools, just built for different jobs.

    I don't know what bullet you are shooting out of the .325 (though I do remember from your previous posts that it worked pretty well on a sheep and a moose) nor do I know what you are getting in terms of muzzle velocity, which is what I would look at to make the decision.

    But, just for fun, I dug out a couple reloading manuals.

    According to the Sierra 50th anniversary manual, if you run a 220 grainer at 2900 fps, from a 200 yard zero, drop is 6.95" at 300 yards and 20.01" at 400 yards.

    If you start the 220 grainer at 2700 fps, with the same 200 yard zero, the drop at 300 is 8.19", and it loses 23.51" at 400.

    Now, here's what would happen if you start a 150 grain bullet at 3200 fps: With a 200 yard zero, it would drop 6.35" at 300 and 18.91" at 400.



    Again, it depends on what bullet/velocity you are working with now, but my bet would be that you likely won't see any meaningful difference in trajectory until you get to LRF range. At that point, you are correcting from known data --either clicks or subtension, your choice--so the slight difference in trajectory will not really matter too much.

    Buy a new rifle buy a new rifle buy a new rifle buy a new rifle buy a new rifle

    Just my .02
    Tom
    Last edited by Tom L; 01-11-2008 at 22:54. Reason: fix typos

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    Thanks Tom. Ya, I've only shot 200gr factory accubonds and they shoot great and killed a moose just as dead as a couple of sheep so far. Maybe it's just psychological but a 200 grainer seems like quite bit for a little sheep. It sure did a number on one critter. I've yet to load and shoot my own. Still a newbie reloader. I do have some 220's GK's loaded but haven't shot them yet. I have those in mind for moose and bear. I know how the 200 AB's fly, will try the 220 GK's and figured I might as well go to the lighter end to see what gives.

    I get your point about one bullet, etc. And it just may be that I end up with the 200 accubonds for everything. If it works don't fix it right!? Wait.... maybe 180 or 200 TSX's instead.....
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Well, handloading sure is fun, and a good way to spend both money and winter nights. It does give you a little more flexibility as well as the opportunity to tune a load to your rifle. It's addictive!

    Two questions:

    Have you thought about a Barnes TSX in .323" diameter? I've had great success with them in my .338WM and my .308Win...would be a good way to capitalize on light weight and velocity, if you do decide to go that way, and the bullet will hold together for sure.

    Just for curiosity's sake, have you shot the factory 200AB load over a chronograph? I'd be interested to hear what velocities the 325 gives.

    thanks for the information

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    No, I have not shot the 200AB's over a chrono. That is however the plan. Along with a very unscientific bullet test. I have been collecting phone books (got a whole pile of them!) and I intend to shoot a few different bullets into them over a chrono just to compare the bullets themselves. I may have some info regarding 200AB's chronoed. I'll have to check through my files. I think the fly slightly less than factory specs.

    Yup, I have considered the TSX's and may get to them some day. I am however not convinced that a guy needs the copper at 50 bucks per 50 when I can get others for 20 bucks for 100. Like Rem CoreLokt 185's. They've killed lots of game over the years. It seems that I could burn lots of copper doing load development.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Great idea! Would love to hear what you find (or see some photos?) with the phone book tests, and what the chrony tells you.

    I sure like the barnes stuff, but they are pricey. They don't come apart, though.
    Keep us posted

    Tom

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    Ya, I intended to do all this last fall but life threw us a curve and it got dropped on down the list of priorities, and of course now as I write this it's 25 below at my house. But, ya never know, we could get a chinook to blow in an have 40 above next week!
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Have Chrono and will travel....grin

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaCub View Post
    Have Chrono and will travel....grin

    Have phone will call
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Default 325 Sheep load.

    My old 8 Mag was deadly on Moose using the Rem 185 CL factory load. The 325 gets similar MV and I would think it would make a very good sheep load. I haven't tried them in my 325 yet but do plan on it. I also plan to load the TSX for Elk.

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    Snyd, in my mind, in a cartridge with the powder capacity and potency of the 325, I don't see any reason to stray far below 200 grainers for hunting - I doubt there is much ballistic advantage. The only reason would be if you were concerned about a scope bite if your rough-country shooting position with that light, potent rifle put you at risk for a scope bite.

    Furthermore, I bet you see less meat damage with the heavier bullets.

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    Thanks for the input Vek. You know I have been looking a numbers on paper and a 200 gr bullet out of the 325 really seems to hit the sweet spot. High BC, lots of energy left at long ranges and drop is not bad when zeroed at 200-275. I'm not sure 150's or 170's would much of an advantage. Maybe is my old 30-06 mind set, big heavies for moose, lighter loads for sheep. I was wondering too about meat damage. My scope has lots of eye relief and magnaporting has tamed it some so I'm not too concerned about scope bite (yet anyway!!) Thanks.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Default Controlled expansion will save meat.

    If you shoot a premium bullet that has controlled expansion, don't worry about excessive meat damage from heavier bullets. The excessive meat damage happens with heavier bullets that aren't designed for good expansion control (for example, the old Core Lokt bullets) So, you end up with more lead and jacket pieces that are flying around creating bloodshot meat.....like BrownBear's example.

    Sitka blacktails shot with a .338 and 225gr TSX die quickly but don't get blown up from a heavy bullet. All that's seen is a nice bullet diameter entry hole, about a 1-1/2" exit hole, and very disturbed stuff inbetween.

    I took a look at the Accubonds B.C., and the 200gr is 0.414. For comparison's sake (even though I read your steering away from the copper) the TSX 210gr B.C. is 0.404. Accubond SD is 0.250, and TSX is 0.263. (As a side note, the 185 gr TSX has a B.C. of 0.352.)

    Hey, 25 below will keep your barrel from getting too warm at the range!

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    HuntKodiak, makes sense. I was looking at the BC for the .323 200gr Accubond and it's .450, the 180gr TSX is .381. Were you looking at .338?
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    Default Oops

    Oh shucks, now that's embarrasing. When the reports first came out about the .325, I began comparing it (mentally) to the .338 since that's what I shoot a lot. Now who wants to try ramming a .338 bullet down a .325's hole?

    Guess I better go back and try Kindergarden again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HuntKodiak View Post
    ... Now who wants to try ramming a .338 bullet down a .325's hole?...
    I think Murphy could make that work
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    Snyd: What scope are you using? I am also considering getting my 325 A-bolt magnaported, My leupold rifleman 3x9 gets way to close to my face just shooting off the bench, cant imagine what would happen if I shot it prone! I guess as long as I hit the sheep I probably wouldn't care though. Anyone recommend a good smith to do the porting job in the valley/Anchorage area (prefferably on that is not backed up till october).

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