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Thread: cabin heaters....

  1. #1
    Member nahmint's Avatar
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    Default cabin heaters....

    I'm interested in feedback on cabin heaters... we're planning to have one installed when our boat arrives.... 220 Searunner ht/et. So far from personal experience I'm seriously looking at the Dickinson Newport 9000 btu propane unit (with fan)... comments/suggestions?

  2. #2

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    The best thing to do is to use search function on this forum for cabin heaters and then follow up with questions.

  3. #3
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    Default

    http://www.real4x4forums.com/Pinzgau...pic.php?t=3290
    here is a link to site i visit discussion on heaters: different type of vehicle these are mostly 24 volt but some of the guys have installed 12 v style.... seem to be on ebay regularly.
    but they are used for marine use.
    my last boat 34 footer 12 x 8 cabin + v berth , had dickinson pacifica ( diesel)....too big but worked great #1 setting would drive you out of the cabin.
    would get a smaller one if to do it again.
    my current boat 24 footer much smaller cabin....boat is new to me so i have not used it alot. has a toyo two burner diesel / kerosene stove that doubles as heater very nice.... here on land kept cabin comfortable in weather in the teens.
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
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  4. #4
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Default

    Check these out: http://www.scanmarineusa.com/wallas_furnaces.html

    The wallas 1300 would be a good match for your boat. I had this model in my 24 foot alaskan searunner and it worked very well. It runs on kerosene or 100% mineral spirits and just sipped the fuel.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  5. #5
    Member anonymous1's Avatar
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    Default Toyo 12v cabin heater

    you will like it

  6. #6

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    I've got a p 9000 in my harbercraft. Works great, but in april it's not quite enough.

  7. #7

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    Never liked propane on a boat, and with the fan you surely have dual battery banks with a switch. Propane has moisture associated with it too. My suggestion is a Toyotomi cabin heater. Small and compact, runs on diesel, and has a fan which blows air out of duct work if you wish.

  8. #8

    Default heat

    I have the same boat with the heater you are talking about. There is no moisture in the cabin. They draw the combustion air from outside and also exhaust to the outside. The heater is plenty for spring, summer, and fall. But it is a little light for winter king fishing. The best heater I have seen in these boats so far is the Toyo cabin heater. Its small, good remote thermostatic control and more than enough heat. But it was almost twice the price.

  9. #9
    Member rlcofmn's Avatar
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    Default

    Just a side note that is off the subject but i wanted to get the word out there that I am a HVAC installer and have ben doing some work on boat systems on the side so if anybody needs a hand on there cabin heaters shoot me a PM.

  10. #10
    Member nahmint's Avatar
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    Default

    Tomfishhunter: THKS for the first hand experience. It functioned really well in the Silver Streak 34 that I was aboard... and the weather was really foul. Actually, part of my concern was that the 9000 might be too large for the smaller cabin of the 220 Searunner...

  11. #11
    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
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    Default Go with the Wallas

    Nahmint, I've got the Wallas in my 26' (see sig). I run it on kerosene instead of diesel (either will work) because it burns cleaner, and won't leave black marks down the side of my cabin where it exhausts. It does great keeping the cabin warm, but I still chase condensation on the windows during wet weather. I'm hoping to address that two ways this year - 1) Rain-X on the interior of the windows (I use it on the outside, and will try it on the inside this year), and 12v defrosters for the windows themselves.

    If you search the website, I posted pictures of my install . . .

    My $.02 . . .Have fun!

    Cheers,
    SH

  12. #12
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    Talking Heat Calc formula

    Nahmint,
    A pretty safe heat calc formula for unisulated spaces might be to start with 10btu per cu. ft of space. We typically used a formula for housing for older 2x4 construction as 7btu per cu.ft. That was a quick rule-of-thumb down to about a -35F outdoor temp, figuring walls had R11, ceilings R19. Yep- them was the old days... A boat, as we all know, has basically no isulation, so heat loss is much greater, thus my lean to a 10btu/cu. ft. factor.
    Example: 8ft x 10ft space ; 8ft ceiling height. Thus: 8x10x8 = 640 cu. ft
    640 x 10 = 6400 btu.
    Take into account the fact that you probably won't be boating at -35F, the worst may be what-- 15-20F?? If you have an example of someone who has a very good set that up that works just right for their boat -- take the btu capacity of thier heater, divide it by the cu. ft of space and - presto!- you have a pretty good rule-of-thumb multiplier.

    As for Sierra Hotels comment about using Kerosene vs. diesel, it is a good one and thought I'd jump in here and point out something that is one of the most common mistakes people make:
    Diesel is not the same as "fuel oil". Yes, they smell the same, are refined almost the very same way. But there is one important difference: Diesel is refined for burning in diesel engines and contains additives and lubricants.
    Fuel oil- while very similar , is refined specifically for burning in heating appliances. People that purchase Diesel ( yes- even #1 diesel) at the gas pump and burn it in heaters will get sooting no matter what they do.
    Unless the manufacturer specifically states the recommended fuel is to be Diesel, Buy #1 fuel oil. Never- and this is key-never #2 fuel oil. Kerosene is concidered by many to be a cleaner version of fuel oil, but is technically different. It is still safe to use in these types of oil drip heaters. I have seen people use JP4 jet fuel as well. Don't do this, however. The Air Force was always doing that back in the 70's and early '80's at remote stations with thier old Preway oil pot burners. 'Caused many fires.
    Take it from an old oil heating guy & one who's job is to help the "experts" when they get stumped on their heating stuff. I typically stay in the background when providing help, but this is a great forum, so thought I'd jump in and add a little insight into an area where I see way too many mistakes made.

  13. #13
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    Talking Heat Calc formula

    Nahmint,
    A pretty safe heat calc formula for unisulated spaces might be to start with 10btu per cu. ft of space. We typically used a formula for housing for older 2x4 construction up here as 7btu per cu.ft. That was a quick rule-of-thumb down to about a -35F outdoor temp, figuring walls had R11, ceilings R19. Yep- them was the old days... A boat, as we all know, has basically no isulation, so heat loss is much greater, thus my lean to a 10btu/cu. ft. factor.
    Example: 8ft x 10ft space ; 8ft ceiling height. Thus: 8x10x8 = 640 cu. ft
    640 x 10 = 6400 btu.
    Take into account the fact that you probably won't be boating at -35F, the worst may be what-- +15-20F?? If you have an example of someone who has a very good set up that works just right for their boat -- take the btu capacity of thier heater, divide it by the cu. ft of space and - presto!- you have a pretty good rule-of-thumb multiplier.

    As for Sierra Hotels comment about using Kerosene vs. diesel, it is a good one, and thought I'd jump in here and point out something that is one of the most common mistakes people make, and this may help some people not only on thier boat, but perhaps with thier structure cabins as well:
    Diesel is not the same as "fuel oil". Yes, they smell the same, are refined almost the very same way. But there is one important difference: Diesel is refined for burning in diesel engines and contains additives and lubricants.
    Fuel oil- while very similar , is refined specifically for burning in heating appliances. People that purchase Diesel ( yes- even #1 diesel) at the gas pump and burn it in heaters will get sooting no matter what they do- the lubricants and additives don't combust fully and are the main contributors to the sooting. Unless the manufacturer specifically states the recommended fuel is to be "Diesel" , Buy #1 fuel oil. Never- and this is key-never #2 fuel oil. Kerosene is concidered by many to be a cleaner version of #1, but is technically different. It is still safe to use in these types of oil drip heaters. I have seen people use JP4 jet fuel as well. Don't do this, however. The Air Force was always doing that back in the 70's and early '80's at remote stations with thier old Preway oil pot burners. 'Caused many fires.
    Take it from an old oil heating guy & one who's job is to help the "experts" when they get stumped on their heating stuff. I typically stay in the background when providing help in my trade, but this is a great forum, so thought I'd jump in and add a little insight into an area where I see way too many of the same mistakes being made on a regular basis by people who just don't know any better. It's not really thier fault either, it's just that what was once common knowledge, is not necessarily "common" anymore.

  14. #14
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    Default Sorry Gang!

    Sorry for the duplicate-- something hung up when I sent the first & wasn't quite done...

  15. #15
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Default

    Unfortunately it is tough to get #1 heating fuel in many places of this state. Many tank farms in rural areas supply #1 diesel only...to both the pumps and home heating fuel. It has been further complicated by the new ULSD diesel and the fact the fuel plants still haven't figured out how to make this stuff work reliably at -20F and below temps.

  16. #16

    Default Heaters

    Take a look at either the Webasto or Espar. They are both a great product they will make it sauna hot inside the cabin. Get one size larger then what you think you need.

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