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Thread: rod and reel combo question

  1. #1
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    Question rod and reel combo question

    I am new at this fly fishing game and am shopping for a rig for silvers..my concern is..can a person put, say a Ross reel on a G. Lommis rod? Dumb question, but it looks a a big investment, so I dont want to screw up. Any advise on size, type, etc. would also be appreciated
    Thanks!

  2. #2

    Default You bet!

    You certainly could team up a Ross on a G-Loomis, and that would be a formidable setup for sure. But, IMO maybe a bit on the high end for a first setup.

    I think an 8wt would be ideal for silvers and could also double as a Red setup as well.

    Basically when you match up a reel with a rod, depending on which piece you purchase first you can match them accordingly by size....for instance if you get an 8wt G-Loomis rod, then you'd want a Ross reel that was matched up for 6-8wt rods.

    Cabelas has a lot of combos for sale from entry level right up to high end....I might check them out if your still unsure about matching up rod to reel.

    -sc

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    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Yes, you can. Pick a rod. Pick a reel. Pick a line. Put 'em all together and go fish. You'll find that several of the quality reel manufacturers do not even make rods - one of my favorite reels is a Teton. And some of the great rod companies make reels that are way overpriced and not that great of quality. From my experience, I never liked St. Croix or Sage reels. Love their rods though. In fact, if Ross makes rods, I've never seen them.

    As for size of rod for silvers, how big of water are you going to be fishing? Typically, a 9 footer is fine for just about everything. I've known people to go up to 9 1/2 or even 10 footers for float tubing big lakes, but I prefer 9 foot. As for weight, I'd go with a minimum of 7 on silvers, but if you are new to it, I'd go with heavier or you'll be replacing that broken rod pretty quick. A loomis with a good backbone, you could go with an 8 wt., but for a beginner, I'd recommend a 9 wt.

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    Default Thanks!

    Great advice..now that I look closer a Cabelas catalog, I see there is no Ross rods. I think I will go for a 9 foot 8 weight, but I still am wondering if the reel needs to a "salt water" one. I know I have totalled out more than one spinning reel fishing in the ocean,( which I intend to do on occasion with this fly rod)..most of my fishing will be either on the Kenai river , Homer spit area, Russian River, the Seward bay area, etc. Will a fresh water reel hold up in salt water? Any thoughts on this subject?

    Thanks again..this is a great source of info!

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    Quote Originally Posted by old yeller View Post
    Great advice..now that I look closer a Cabelas catalog, I see there is no Ross rods. I think I will go for a 9 foot 8 weight, but I still am wondering if the reel needs to a "salt water" one. I know I have totalled out more than one spinning reel fishing in the ocean,( which I intend to do on occasion with this fly rod)..most of my fishing will be either on the Kenai river , Homer spit area, Russian River, the Seward bay area, etc. Will a fresh water reel hold up in salt water? Any thoughts on this subject?

    Thanks again..this is a great source of info!
    If you are looking at Ross reels, I believe they are all saltwater safe. Most reels these days are. I agree with Charlie that you seem to be looking at some high end stuff for a beginner. Not that it won't serve you well, but learning to drive in a Ferrari is not necessarily for everybody. I don't have any Ross reels, so I can't comment on their durability, but I believe they are great reels.

    I would not necessarily look at reels that have the word "saltwater" in their name, as those tend to be more of the really high end reels that are made for chasing tarpon, tuna, etc. (Billy Pate reels are an example of this). If you are looking at the Cabela's page, the reels that are safe in the salt will generally have it in their description. These generally are made of bar stock aluminum and other stainless parts.

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    Default Sound advise

    Thanks for the pointers..you are right..there is a slew of good looking stuff in the catalog more reasonable ..I think I will backtrack, get a low or mid range 9 foot, 8 weight with a decent 8 weight reel and go for it!

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    www.rossreelsworldwide.com good reels for good prices
    I'd recomend a tfo 8wt maybe a lefty kreh signature rod
    I'd also reccomend a multi tip line from rio or scientific anglers
    I'd also reccomend a ton of purple egg sucking leaches
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Default As far as salt water reels....

    Just toss your reels in a bucket of fresh water at the end of the day. I fished for bones in Belize a few years back, using my 8 wt. steelhead rig(I live in MN), and that's what I'd do at the end of each day. When I got home, I gave my line and reel a pretty good washing. That was 4 years ago, and the only problem I've had with that set-up was breaking the rod on a king in Lake Creek this summer .

  9. #9

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    BM,

    WHere bouts in MN? I'll be back that way this spring if ya want to chase some crappies or run up for steelies. Coming home to turkey hunt, if we draw in MN, Wi...Either way heading to NE, Ks, maybe MO again. Be April time frame. Just north of the cities, where 35e and 35w meet.

    INstead of soaking in salt water, rinse them This helps get the salt off the reel, instead of dunking a reel into water only to pull it back out of salt water. Soaking does help loosing things. I also will strip my reels down every few days or if on a short trip after the trip, clean them well, regrease/lube them and storem for the next vacation.

  10. #10
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Here is a deal...

    There is a smoking deal on Sierra Trading Post right now. The rod is a Powell, my buddy bought one for our float on the Goodnews this past Sept and it is very, very nice. A true fast action rod (4 piece), comes in a case, sharp looking black rod, and has lifetime warranty. And only cost $119! I had a $600 Scott rod and used his one day on the trip. Much more similar in performance than I would like to admit. The reels, I own personally and can say with certainty are great. They are Lamson Velocity. Very good reputation. They are marked way down to $169 for the 7/8. That reel would be perfect on the Powell 8 wt rod. Buy an extra reel so you can have two different lines. That would be ideal. Two different sink tips, or a floating line and a sinking line. You will need two reels. Also, if you have a failure, you have a back up. Dont let people tell you to get a cheap starter set. They are junk in my opinion. If you are planning on doing some regular fishing, get something decent and you wont be spending more money trying to upgrade when you learn you bought junk. I made that mistake, as have many. This 8 weight set up will cost you $480 and that is with two reels. A realistic retail price to buy a set up of this quality would be atleast $750. Any fly fishing questions you have, send me a pm and I will tell you what you need to know or send you links to info that will. I just started few years ago myself and there is a lot to learn. But it is very simple when you get the basics figured out. But complicated if you dont have the right insights. Here is a link to the rod and reel on www.sierratradingpost.com. You would not regret this purchase.

    http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/9...d-4-Piece.html

    http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/9...-7and8-Wt.html
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  11. #11
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Thumbs up 10% off...

    I heard of this website, supercoupon, just today while looking for camera lenses. I looked up Sierra Trading Post on it and they have a 10% off any order over $85 offer. You would have to go to the link below and click on "10%off valid till 2/4" and it will open Sierra Trading Post website. Add items to your cart and when you click on your cart, the 10% is taken off. That will drop the price of the rod/reels by about $50. Now that is really a heck of a deal. Anyone can use this (till 2/4).

    http://www.supercoupon.com/Coupons/H..._Trading_Post/
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  12. #12

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    I wouldnt recommend a cheap starter kit either but 480 bucks for a rod, 2 reels and no lines backing flies leaders or anything else might be a little much for the average person to swallow all at once.

    To be blunt, there is no need for more then one reel now with the verstip lines, and consider they are 100 bucks, buy going this round you are saving yourselve cash hand over fist, figure in another reel, or spare spools, backing and lines at 60+ bucks a pop!

    I still think a TFO is the best bang for the buck on the market in the last few years. Has the warrenty all the big rods has, and has the quality they all have at a minute fraction of a big name rod wholesale price!

    As for reels, the nice thing about them is a quality reel used can be had for almost nothing compared to new prices. Take your time, read up on what they were, and you'll likely make a wise choice and get a smokin deal for it. And dont let used fly reels scare you, there is little to break in most of them. And when something goes bad as did in my system 2, burned the drags sight fishing kings this last june. I emailed SA and without question they sent repair parts, I asked for an address and what it would cost, a week later the parts arrived free of charge and no shipping needed!!!! If I didnt like my Ross so much, all of my reels would be SA. have 2 system 2l's and one system 2 picked all but one up in trade. Good stuff!

    That is a smokin deal though....then again, what's it going to cost with shipping? Now that SW is around, that does become a factor. WHere as before the local guys charging shipping plus 2 times the mark up, shopping online was a deal normally. Dont get me wrong I like promoting the local guys, but I dont always agree on the mark up to the point it's still cheaper to buy and ship priority mail online then it is to drive a couple miles and walk out with it.

  13. #13
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    Default True...

    Point taken that you don't "need" two reels. Heck, we dont need many things at all when you think about it. The main reason I suggested getting two was that the Lamson reels sell for $230-240 and they are $160 on Sierra Trading Post (while they last). It would cost someone almost that much to order a spool only. So why the heck not get two reels. And I disagree strongly about having one multi-tip line. Not knocking them all together, but I would greatly prefer two different lines on two different spools. One of which can have several sink tips perhaps, but I would definately prefer two lines. I actually have 2 reels and 2 extra spools for my 7, 8, and 10 wt set ups. I have 4 different lines on all of them and fishing for silvers on the Goodnews River float this past Aug/Sept, I used every one of my 8 wt lines. And the Temple Fork rods you suggested cost more than the Powell rod I told the guy about. I have a TFO rod and I am not nearly as fond of them as most. The Powell rod is a bad as# rod. I have used it and know the difference in a nice rod and a junker. Then again, we all have our preferences. Assuming one could afford to spend $450, there is no better deal out there. That is all I am saying.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  14. #14

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    the problem is that 450 buck price tag isnt completely honest either....consider the costs of lines, leaders if you use them for salmon as I don't, and backing, you're pushing 600 bucks for this setup!

    Cant say anything about the powell, but also having some high end rods, the tfo for the money will do what I want it to with ease. And you're partially right, it can be more then this powell, or as is the case in the lefty's signature rods....less then 100 bucks, kinda apples to oranges here though would have to cast both side by side to see what one feels better to you as the price is really pretty dang nominal, but the tfo IS cheaper And if you wanted to go up one more to the PRO series they are a little more then this powell by 30 bucks or so.... Everything else is pretty much higher then the powell though from there that I've seen.

  15. #15
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    Default Dang it...

    You are wearing me down here. While I hate junker starter kits, I can appreciate what you say about $450 being a lot of money for some people to spend on a fly outfit. True. It all depends on how much fly fishing the guy is planning on doing if you ask me. If he got a TFO rod and a mid level SA reel, he would be ahead of many beginners. I would not call that set up "junk" by any means and he could have a rod/reel/line for around $200. But I will say this as well, that set up will weigh 40% more than a high end outfit, the rod will not cast as well, and the drag will not be as consistant. People always want to talk about how strong a drag is. Truth is, most are strong enough. The reason I say consistent instead of strong is because it is the slight hesitation in a drag where it all of a suddenly has more friction than a 1/10 of a second earlier that snaps your tippet. A higher end reel is not only stronger (usually) but it is more consistent. And the frequency of a rod will dictate the general ease of it to cast with. Not just how stiff it is or how fast. These are subtle nuances that do not get much attention in budget rods/reels. It would be crazy to think that they would. How could they sale them so cheaply if they did. These are issues that a beginner would never think of. But when that person got more serious about their flyfishing, they would immediately start realizing how the rod, reel, and sometimes even more importantly, line, affects how they cast. It is a simple question of when, not if. So from my way of thinking, someone is saving money if they get the right gear in the first place. Buy an outfit that you will grow into, rather than out of. All this depends on two things. One, how expensive you think $500 is for a fly rod set up. And two, how willing you are to deal with the inherent disadvantages of lesser equipment. Make no mistake about it, if a $35 fly reel performed as nice as my $350 Ross Evolution 3.5's, I would surely own them. And if budget rods would lay out line like my $600 Scott S3s rods, I would have a closet full. And if both the last sentences were true, I would have a very happy wife. But in reality, there is no comparison. Its like people say, "Why spend a lot of money on a car as long as it gets me from point A to point B". The people that say that are usually driving a crappy car. Are they not? Drive a Corvette or a Chevette. Its your choice.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  16. #16

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    well let me refrain a little here and apologize for wearing you down.

    I'm sure we both have done very similiar things getting people and teaching people the great sport of fly fishing over the years. It seems every summer I find myself teaching and helping people get started or answering questions like this either face to face or via emails. Like I said I'm sure you've done the same.

    I do have a couple simple quick questions and replies to this last thread and I'll let it lie where it does.... And I'll try and do it without copying your hole post....

    "These are issues that a beginner would never think of. But when that person got more serious about their flyfishing, they would immediately start realizing how the rod, reel, and sometimes even more importantly, line, affects how they cast. It is a simple question of when, not if..........

    "Why spend a lot of money on a car as long as it gets me from point A to point B". The people that say that are usually driving a crappy car. Are they not? Drive a Corvette or a Chevette. Its your choice."


    The question is here, so just what WAS your first car? A vette or a mopar?

    The fact of the matter is, it's a big undertaking for MOST people, no not all people, but most to buck up this kind of money. I do know powell's reputatoin though I've never casted one I'd like to some day. And I know the lamson line a little bit and sure they are a sweet reel, though like you're saying both reels the SA's, my old ross G3, and your Lamsons will be fireburners likely for a long time to come. The truth is, do you need to spend big money to get into fly fishing? And the reality of sticker shock with all the other nuances that you could use or gotta have make that 450 tag jump profoundly. Often over looked goods that are not cheap when all purchased at once though likely many will be.

    So if a guy has the money to burn, go for it...the lamson is a quality reel of the likes you'll probably never replace in your lifetime or mine, which to me speaks loudly as is the powells, sages, loomis, orvis and a host of other great rod builders. I do consider the tfo's a more entry level rod atleast there low end rods but I dont shun the quality of them. However the price tag that goes with two reels, lines backing etc etc etc needs to be brought up and looked at up front. It's nice to have a ton of lines when the fact is, one line will do the trick for most cases. Along with some cortland leadcore you can make some short 1 3 5 or so foot leaders as add ons to your already sink tips or floating lines and get teh same job done and likely pay for a bush flight with your savings to some snazzy place we all dream of, like the good news.

    Weight can be overcome by balance. Or maybe some seriously big forearms Honestly I dont pay heed to any of it till I get to my 10 wts. Ad the big system 2 on there and they are tanks for sure!

    Lets not take into account that most of us, when we got into fly fishing realized we needed flies to showcase on the end of our fly lines and many of us took up fly tying at the same time, which in turn means more money spent in the outset, but over time great savings from buying flies from local shops, unless you are the kind to purchase umqua's or other foreign markted flies that desintigrate rather ubruptly!

    So starting from nothing here to becoming a fly fisherman is a choice of your pocket book. I person do own high end rods as well as low end rods...all of which cast well and some for a specific purpose. Maybe I'm not the quality of caster to notice the harmonic dampening features of a 600 dollar rod over a cheap 100 tfo or visa versa. I do however know quite quickly a good rod when I cast one, and I wouldnt recommend junk to someone in a public forum or face to face! And I love deals, however as this thread has shown a lil more frugal with what I end up spending in the end for one outfit.

  17. #17
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Smile TradBow...

    TradBow,
    What are you trying to say? ha ha. Your right about ONE thing, it is a lot of money for some people to spend on a fly fishing outfit. If I had been more sensitive to that in the first place, I would not have hurt everyone's feelings. We all have our different taste. And we have a rather varied market to accommodate them. There are a lot of mediocrity whores out there. I am just not one of them. It just comes down to a matter of personal preference. At the end of the day, we are all just a bunch of men standing in the river waving a stick. And that ain't so bad.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  18. #18
    Member jmg's Avatar
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    I learned to flyfish with a 5 weight Plueger rod and reel combo that my wife's grandparents bought me for Christmas about 13 years ago. It came with line, leaders, and a video on how to cast. I can't begin to tell you the number of trout I caught with that rod, but I would put it in the thousands. After my wife caught it in the car door - twice - it was time to retire it. I still have the reel and use it as a backup when people come to visit, etc.

    When I "learned" to fly fish, I didn't know what a good rod felt like, so I had nothing to compare to. I learned to cast that rod extremely well and this resulted in many, many fish. Since that time, I now bought 4 St. Croix Ultra Legends in various weights (some of my favorite rods of all time), a couple of Rainshadow IM8 rods I built, and I am currently building an 8 wt. Sage Xi2. I think I am at 10 fly rods right now. These "better" rods are fantastic. They are light, crisp, more sensitive, but putting my skills to them that I learned on the "lesser" rod makes my cast that much better. I also have several reels now that I paid well over $200 apiece for. They are smooth, the drag is great, and a pleasure to fish. But, I also am an expert when it comes to palming the reel because my first Pflueger never had a "drag" to it. I might have never learned this skill had I started with a Ross or other top notch reel.

    Some people say start low for getting into it, while others say don't waste your money on cheap because you will buy expensive later. I am in the "get whatever you can afford" category and do NOT feel pushed into buying higher end stuff because the fishing experience won't be the same if you don't. Many people, especially those outside the flyfishing world, will often remark about the snobbyness of flyfisherman. I must admit, when I first saw posts here to drop $450 just to get into it, I sort of felt that way too.

    I love the high end stuff I have after all these years. But looking back, I would not have taken it in the beginning even if I had the chance. I am glad I learned on the lesser outfits because it taught me skills I probably would not have otherwise learned. I also learned to tie flies on a Thomspon A vise that cost probably less than $20.

    I used to have a boss that was fascinated by my hobby of tying and flyfishing. He wanted to get into it too, including building rods. I taught him how to build rods, but he would only go for top notch stuff. Never had a rod before. His first rod was a St. Croix Ultra Legend with titanium guides and a full titanium reel seat that cost over $100 alone. I told him over and over not to do it, but he did. He matched it up with a Garmin reel that ran him another couple hundred bucks. He went on to build two or three more similar rods, all matched with top notch reels. Not long after, I moved to Alaska. I can count the number of times he has fished with those rods on one hand, and at least one he has likely never used. Good lesson for others.

    Get what you can't afford, but don't feel that you have to have better, better, better. Just get what's in the budget and start learning to use it. As my interest grew, I felt the desire to spend more on better stuff. But I find that things I think I am interested in right away and cost a ton of money, tend to be kind of a drag because I feel I "have to do it" to justify what I already spent.

    Just go fish!!!

  19. #19
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Smile Agreed...

    jmg,
    Lots of wisdom in that post! I agree that any rod/reel will get you started. I was just having some fun with Tradbow. As for budget, it was never established. $450 is not a lot of money to some people. And to some it certainly is. And of course, as with any online advice, a certain amount of projection is expected. My personal experience was that the starter kits were junk. I got the Cabelas Prestige kit. Like $119 for the rod/reel/line/case. I got a St Croix Legend Ultra 6 weight soon after and there was no looking back. That is a fine mid level (price wise) rod. I have went on to get some Scott, RL Winston, and Sage rods. They are the very best in my opinion. I look for deals and got most of them for about 60% of retail. Some good deals on Ebay, but caution must be used of course. I got the Scott S3s for $300 (retail over $600) when Cabelas put them in the bargain cave. They don't go on sale often but sometimes you can find a deal. Mostly when a new model is coming out. As for fly fisherman being snobs. Yeah. I think so too. I am 34 years old and only know one other person my age that fly fishes. In the south, it is all about the largemouth bass. Not as much fly fishing as other parts of the country. The ones that do are in the western part of the state in the Smoky Mountains. You know the type, Filson hat, leather reel cases, 7 ft 2 wt bamboo rods. Don't even bother asking what fly they are using. They don't want you to be close enough to speak to them for that matter. It sucks. While I value my space as well, I was raised to treat people better than that. I wish fly fisherman were a friendly bunch that sat around shooting the sh*t and swapping stories. But from my rather limited experience, that is often not the case. I am sure others experiences will vary. That is just what I have been exposed to.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  20. #20
    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
    jmg,
    While I value my space as well, I was raised to treat people better than that. I wish fly fisherman were a friendly bunch that sat around shooting the sh*t and swapping stories. But from my rather limited experience, that is often not the case. I am sure others experiences will vary. That is just what I have been exposed to.
    With that said, and related to getting a rod, I got into building my own and never looked back. Am going to post on the forum that I have an old L.A. Garcia video on rod building that if anybody wants it, its free.

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