Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27

Thread: Bayliner question

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fairfield CA
    Posts
    5

    Default Bayliner question

    Hi
    I am in CA getting ready to retire to AK in four years.
    Bayliners are popular in Northern CA, I like the 2556 fly bridge, but I'm not sure if this is a good all around fishing, sight-seeing boat for Kachemak Bay.
    Wondering the cost of maintaining a boat that size.
    What are the costs of insurance, taxes, registration etc. per year?

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ak2012 View Post
    Hi
    I am in CA getting ready to retire to AK in four years.
    Bayliners are popular in Northern CA, I like the 2556 fly bridge, but I'm not sure if this is a good all around fishing, sight-seeing boat for Kachemak Bay.
    Wondering the cost of maintaining a boat that size.
    What are the costs of insurance, taxes, registration etc. per year?
    As about the 2556 on the Bayliner's news group http://www.baylinerownersclub.org/forum/

    I think it would be a good boat for that purpose, but I don't know how often you would use the flybridge. I have a Bayliner 2452 that I use lots our of Whittier and sometimes Seward and rarely (too far to drive) Kachemak Bay.

    Cost of maintaining a boat that size depends on how much of the work you can do yourself, how often repairs (or maintenance) are needed. Bayliners cost no more to maintain or repair (Mercruiser engines are Mercruiser engines, regardless of what boat they're put into, e.g.) than any other fiberglass boat.

    Insurance, etc. is minimal, especially if compared to the overall cost of boating (launch fees, fuel, etc.). But most find that the cost is worth it. Plus, you have a nice, long winter every year to save up for the next boating season.

  3. #3
    New member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fairfield CA
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Thanks for the info.
    We are probably getting in over our head, having been in boats but never owned one. We understand it is a learning experience, and it's nice to know there are people out there that already have the knowledge we need to aquire, and are willing to share.
    We figure why come all the way to Alaska and not be able to be on the water. We are trying to reach a happy medium for my wife, who wants a comfortable, sightseeing boat, and me who wants to fish.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    516

    Default HArbor slip???

    Hey just to let you know. I belive the wait for a slip in Homer is 3-5 years. Im sure most Seward, Whittier, Valdez are also a good wait.
    Just thought I'd let you know.
    Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.

  5. #5
    New member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fairfield CA
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Wow..good to know.
    Guess I'll be towing for a good long while!

  6. #6
    Member kjashen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Juneau, Alaska
    Posts
    141

    Thumbs up 2556 trophy

    years ago I owned a 1989 2556 trophy bayliner. Probably the most comfortable boat I've ever owned. lots of room inside and a flat large back deck with no engine hump to take up space. deep v hull was good in the ocean. 9.9 4 stroke kicker made it troll great and the 350 v8 mercruiser had us up at 25 knots @ 10gal/hr. with a 105 gal main tank had lots of range. With a head and wallas stove/heater my wife was happy too...which is the most important part. used the flybridge every sunny day in the summer and could direct the fishing action from there. plus it was good for anchoring as my wife would control the boat from topside and be able to hear what I wanted her to do.

  7. #7

    Default

    It's just my opinion from experience...Bayliners are popular because they are cheap and plentiful. But they are cheap for a reason. And there are a lot for sale for a reason.

    Bayliner's build quality has gotten better lately and they have some nicer models now, but they really made some poor quality junk that handled very poor in rough seas. My last experience in a Bayliner with a following sea in Kachemak Bay was one I'd like to forget. If we would've had a top-heavy fly bridge we probably would've pitched over.

    If you've never owned a boat and want to use one in Kachemak Bay, I'd recommend something aluminum. You can beach it for clam digging and beach combing, and it will be more forgiving if you hit a rock or even on the trailer or at the launch. It will clean up better and handle the Alaskan weather better. Plus it will fit the need of a "fishing" boat better for you. There are some good used ones around locally, and also many local boat builders who make fantastic boats.

    Again, just my opinion. Not a Bayliner fan.

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fairfield CA
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Thanks for the advice.
    We are already exploring other possibillities.
    I'm thinking more like a 2359 Hardtop Trophy.
    It will cost more, but we can have the best of both worlds.
    I like the live-well and can hose it out. no carpet.
    The only thing is it's quite a bit smaller(which I am thinking I can handle it better), and the head is directly under the V-berth.
    We were wondering is that something we would be smelling if we sleep in there? The 2556 has a complete seperate head.
    I would love to get an alumunim boat, but this is a team venture, and I don't think it will fly!
    Kachamak bay sounds pretty unforgiving, we will do much more research, and perhaps go even smaller?
    Are we too green for 20' over?

  9. #9

    Default

    I went from a 16-ft. inflatable to a 24-ft. Bayliner. At first, the Bayliner seemed monsterous. But the longer I have it, the smaller it seems to get
    I really don't think you'd have a problem going to a 20+ ft. boat.

    If you're seriously looking into getting a Bayliner, then ask your specific Bayliner questions at the link I provided earlier (if you haven't already).

  10. #10

    Default Bayliner opinion.

    Some Bayliners handle seas great, some are pretty scary. Ford makes many models. If you are wanting to haul a cord of firewood, I would not recommend a Taurus to do the job. That being said, the Trophy line does pretty good. A Bayliner is not the Mercedes of boats, but some sure provide a lot of fun at a reasonable cost. I would not charter with a Bayliner but I don't hesitate to use it for light duty family times.

    I use a 24' Trophy in K-Bay with no problems. The truth of the matter is I'm quite impressed with it's sea handling capabilities. Beware though as some are designed for inland waterways and some for offshore.

    I do not beach the boat. I pull up to within 10' or so from the beach and my kids and wife climb into the little inflatable and paddle to shore. My oldest paddles back out to the boat and we go out to deeper water and set the anchor. We then paddle back into shore. Pretty easy and harmless.

    Happy boating.

  11. #11

    Default I dont beach either...

    The only time I beached my aluminum 21 footer I had to wait for the tide to come back up and lost valuble fishing time. I used a bayliner for a couple years. It really didn't like the big seas much but it handled better than my Lund sport cabin. My 21 foot Striper is most awesome. A trip to Montague Island is a breeze.
    To answer the ? Sure! Bring that boat up. If you dont like it, go to plan B.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    344

    Default

    I also have a 24' Bayliner Trophy with the Alaska bulkhead. I bought it last spring and love it!! Two to three of us guys go out for 3 day+ excursions and the size is just right. Handles rough water great and is very comfortable to sleep in. Aft deck is plenty big enough and trailers nicely. I personally wouldn't want a flying bridge because that's where I stow my raft, shrimp pots and bouys. Absolutely check out the link that skydiver provided - there are people from all over the world with knowledge of Bayliners and they will gladly answer any questions. Happy boating and congratulations on retiring to the best place on earth .

  13. #13
    New member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fairfield CA
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Hey thanks to all for the info.
    We will check out the website for sure.
    My wife watched a video of a couple that goes from Seattle to the inside passage in a 22' C Dory.
    Looks like a real nice boat. We really like the Trophy as well.
    Alot to learn, thanks again.

  14. #14

    Default

    I went with a buddy on his 22-ft. C-Dory last summer from Whittier to Cordova to Valdez to Whittier. Great little boat and got about 4-5 mpg which is about twice what my 24-ft boat gets. The only thing about the C-Dory is that if the water is rough they will pound you hard. And on a 22-footer, there is no head (there is a porta potty). They are pricey, too, but they hold their value well.

  15. #15

    Default

    As for your question about the 2556 being a good boat for alaskan waters, I had a 24' trophy offshore before this one and it was a good boat for alaskan waters, then moved up to the 1993 2556 witch is far better, its a 9'6 wide boat witch makes it more stable. I can run 17-19 knots at 12gph with 4 people and gear in 3-5 foot chops and still have a smooth ride. It is a very comfortable boat in the winter(I have a diesel heater in it). It has the 5.7 260hp with a bravo 2 outdrive. It has a indoor bathroom(witch the wife loves) with hot water and shower, we can go out 3-5 days with no problems. Top speed is 42mph.Out of homer one year I had 15' following seas and 30mph winds it was nasty but the boat handled it very well. I say its a excellent boat for alaska at a great value.

  16. #16

    Default Bayliner $

    To me it ends up being how much money you want to spend.
    I went from a 18' inflatable to a 20'Trophy Cutty to a 22' Explorer. It does very well in the seas it was designed to handle, so far up to only 6' for me.
    Been in 30' in a 600' and it was a ride, more than likely if it rough enough to scare you, you shouldn't be there.
    22' sleeps 4 easy, Wallas stove, sink, 4cyl Volvo-40gal tank, table it's warm and comfortable and found in great shape for $10k <-- that's what sold me.

  17. #17
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    You need to figure out exactly what use you'll be putting the boat to. Will it be primarily day trips, fishing trips, multi day trips, hunting trips, etc??? How long will the trips be, how much are you willing to spend on fuel? How many people will be on board the boat? And I'm sure at this point you don't know what your typical use will be, and you won't know until you've been boating for a few years up here. Which is all good and fine as you can buy a few year old used boat in good shape, use it for a few years to figure out what you do and don't like, and sell it pretty much for what you put into it.

    What you use the boat for has a huge berring on what design will be best for your use.

    There is an interesting addage in boating that holds a fair bit of truth, and that is generally the bigger the boat is, the less you use it. To me a 22-24' semi V cabin cruiser that is relatively light with a 100-150 hp o/b is about the best compromise for a Southcentral alaska boat. It's small enough to easily trailer, comfortable enough for a couple to spend long weekends to a week at sea, fuel efficient enough to get you somewhere interesting and back without burning 100+ gallons of fuel and can cruise around 20-25 knots. With the strong tides we have, and the often long runs to get to fish, speed really is an important attribute.

    The C-dory 22 is a great little cruiser, and it would be perfect if it had a semi-v bottom. But it's a flat bottom hull which gives it great economy on those rare (and I do mean rare) glass calm days, but will beat the heck out of you in the typical 2' chop and you'll throttle way down on the not untypical 4' chop.

    No offense to bayliner owners, but I think you'll find the folks that are serious boaters and fisherman, and spend alot of time on the water, do not run bayliners.

  18. #18

    Default

    Cd22s are not bad in 2 foot chop. However, they get progressively worse from there. I know, I have one. But, they will get you back; and even going slow at say 10 knots you will get 5mpg. You're not going to get that in bayliner of the same size

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    110

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    No offense to bayliner owners, but I think you'll find the folks that are serious boaters and fisherman, and spend alot of time on the water, do not run bayliners.
    Now that you just happen to bring this up, Paul, why don't you go ahead and explain to my wife, my banker, my insurance agent, the local marine store, the harbor and the rest of the Bayliner owners out there about us not being serious. I believe that I'm just as serious about boating as you or anyone else on this forum....or am I the exception? Mike

  20. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    You need to figure out exactly what use you'll be putting the boat to. Will it be primarily day trips, fishing trips, multi day trips, hunting trips, etc??? How long will the trips be, how much are you willing to spend on fuel? How many people will be on board the boat? And I'm sure at this point you don't know what your typical use will be, and you won't know until you've been boating for a few years up here. Which is all good and fine as you can buy a few year old used boat in good shape, use it for a few years to figure out what you do and don't like, and sell it pretty much for what you put into it.

    What you use the boat for has a huge berring on what design will be best for your use.

    There is an interesting addage in boating that holds a fair bit of truth, and that is generally the bigger the boat is, the less you use it. To me a 22-24' semi V cabin cruiser that is relatively light with a 100-150 hp o/b is about the best compromise for a Southcentral alaska boat. It's small enough to easily trailer, comfortable enough for a couple to spend long weekends to a week at sea, fuel efficient enough to get you somewhere interesting and back without burning 100+ gallons of fuel and can cruise around 20-25 knots. With the strong tides we have, and the often long runs to get to fish, speed really is an important attribute.

    The C-dory 22 is a great little cruiser, and it would be perfect if it had a semi-v bottom. But it's a flat bottom hull which gives it great economy on those rare (and I do mean rare) glass calm days, but will beat the heck out of you in the typical 2' chop and you'll throttle way down on the not untypical 4' chop.

    No offense to bayliner owners, but I think you'll find the folks that are serious boaters and fisherman, and spend alot of time on the water, do not run bayliners.
    I'm sorry, but you have no idea what you're talking about. I won't be drawn into a Bayliner debate, but do you think that as many (and there are many) Bayliners as there are in Alaska that they are all permanently tied to the docks? OK. I'm done.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •