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Thread: Clean brand new brass ...or not?

  1. #1
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    Default Clean brand new brass ...or not?

    I figured that some newb must've asked this question before but a quick search didn't show up anything obvious... So here goes.

    Does brand new brass from the manufacturer need cleaning? Is there lube on the brass that I can't detect with fingers and might influence something?

    Thanks,
    Brian

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    Default I don't...

    I have not cleaned (tumbled) new brass, but I do full-length size and do some other steps before use.

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    After full length sizing you will need to clean off the sizing lube, however you manage that.

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    Default

    I wouldn’t go so far as to say that its required, but I do toss mine into the tumbler for awhile after I resize them. I guess if I didn’t have the tumbler I would just wipe them off with a paper towel after loading. I don’t know this for fact, but have always thought it would take a fair amount of oily residue to effect a powder charge. When I resize my bottle neck cases I use a “Q” tip with some of that Hornady paste lube on the inside of the neck, and after tumbling around for a couple of hours have never noted any residue left on the cases.
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

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    Question

    I assumed it was understood that one wipes off the sizing lube after running the case through the die...I use a paper towel and Q-tip. Hopefully, I didn't mislead anyone with my previous post saying that I always full length size but don't tumble new brass.

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    My reloading bench isn't set up yet and the garage only half-cleaned but progress is being made ...step one will be inspecting the first batch of brass that I'll reload, then I'll run them through the full-length resizer and measure them. I doubt the Starline stuff needs flash hole deburring, but I'll check and I'll uniform the primer pockets and measure lengths before I go for it. Then I'll clean them up and rub git'r-done all over'm... and get down to the range!

    Thanks,
    Brian

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    Talking Cleaning new brass

    You don't need to clean new brass and no there is no lube on them. Just rip the bag open and start loading. You need to run the necks over the expanding ball in your sizing die to make them all round first. The cheaper the brass the more of a problem this is. This also insures the neck is the proper size for seating a bullet. I have never full length resized new brass, nor have I ever deburred any flash holes on any brass, or uniformed primer pockets on any brass. These are requirements for match shooting not for hunting loads. I shoot MOA and sub MOA groups with all of my high powered rifles and very good groups with my handguns (as long as I do my part) without ever doing those things. I think that is a lot of wasted time for hunting loads. If I were shooting in match competitions I would probably have to do those things to stay competitive. With all that said, if handloading is just one of your main hobbies and you just like taking those extra steps then that is great, but you will get fine accuracy without doing them. Enjoy your loading!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 454casull View Post
    You don't need to clean new brass and no there is no lube on them. Just rip the bag open and start loading. You need to run the necks over the expanding ball in your sizing die to make them all round first. The cheaper the brass the more of a problem this is. This also insures the neck is the proper size for seating a bullet. I have never full length resized new brass, nor have I ever deburred any flash holes on any brass, or uniformed primer pockets on any brass. These are requirements for match shooting not for hunting loads. I shoot MOA and sub MOA groups with all of my high powered rifles and very good groups with my handguns (as long as I do my part) without ever doing those things. I think that is a lot of wasted time for hunting loads. If I were shooting in match competitions I would probably have to do those things to stay competitive. With all that said, if handloading is just one of your main hobbies and you just like taking those extra steps then that is great, but you will get fine accuracy without doing them. Enjoy your loading!
    This is good input, but I don't mind the extra steps. They are just done one time and then it'll be a long time before needing more brass. No big deal. It's something I can do when I don't feel like working on the garage/shop/reloading bench. I've got 200 rounds of new starline brass for 500 S&W mag and 305 rounds of .30-06 once-fired stuff that I can diddle with. Really ...I don't mind. Maybe I'm anal or something ...but I always like to do the best I can do on things even if not required. A hang-up of mine I guess.

    Brian

  9. #9

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    Just another opinion, pistol brass aren't nearly as critical for case length and reaming the flash holes. That's what I was taught anyway, and it stands to reason due to the fact that you're not going to shoot at nearly as long of ranges with a pistol as with a rifle. Also, if you've got carbide dies for the .500 S&W, you don't need to lube the cases before you size them. The .30-06 on the other hand, definitely lube those before you size them.
    NRA Life Member, Prior F-16 crew chief.

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    Default

    Since I only reload a few rifle rounds each year, I don't use tumble to clean. What I do with new brass is to brush the inside area of each case with a soft nylon brush that is fat enough to completely fill the case. I also wipe the outside of the case to make sure it's clean.

    1. I do all this before I run a new case through the die:
    a. Inspect, brush, & clean the case
    b. Lube the case to below the neck, and the inside area of the neck

    I do this after:
    a. Wipe the lube off the case
    b. Measure and trim
    c. Chamfer

    This is how I clean the few cases: I made a loading block from two rectangular pieces of aluminum. It looks like a small bench, or the two pieces separated from each other about 4" with four 4" pieces of aluminum, one at each corner. I use this block to hold the brass upside down.

    1. I wash the brass in hot-soapy water, and brush the inside of the cases with a nylon brush.

    2. Thoroughly rinse the cases with hot water to remove all traces of soap, hang the cases upside down on the loading block, and place in the oven at WARM (150 degrees or less) for about 30 minutes, turn the oven off, and let them sit in there overnight until they cool. If the cases tarnish, I just rube a little "Never Dull" brass cleaner, and wipe them off with a clean rag. But I also use nickel-plated brass, and these give me less trouble, although i wash them in the same fashion.

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