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Thread: Camo patterns

  1. #1
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    Default Camo patterns

    How much more important to bow hunters is the type of camo you chose?
    Considering the much shorter range of a bow compared to a rifle.
    Is it all in just breaking up your outline and keeping still or does a particular pattern work better in a particular situation?
    Is the shade of the camo more important than colour?
    There is a bewildering amount of patterns available nowdays, but generations before us hunted successfully with far lower tech weapons and materials.

    Also found this on the web,it`s based in Germany and shipping charges would probably be prohibitive, but it passes an hour just browsing what they have.
    http://www.asmc.de/
    It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to open ones mouth and remove all doubt.

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    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Default IMO

    Sound is much more important than sight. If you're moving a lot, it doesn't matter what kind of camo you have on, you'll be seen. I like to wear surplus OD military wool pants, and wool or fleece uppers. If you're dead set on camoing up, the Columbia wooloflage is good colorwise. If you're doing tundra or sheep in the fall, look for the swiss alpine camo patterns. But remember- anything that makes a synthetic sound when you move is no good- go for the natural sound. Many camos are either too dark or too green- greys and browns for areas with cottonwood or in Kodiak. I have a mouse grey fleece for my top, and OD pants; for outline breakup I splotch some dark gray Ritz dye into them. Mostly, though, I watch my posture in the field- don't stop in the middle of a trail, don't skyline, and always have my profile broken up when I'm in a stand= don't leave yourself skylined from the sides to something looking up into your tree- keep or manufacture some branches around you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    ... I have a mouse grey fleece for my top, and OD pants; for outline breakup I splotch some dark gray Ritz dye into them...
    Does the Ritz dye "stick" to the polyester fleece? They say is won't work, natural fibers only. Maybe it will just fade over time or when you wash it. I have a very nice custom handmade windproof fleece pullover but it's dark green and black and I'd like to splotch/lighten it up with some grey.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default A couple of patterns

    I'm not a bowhunter, but I have used "Fall Sniper Brown" and "Advantage" up close with game and both seem to work well. Maybe that will help?

    -Mike
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    My GSP has the liver head with brown ticking on a grey body.When were out and about he blends perfectly in a variety of situations,just the blaze orange collar visible.
    It just got me thinking, all the patterns availabe to buy ...and grey and brown blobs work perfectly.
    Hmmm..wonder if I could shave him......
    It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to open ones mouth and remove all doubt.

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    Default What Chuck Adams said

    I like what Chuck Adams said, "if I'm relying on my camo then I'm doing something wrong." Chuck says, if all is done correctly the animal might get a glimpse of his head.

    I will say though, the closetest I've been to caribou on the North Slope tundra was when I had on a plain dark tan sweatshirt. I say this because, it don't get more wide open than the tundra.

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    Up close I wouldn't put my money on any camo pattern hiding you any better than a light/neutral solid color. It's more about movement and scent than camo and I have to agree with the comment from Chuck Adams.

    I do wear camo though, but it's for when I'm moving long distances and not on a stalk. If I'm half a mile away from an animal I want something that will break up my silhouette in case I accidentally get caught out in the open. Open patterns with large voids, like Predator or ASAT, seem to work best for this. Intricate patterns like Mossy Oak or Realtree seem to become big dark blobs at greater distances. I use Cabelas Outfitter camouflage because it comes in the synthetic fabrics I prefer to use, like fleece and Microtex.

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    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snyd View Post
    Does the Ritz dye "stick" to the polyester fleece? They say is won't work, natural fibers only. Maybe it will just fade over time or when you wash it. I have a very nice custom handmade windproof fleece pullover but it's dark green and black and I'd like to splotch/lighten it up with some grey.
    It seems to work pretty well. It fades, but thats what I want out of it. UK_AK- to add to my earlier post; I don't think actual camouflage is a must for successful hunting, or to sneak up on an animal. Its importance to the hunter is more on the lines of superstition; as a mental crutch, it can be crucial. If you think its making you a better hunter, than chances are, it is. Whatever you can do to keep your mind from doubting while you hunt is important. If you are convinced you cannot hunt well if you're not camo'd up in the right colors, or if you put your boots on before your hat, then by golly, get the right camo, and you better be sure you always put your hat on first!

    Whatever camo you choose, I stick by my statement about your environment. Camo is good, but just muted earth tones like light olive drab, gray, and tan are usually a good bet. Keep a quiet profile- be aware of your surroundings, try not to get outlined in openings or ridgetops. The worst camo I ever saw was a horizon camo. We were calling coyote in a snowcovered field, and when we left the truck I thought it rocked! It had a white background with gray limbs crisscrossed over it. My brother was wearing jungle fatigues- the old classic woodland camo, that was super dark and I thought would suck. I took the forward shooting position, and my buddy and brother stayed back against the brush calling. When I looked back I was shocked. In the fading light, the white suit practically glowed, and I could barely make out my brothers dark camo as he sat against the dense brushline. Needless to say, I didnt' kid him about his Uncle Sugar's choice in camo after that.

  9. #9

    Default Camo

    Shave the dog apply spirit gum and the dog hair. You'll be so camoflaged your wife won't even speak to you.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Best test

    I think the best test is to lay several patterns out on the rocks and bushes in the area you intend to hunt. Then take a gray scale picture of them. It will provide some good insight into how they look to the animals.

    Predator, Skyline, AST and my current parka, Cabela's Outfitter Gray in the Windshear seem to work pretty well up here. Open patterns that don't block up at distances are the best.

    Fooling the nose in number one, restricting any movements is two and having patience is number three in my book.

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    Just wondering if anyone has bought the gilly suit from cabelas and how well it works and an overall grade of the quality thanks

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    brav01... I can get away with doing less than shaving the dog to get her to not speak to me
    It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to open ones mouth and remove all doubt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    I think the best test is to lay several patterns out on the rocks and bushes in the area you intend to hunt. Then take a gray scale picture of them. It will provide some good insight into how they look to the animals.
    Check this out. Sporthill camo with a photoshop grayscale.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    all you need

    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Sneaked up and photographed lots of animals in Alaska,hunted with a rifle extensively in New Zealand and have found getting close to animals is a game of keeping downwind No.1,stay out of sight No.2,and keeping still if animal looks towards you if you are in the open.Movement gets the animals attention if you are camo'd to the max or not.

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    Wink

    Always like the larger patterns. The smaller patterns look like a brown blob from say one hundred yards.It"s easy for me to see a human shape,the preditor gray is nice, anything with a light background in the pattern. Methinks that most cammo/ makers want to fool you out of your cash!
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

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    Quote Originally Posted by LongHunter7 View Post
    ...Methinks that most cammo/ makers want to fool you out of your cash!
    Whaa... you mean.... but.... I thought.... no.....
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default Depends on what you are hiding from!!!


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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Say, someone left thier boots on the couch!
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwi308 View Post
    Sneaked up and photographed lots of animals in Alaska,hunted with a rifle extensively in New Zealand and have found getting close to animals is a game of keeping downwind No.1,stay out of sight No.2,and keeping still if animal looks towards you if you are in the open.Movement gets the animals attention if you are camo'd to the max or not.

    ^what he said^

    heck I lock eyes with ducks and they just come on in even with my giant white face hanging out in the middle of the marsh...
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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