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Thread: Just put 15K down on custom Stabi-Craft

  1. #1
    New member Sockeye Salm's Avatar
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    Default Just put 15K down on custom Stabi-Craft

    I've researched off shore boats for several years as I have gotten closer to my retirement, and I have decided on the Stabi-Craft!!! I have decided to retire within the next 6 months. By ordering my custom Stabi-Craft now I hopefully will have it by early spring. I've ordered the 759 - 25' 6" - weekender, powered by twin 150 Honda's.

    Any yeah's or neah's, hit me with them now!!!

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Default any pics?

    is it a cat or what? I know people love hondas. I get my balls busted alot over this. But all I can say with out seeing pictures is lose the HONDAS and get Yamahas or something. Other wise it sounds like you have a good plan and will have plenty of time to use it.

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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    They are a bomb proof design, for sure! That will keep the grand kids safe. I know they have a great ride and are very safe, but I cannot get over the lack of interior space. A 6'2" internal beam is not much. Will they do a forward leaning pilot house? Can you get more than the listed 60 some gallon fuel tank? Fuel capacity is huge! More is better.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sockeye Salm View Post
    By ordering my custom Stabi-Craft now I hopefully will have it by early spring.
    That is quite the turn around. I ordered a custom aluminum boat back in October of 05 and am just now finishing the build! You might think of drafting up a completion clause of some sort. I wish that I had. Just a thought.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    New member Sockeye Salm's Avatar
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    Excuse me, I thought people were more familiar with Stabi-Craft Boats. Here's the link.... check out the showroom then "759 Weekender"

    http://www.stabi-craft.com/

    It's basically an aluminum chambered boat such as the "ACB Boats" but in my opinion much better looking. The big deal about a boat like this is it is basically unsinkable, but in all fairness you do lose some cabin interior room do to the airtight aluminum chambers. But having been in emergency situation's several times in the past, and just plain lucky to have lived through them due to rough weather around the Kodiak area I'm going the ultra safety route for my Grandchildren sake.

    As far as my choice of power......to each his own. I've run Honda's in all kinds off equipment including my Rincon 4 wheeler, generators, and 50 horse outboard, none have ever had a problem of any kind. Until they do I see no reason to change my opinion of Honda products.



  5. #5
    New member Sockeye Salm's Avatar
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    [quote=spoiled one;188924]They are a bomb proof design, for sure! That will keep the grand kids safe. I know they have a great ride and are very safe, but I cannot get over the lack of interior space. A 6'2" internal beam is not much. Will they do a forward leaning pilot house? Can you get more than the listed 60 some gallon fuel tank? Fuel capacity is huge! More is better.

    The lack of space is something that I have thought about long and hard.......I've also been in life threatening heavy seas......you get one or the other.....we can all squeeze a little closer.....enough said.

    They do make a forward leaning house, it is probably the more popular design. It does increase the room in the house a bit, but I just plain think they are ugly compared to the sleek design of the aft looking house. The aft looking house just looks like it could shed any green water that you could possibly throw on it, and I have seen a lot of green water over the house in the past. (believe me, I am lucky to be alive!!!)

    Yes....this boat will come with a 100 gallon fuel tank. The web sight is out of date, particularly with boats that have been designed with Alaska in mind. They will also basically build a boat however you want it.


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    Member kaisersosei's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Very Nice...

    Stabicraft would be on my short list for sure if dollars were not an issue for me. I saw one at the show earlier this year and they were very nicely finished. The fuel capacity was the only thing that I was concerned with if you planned to go for any length of time on the water. Neil in Homer certainly swears by them.

    Again, congratulations on a fine boat!

  7. #7

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    What kind of heat are you planning? Do you have room for a webasto 3500?

  8. #8
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Default Nothing is unsinkable

    except for maybe the boston whalers. I know of one ACB boat that sunk off of kodiak some where either this past spring or the fall before. Insurance guy went through my dad's boss. We had thought about trying to buy as it was a very spendy boat and tried to get for next to nothing but the insurance guy said he couldn't sell it like they do sometimes. I never seen the boat. My dad was talking to the insurance guy where he works. The boat was anchored up when it sank. After that I never looked at one again. The acb boats look like a rough ride and pretty short sides.

    Never seen a stabi-craft. Seems like if they are that narrow they might roll from side to side in rough water or while anchored. But no experience with those boats.

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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Sockeye Salm;188930]
    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    They are a bomb proof design, for sure! That will keep the grand kids safe. I know they have a great ride and are very safe, but I cannot get over the lack of interior space. A 6'2" internal beam is not much. Will they do a forward leaning pilot house? Can you get more than the listed 60 some gallon fuel tank? Fuel capacity is huge! More is better.

    The lack of space is something that I have thought about long and hard.......I've also been in life threatening heavy seas......you get one or the other.....we can all squeeze a little closer.....enough said.

    They do make a forward leaning house, it is probably the more popular design. It does increase the room in the house a bit, but I just plain think they are ugly compared to the sleek design of the aft looking house. The aft looking house just looks like it could shed any green water that you could possibly throw on it, and I have seen a lot of green water over the house in the past. (believe me, I am lucky to be alive!!!)

    Yes....this boat will come with a 100 gallon fuel tank. The web sight is out of date, particularly with boats that have been designed with Alaska in mind. They will also basically build a boat however you want it.
    I actually like the looks of the foreward facing house better, but to each our own. I was thinking about some of the creature comforts that I have added to my "project" that will make the boat more conducive to family outings. They are:
    Insulation. It will make for a quieter ride, less condensation (especially in aluminum boats), and of course warmer.

    Cabin heat. I had a wallas 1300 in the old hewescraft. It worked well. I am putting an espar diesel furnace in the new one. More heat, thermastatic control, but more $$$.

    Wallas cook top and oven. Nothing like warm cinnamon rolls or cookies on a rainy PWS day, plus the cook top will work as a secondary heater.

    I am not sure how much room you will have in the V-birth, but you might consider a removable cot system. If nothing else, they will work as a catch all for gear. (I can post pictures if you would like to see what I mean)

    And for me, I have designed a deluxe 48" cleaning station at the aft of the fishing deck with knife, plier, hook and jig, and bait storage. All built to my specs, so I do not have to bend over. I am 6'6", so this will be a nice break for my back. I also had the galley built as tall as possible for my comfort and so that I can maximize storage.

    Are you going to be able to get pictures of the build process? I love seeing that kind of stuff.

    Any way that they can squeeze a bigger fuel tank or tanks? It is much easier and safer keeping fuel below deck than in jugs on the deck. You do not have to keep it full, but it is there if you need it.

    Congrats on the upcoming retirement present!
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  10. #10

    Default fuel tanks

    If you have the option to go with a 100 gallon, why not try to get an even bigger tank, 150 gallons or more. I have twin yamaha 150's and they use about 15 gallons cruiseing around 30 mph. 180 miles sounds like a lot until you spend a few days chasing black bears in pws. I've had saddle tanks installed and can carry 222 gallons. So far this has been enough for 3 to 4 days of cruising the sound. Nothing sucks more than having to run into Whittier to get more fuel while hunting. Other than maybe running out of fuel and having to call for a tow.

  11. #11
    New member Sockeye Salm's Avatar
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    Well I'll try to answer some of these questions and concerns the best I can, and what I don't have an answer for I will check with the dealer on.

    As far as heat goes, evidently you use the two burner Kerosene/diesel cooking stove which has a cover that goes on it to use as a heater. I was told that I should use kerosene rather than diesel to avoid fumes. If I need more I will bring along my Honda 2000 generator and come up with something, if need be I'll buy another Honda 2000 and tie them together. I use these in my Camper also so it would be a worthwhile investment to me anyway. Also I see an RV small portable propane Catalytic heater that is safe for enclosed spaces that I've been looking at.

    As far as being unsinkable, I said "basically unsinkable" and that said you would have to load the boat with lead or steal to overcome the flotation, or rip open the sealed 5/32" chambers in order to actually make the boat go down. You can pump water into the boat until it flows out the stern and the motors never get wet, just like a "Boston Whaler" but the flotation comes from three sealed aluminum chambers (two along each side and one in the bottom) instead of Styrofoam (like the "Whaler")

    The boat is no more narrow than any other aluminum boat of this size, it simply has a little less interior room due to the space along the outside that is taken up by the sealed aluminum chambers. this boat actually has considerably less roll and is more stable than others in this class due to the flotation from the 3 aluminum chambers. The external beam of this boat is 8' 6" and the internal beam is 6' 2". That's the price you pay for being "basically unsinkable". They build a bigger boat with a wider external beam, but anything over 8' 6" and you will need a permit every time you get on the road with it in tow.

    The boat is actually built in New Zealand so I won't have the opportunity to see and photograph the build progress. maybe I was misleading when I said it is custom built. It is actually a production boat but they don't build it until you order it, and you can work with them at that time to make what ever changes you like as long as it is doable in there eyes. These boats are used by New Zealand and Australian Coast Guards and are well known down there for there toughness and reliability. A perfect fit for Alaska users.

    I'm going to check in with the dealer (Ron's Honda Center in Soldotna) again concerning fuel capacity. It's already been increased from 67 gallons to 100 gallons for the Alaska model, but I totally agree with you guys that the more the better for the remote cruising that we do. Once I'm retired I might leave the dock and not come back for fuel for a couple of weeks if possible. I crunched the numbers with Terry at Ron's Honda and he figured I should burn about 10 gallons an hour with this set up at cruising speed of 30 MPH. That gives me a range of 300 miles. Does this sound feasible to you guys?

    Any other extra stuff I need or want on this boat will be installed by Me or my Son and powered by Honda generators if power is needed. I'm at my limit on my budget for this boat and we like to tinker anyway.

    I am going for broke on electronics, I've commercial fished for 20 years and I love high tech electronics. I'm still looking but at this point I'm looking at the new G Series Ray Marine System with the 15" screen.

    The price for all this is high but I suppose some of you will want to Know just how high so here goes:

    Boat and EZ-Loader Trailer delivered (Soldotna).......$80,000
    Twin 150 Honda's with counter turning screws....$22,500
    Props.....$940
    Bottom paint....$2,800
    Electronics......$10,000 (I'll probably go to $25,000 on this one)

    Add in complete Gage package,cables, horn, batteries (4), and installation of everything........
    Total......$123,330....more if I upgrade the electronics package.

    The more opinions the better on all of this.
    Thanks for listening!!! (reading)

  12. #12
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Sounds like you have done your research and you know what you want. That is half the fun. I think that a total burn of 10 gallons per hour is a bit on the low side for twin 150's (just my opinion). I know yamahas on similar sized boats are burning closer to 15 gal/hr at cruise. Perhaps the hull design on the stabicraft is much more efficient? I don't know. I would guess that the cook top is made by wallas. It has a blower that is activated once the lid is shut. It should heat that cabin up nicely. I have heard good things about Ron's honda. Service should not be an issue with them, unlike other service departments. I would definitely look into more fuel capacity. More capacity is always better.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    Member Gundog's Avatar
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    Default Fuel burn

    I think your fuel burn rate will be much higher than the estimate. I have looked at those boats and I like them. The only thing I don't like is the cabin size especially the birth I am 6-5 and my feet hung way out of the birth and it was very narrow I have the same issue with the ACB boats unless you go more than 8-6 on the beam.
    Mike

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    Default Here's what I've heard, but don't take it as gospel..

    Stabi-Craft and ACB's are great boats, they are the only thing comparable to a RIB in terms of safety and rough sea capability in a small craft. I talked to a man from ACB once though, said he used to sell and repair stabi-craft boats and stated that their thin aluminum hulls flex too much, hence the reason for the fiberglass pilot houses on the aluminum hulls. He stated that the major problems were cracks near welds and bulkheads. They may have corrected this problem, also since he was from seattle, I assume that he dealt with alot of people that liked to cross the columbia river bar, which can get particularly nasty. Other than that, I know nothing about them except they are nice looking, and probably nice riding boats.

    Chris

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