Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: WD-40 as a gun cleaner?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    302

    Default WD-40 as a gun cleaner?

    I have seen in a few threads around here people saying they use WD on their guns. I've always been one to pay the too much money for my cleaners and such. Is WD effective and are they using it as a cleaner? Nitromans thread got me thinking about this, just didn't want to hijack his thread about his concoction (sp?).
    Scott

  2. #2
    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Southwest Alaska
    Posts
    985

    Default

    I have used Water Displacement 40th attempt to clean my firearms for over 25 years. Just this winter I switched to Break Free CLP seems to work just as good if not better. May be a little more expensive than WD40, well out here it definitely is more expensive; $15.90 for a 12oz spray can, seems to lubricate the moving parts a lot better.
    WD40 is still widely used out here in rural Alaska to clean firearms, probably the #1 cleaner for most folks out here.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    85

    Default It's a winner

    For many years, I've used WD-40 to clean my rifles, shotguns, and handguns. Cheap and effective. And after a while, it smells good too!

    Some may tell you to spray some on your bait when you're out fishing. I've seen a guy do it and he sure didn't catch any less than the rest of us - maybe more. We were fishing for rockfish and halibut in PWS.

  4. #4
    Member Darreld Walton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Arco, Idaho
    Posts
    782

    Default Better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick...

    but there's better bore cleaners around. I use it quite a bit to clean old gunstocks. Doesn't damage the wood, and it does get an awful lot of the old black gunk and crud out of the grain. Especially useful to me for cleaning military rifle stocks with a soft rag and an old toothbrush.

  5. #5

    Default

    I don't rely on it any more for guns used around saltwater. It just doesn't last out the day, and you have rust by evening. I've had much better luck with Remington's Eezox for all day protection around the salt. WD is still useful at home, but I can't rely on it for muzzleloaders being put into storage either. Still get rust in the bore after a while. Eezox beats it there too.

  6. #6

    Default Wd-40

    WD-40 is a light oil that has good moisture displacement properties. With that said, it works well at removing moisture from guns that have gotten wet or have had condensation form on them. Just spray them down and wipe with a rag or paper towel. After that, I use CLP to re-lubricate and protect the weapon. CLP is quite a bit heavier than WD-40 and will not "run" as much as WD-40.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,461

    Default I used to, but...

    ...not as much anymore. My gun smith told me it leaves a residue...said it was probably ok on the bolt, but not on the trigger assembly. On his recommendation and other shooting friends I primarily use Breakfree, and I've recently been experimenting with Shooter's Choice spray (the polymer safe stuff).

  8. #8
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    684

    Default I agree, and

    there's one more factor for those shooting or hunting in temps at or below zero......WD-40 will freeze or at least keep the firing pin from moving freely. Given some of us may hunt in these really cold temps at some time, it's worth remembering. I recommend synthetics or graphite when temps dip a lot after you thoroughly clean a gun free of old lubricants.

    I also still use WD-40 for some applications mentioned earlier in this thread, and I also branch out to other lubricants for my guns.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    FAI
    Posts
    2,294

    Default nope on WD

    Even though it has oil, it was not designed as a lubricant, penetrant, or cleaner. There are much better options than that. On top of that it dries out.
    For cleaning, I'll use Carb cleaner or Brake Cleaner. No residue, dries fast, and washes off grease, dirt, and moisture.
    For lubricating I use Triflo. I have never had a problem with it, and it does not seem to dry out. My 11-87 worked flawlessly at -3 on a November duck hunt.
    I don't know much about bore cleaners or how they work, or if they work any better or different than the other cleaners I mentioned.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,809

    Default

    I don't use it no more. It seems to clog things up.

    I put some in my wife's Ruger Bearcat, and it gummed up the action so bad, it barely worked.

    If that happens to you, spray everything down inside with that gun cleaner stuff, or brake cleaner and re-oil things big time. You can blow out most of the oil, and keep wiping it off.

    IME, WD 40, not only leaves things gummy, it doesn't last very long either.

    I've used all kinds of oil on my guns, and they all claim to be good. I don't know which is the best, but I'm convinced that WD 40 isn't even close.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  11. #11
    Member alaskanmoosehunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Next to my trashy neighbor
    Posts
    362

    Thumbs up Wd-40

    Hasn't done me wrong....I have used it, what seems forever now.

    I have used it in -20 F and even brought it to Africa with me when it was 120 F. I can't say I have ever had a failure do to WD-40. My rifles and handguns have no rust. I like the smell and it's useful in the house, boat, camper and everywhere else.

    It works good in worms and other baits for fish too.
    Combat Vet by choice! Defender of this great nation and people (Which unfortunately also includes the stupid and the ignorant.)

    http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:_R_ZqAiK-e_U0M:<a href=http://hometeamsonline.com/photos/hockey/ARCTICLIONS/Ice_Puppies_Logo_Light_with_shading.jpg target=_blank rel=nofollow>http://hometeamsonline.com/photos/ho...th_shading.jpg</a>

    Support Youth Hockey!
    http://www.hometeamsonline.com/teams...Y&s=hockey&t=c

  12. #12
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Fairbanksan in Aleutian Hell
    Posts
    1,316

    Default

    I use it to flush crud during long range sessions or classes, but I make sure it's wiped off.
    Now what ?

  13. #13

    Default

    It also works good for cleaning the nasty road grime off of your vehicle.

  14. #14

    Default

    The MSDS sheet I have on WD40 says that its main ingredient is nothing more than a high grade kerosene. I have use kerosene to clean gun parts forever. I like Rem Oil as a lubricant!

    Some carb cleaners will get between the finish and metal on certain alloy receivers and actually blister the finish. I have a seen it happen to a Henry 22 lever gun and a Franchi 48AL scattergun.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,809

    Default Why WD 40 doesn't work

    This is not to quarrel with the many, who use WD 40, and believe it works on their guns.

    It is only my theory as to why it doesn't/didn't work for me. I used it quite a lot for everything. I still have it, and use it for cleaning things, but I have no faith in it's ability to lubricate.

    Here's something I found on the Internet.
    ""Near the end of last week’s tutorial, I mentioned that WD-40 should never be used as a chain lubricant. Quite a few people wanted to know what I meant by that. Here’s an explanation.
    WD-40 was developed in the 50s to prevent corrosion in electronic circuits. It quickly became a household item when people discovered it had thousands of other uses as a cleaner, rust-prevention agent, squeek-stopper and more. It also works wonders as a light lubricant on small items like hinges, locks, and toys.
    Bicycle chains, on the other hand, are far too heavy and fast-moving for the lubricating power of WD-40 to have any effect at all. As a matter of fact, WD-40 will actually strip away any existing lubricant and leave your drivetrain dry - metal on metal. Basically, spraying this stuff on your chain is worse than using no lubricant at all!
    Obviously, I strongly recommend using chain oil purchased from your local bike shop. Just go down there and ask them for regular waterproof chain oil. It shouldn’t be any more than 10 or 12 bucks, and it’s the best thing you can buy for your bike. My personal favorite is Cross Country, but if you want the Caviar, you can get quality oils from companies like Phil Wood. We’ll talk more about lubricants later…""

    Back to my theory. I think that it can remove existing lubricant from metal, and leave it unlubricated, plus leave any existing residue as a hard deposite, because it's more of a solvent than a lubricant.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southwest Alaska
    Posts
    2,145

    Default

    The lighter compounds in WD-40 eventually evaporate leaving the thicker, compounds which are what turns to a gummy residue. Left long enough these residues will become hard.

    My product does not do this.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

  17. #17
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    I don't even own a can of WD-40 and I can't recall ever attempting to use it on a firearm. As stated several times before me, WD-40 is not a lubricant at all and it leaves a mess wherever you use it. There are good products that work just fine for gun cleaning and lubrication and WD-40 ain't one of them.

    As for those mentioning carb cleaners, I have a word of caution. Do not use any carb cleaner on firearms as a matter of general maintenance. Do not use the red can brake cleaner either. These remove every last bit of oil from the metal and it is necessary to use great care in "re-lubing" of the entire firearm. They also permanently damage plastics and will ruin the finish on woods.

    When you have a really dirty gun that needs a blast of high-power liquid, use the CFC-free green can brake cleaner. This version will not damage the plastics and wood of the gun, so it can be helpful in blasting crud out from nooks and crannies that are hard to get into. Remember your safety glasses!
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  18. #18

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,809

    Default

    Nitroman:
    “My product does not do this.”
    I’m countin on it.
    Smitty of the North

    JOAT:
    O muh gosh, I dunno whut kinda Brake Cleaner I used. I musta used a lot, since it’s gone now. I did put the oil back though. I’ve been using Birchwood Gun Scrubber for a while now.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  20. #20
    Member walk-in's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    771

    Default better options

    I don't even own any WD-40. For a penetrating oil, Aero-Kroil is way better. For a gun oil that will really stand up to bad weather, I use LPS 3.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •