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Thread: SIP homes

  1. #1
    Member akprideinvegas's Avatar
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    Default SIP homes

    Hello, do many people use SIP panels for their smaller 20x20 homes. i have not found too much information about this but i know birch creek builders referance and use this design. What would be the good and bad sides of SIP vs a normal framing style place. Vance

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    One of the advantages is ease and speed of construction. Disadvantage is that it has to be prefabricated then transported to the site.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

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    Cool SIPs

    Vegas-

    I am building a SIP home this summer. About 30x32 2 story with a detatched garage. I am finding more advantages with this style of building than disadvantages.
    I'm not a carpenter, but know a little bit about building (see picture of my cabin in this section of ODD). With my knowledge, the occasional guidance of a contractor I know, and some labor help we should be able to finish the shell in 2 weekends. The initial cost of the material is a little bit more than stick-frame, but since I can do a lot of the work myself and construction time is significantly reduced, I will save thousands in labor.
    Structurally they are superior to stick-frame. There are no studs, per se, to find when hanging rock or hanging cabinets or pictures for that matter. There are no bowed walls due to inconsistent dimensional lumber. As long as the foundation is level, everything will be square.
    As far as transporting to your job site, it's either 100lb SIP panels or individual pieces of lumber. I think I would rather deal with 32 one hundred pound panels than all the framing lumber. You'll proabably have a fork handy either way.
    The one disadvantage I have found is, if you construct your SIP home properly, the house becomes so air-tight that you need a air-exchange system for proper ventilation. Probably a small price to pay for long term efficiency
    Personally, I think they are the way to go.

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    SkinnyRiver I was refering to transporting SIP's to a remote site. Yes they cost more anyes they are faster to put up. In my opinnion it is 6 one way and a half dozen the other. Which do you have more: of money for labor or money for materials? Either way the money gets spent.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Member akprideinvegas's Avatar
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    Well since transporting these will not be a problem what other things should i know about these. Also once you have the sip panels assembled how are the inner walls built? like to make rooms and what not??? thanks vance

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    Default Ahh...money....

    If we only had more...

    Garnede: What you said is a true statement. I suppose it might be a wash if I was a proficient framer. I think you will agree, insulating and sheetrocking sucks. SIPs eliminate insulating and rocking is a breeze. I'm saving about 50% compared to a stick-framed house so to me it's not 6 or 1/2 dozen!
    Just my opinion...one that I've been researching for about 4 years...
    S

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    Member akprideinvegas's Avatar
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    skinnyriver. pm sent

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    As a designer I actualy like SIP's but as a former carpenter I love framing. If you are doing it yourself absolutely sips makes it faster and therefore cheeper. The same is not true, usually, when using contractors. If they are used to framing then they will charge extra for having to use a system that they do not know. I didn't want to discourage you from using SIP's. Thermaly they are usually far superrior to stick built, especialy if you use foam insulation. The comment about needing an air exchanger because buildings are tight is also true. Just wanted to show that they are not the best for every situation.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Member akprideinvegas's Avatar
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    thanks, i want to know everything about the sip's. the good and the bad. this is an exciting process and look forward to everybit of it.

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    Member Michael's Avatar
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    What do you use for an air exchange system?

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    Hi,
    As far as good and bad sides of SIP home is concern the only comparison I hear about when comparing the cost of a SIP house Vs Sick is:
    After it is all said and done the SIP is about the same cost
    I think in both of the case the the labor reduction is the key factor.In the Chesapeake area of Virginia there is so many builders who provide such type of SIP homes like http://www.culpepperlanding.com/

    thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by akprideinvegas View Post
    Hello, do many people use SIP panels for their smaller 20x20 homes. i have not found too much information about this but i know birch creek builders referance and use this design. What would be the good and bad sides of SIP vs a normal framing style place. Vance

  12. #12

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    I have used sips 2 times now. The first time was on a cabin and we only used them for the roof system. The interior was finished with beaded pine. When finished the clear span ceiling was finished and we figured that we saved 5K over all by going with that system. The second time I used them we also had all our dormers built at the same time out of SIPS. Again it penciled out in time and money.

    Both of these projects were log cabins and only used above the logs. I do not know how it would pencil out from floor up. In both of my cases there was extra or complicated work that was saved due to SIP's. The finish work we saved by not having to install the beaded pine on the first ceiling was huge. No scaffolding, we did not need the third man for handing stuff up, no man lift need outside under the eves and so on.... On the Dormers we put those up the same time that we put the roof on and all the walls were ready for windows and mud as the rock was already on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by klickitat View Post
    I have used sips 2 times now. The first time was on a cabin and we only used them for the roof system. The interior was finished with beaded pine. When finished the clear span ceiling was finished and we figured that we saved 5K over all by going with that system.
    Were those cabin built up here in AK? If so, who supplied the SIPs with an interior finish already on them?

  14. #14

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    No they were built down here in Washington State. The panels are Eagle panels. http://www.eaglepanelsystems.com/index.html

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    None of the log builders I have worked with have found SIPs to be an econimical choice for their projects once shipping is figured in. Ditto for smaller (less than 600 sqft) cabin builders.
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