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Thread: Newbie

  1. #1
    Member bourbot's Avatar
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    Question Newbie

    Hi,
    Got a few questions. I recently bought a Bear "Instinct". I have never shot a bow before. I'm not sure what my draw length is, the draw weight is set at 55# I had a guy at the bow shop set me up and I have been going out every day for a couple of hours to shoot. My questions are;
    1 Is this bow a good setup for deer and elk? I just moved to WA after 30 years in Alaska.
    2 Should I set the poundage up higher?
    3 I have a 3 pin sight, what yardage should I set that for? I have heard 10, 20, 30. And 20,30,40, and 30,40,50. Just wondering what you all think?
    4 When I practice I use 6"paper plates. Should I be shooting at something smaller?
    Thanks in advance for any and all advice.
    Calvin

    We need a revolution to get this country back from the crooks. Abolish the IRS, Income Taxes, Federal Reserve, and "All" government handouts.

  2. #2

    Default

    Boy I remember those days. Mine was a forked lightening jennings I bought from my cousin for 50 bucks shew....


    Anyways, I'll do my best to answer you questions.

    1 sure, tuning is everything, get it tuned and it'll shoot just fine\

    2 Accuracy is the most important game here. To heavy leads to problems. Cranking bow weight up or down with affect your tunning which will effect accuracy and arrow flight.

    3 base your pins on your max effective range. If your max range is 30 yards then go 10 20 30. Dont get to wrapped up in how far the next guy shoots. Bowhunting is a close range sport, stay with that mindset and you'll never be dissappointed!

    4 Practice makes perfect, so perfect your practice.

    This is kinda three fold.

    First, you need to TUNE the bow to get perfect arrow flight. This can be a slow tedious process or a really fast one depending on what you have for help. Realize everyone is different so what works for me with your bow, might not work for you, there are really no equals acrossed the board, just generalities that sometimes work...you'll have to tweak this, hopefully with a good mentor.

    Second you need to site in the bow. The small the target, the more focused you have to be to hit it. Idea is, aim small miss small. Aim big, miss big.

    Lastly, Once you're sited in, then it's time to perfect your practice by perfecting your form. People end up with target panic by getting to envolved in accuracy and not involved in form. For a compounder with a release and a properly tuned bow, you can get away with a bunch of form flaws. For a stickbow shooter, form is everything. Not saying the better you can be consistency wise wont help you, it will! By spending time not worrying about where it's going instead of how you are getting it there, the accuracy will improve by leaps and bounds. Basically, it'll do exactly what you want it too. This is where most bowhunters fail, and many fail miserably! You dont have to be a competitive paper shooter to have this kind of mindset. Both games are played by one thing, accuracy!!! Put the arrow where it needs to be, you'll win tournys and you'll kill game!


    The 2 bigs of bowhunting. knowing WHEN to shoot and being able to be ACCURATE enough to kill/hit (paper) it. The WHEN will only come with time, the more you've hunted the easier this will come......

  3. #3
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    Default

    if you are in KENAI CHECK with Len ( pres of Kenai Peninsula Archery club ) i think he is doing classes
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
    MASTER BOWHUNTER EDUCATION INSTRUCTOR; MEMBER UNITED BLOOD TRACKERS; POPE & YOUNG MEASURER

  4. #4
    Forum Sponsor PM Asman's Avatar
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    Default

    Can't say much more; see Len to get the bow tuned, dialed in and arrows matched - then practice. Enjoy it!

  5. #5
    Member OKElkHunter's Avatar
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    Default Just fine

    The Bear Instinct is just fine for deer, bear, elk, moose or anything else you may want to hunt in North America; and 55lbs of draw weight is enough for any north american game as well, as long as your arrow weight and spine are correct for the draw weight. Any archery shop should be able to match your arrow spine and weight with your bow, if the shop don't have a chart, find another shop and don't go back to that one. TradBow is absolutely correct, have a competent shop tune your bow and practice, practice, practice. There are numerous web-sites that can help you out and any archery shop with a range will have someone that can give you pointers on shooting form. http://www.archeryisfun.com/
    http://domino.htcomp.net/ragsdale.nsf
    http://bowhunting.net/equip.htm
    http://www.bowhunting.net/ybc/startpoint.htm#top
    My advice is to find a good shop that sponsors shooting competitions and you'll find all the expertise you need to become a proficient shooter.
    Welcome to the sport of hunting with a pointy stick.

    Quote Originally Posted by bourbot View Post
    Hi,
    Got a few questions. I recently bought a Bear "Instinct". I have never shot a bow before. I'm not sure what my draw length is, the draw weight is set at 55# I had a guy at the bow shop set me up and I have been going out every day for a couple of hours to shoot. My questions are;
    1 Is this bow a good setup for deer and elk? I just moved to WA after 30 years in Alaska.
    2 Should I set the poundage up higher?
    3 I have a 3 pin sight, what yardage should I set that for? I have heard 10, 20, 30. And 20,30,40, and 30,40,50. Just wondering what you all think?
    4 When I practice I use 6"paper plates. Should I be shooting at something smaller?
    Thanks in advance for any and all advice.

  6. #6
    Member
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    Default form matters

    TB said a lot of good things, but regardless of what you shoot, form is everything. If you never shot before, find somebody that coaches and hire them to give you basic instruction. Build good habits first, it is easier than going back to break bad habits that were avoidable in the first place.
    Only shoot poundage that you can pull back first thing in the morning while sitting on a bar stool or workbench, feet in the air, and keep the bow level. Way too many guys are overbowed and have to pull skyward, which leads to form and safety issues.
    Don't be concerned about adjusting/chasing your equipment to shoot Xs. Learn good form, let the groups start to get smaller, and when the groups are consistent, then adjust your pins and sites to hit X.
    And have fun. Shooting should be relaxing and enjoyable. Don't worry about what went wrong, focus on what you are doing right.

  7. #7
    Member bourbot's Avatar
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    Default New Bow

    Thanks gents, I appreciate all you had to say. When I first bought the bow, I bought a half hour of the ole boy that works there's time to get me on the paper and show me the basics. He sold me a dozen carbon arrows, a bow, and adjusted my bow weight to 55lbs. I think that is a good weight for me. Anyway, he too, told me that form is everything, He said he shoots 2 hours everyday and there were pert near't a hundred trophy's in that shop, so I supposed he knew what he was talking about. I went out and moved the pins on my bow to 20,30, and 40, and was hitting the 6" plates. I will take your advice and work on my form.
    Calvin

    We need a revolution to get this country back from the crooks. Abolish the IRS, Income Taxes, Federal Reserve, and "All" government handouts.

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