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Thread: Dogs Disagreeing

  1. #1
    Member Bear Necessities's Avatar
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    Default Dogs Disagreeing

    I need some help. I have a Pudlepointer (versatile pointing dog, looks like a Griffin) and a Beagle. They are both unaltered male that I keep in the house. The pointer is a couple of years younger and was submissive. However as he gets older there have been a few fights. The beagle was sick for a couple of weeks about a month back and now the two do not get along. Iím looking into getting them both fixed (after the holidays), will this help to reduce or eliminate the aggression? They are both good with adults and kids. I do not see this aggression with other dogs when Iím out training and think that they are just setting their order in the pack, but this needs to stop before someone or one the dogs gets hurt. Any advice would be appreciated.

  2. #2

    Default

    Don't let them set the order of the pack !!!
    Don't let them settle it amongst themselves either.
    You are the pack leader and no acceptions to it.
    You've got to know how to read the dogs. You've got to pick up on how dogs communicate with each other. Vocally and body language.
    I have been running a free range kennel for many years. I've had as many as 52 dogs at one time in the same yard. It's like an episode of Cesar Melan. When a dog acts out unappropriately I correct that dog along the same ways that Cesar does.
    You learn over time how to detect a problem and correct it before it occurs. Some dogs will stare with intented focus at the other dog. Head and neck straight and stiff with the tail up in the air is another sign.
    Start working on there obedience drills. Obedience isn't just when you are out in the field training. Do simple obedience in your home as well. These drills will allow you to establish yourself as the leader. Once you have given a command "Reinforce it". If you don't, with established aggressive dogs your command will mean nothing. If it were a group of dogs I was working here. I would put them in the same situation that triggered the fight. If it was over a toy or food, sometimes just over space. I would put it in front of both of them and dare them to look at it or each other.

    Contact me if you need more info. I'd be glad to help on a more formal basis. This isn't an overnight fix. But once you have been taught how to be a more dominant pack leader you will have the knowledge necessary to prevent problems in the future.

  3. #3
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    Default agree

    WL says it right once again. Let me paraphrase. You are the leader, so lead. You set the standards, not them. You determine everything that they do, including pecking order.
    If my dogs ever got into a fight with each other, it ended up with me winning. Period. I don't care who lost, but I won. There are no fights allowed unless I pick it, and I always win.
    I know that sounds harsh. But doing so once or twice usually corrects behavior issues with the dogs. If you aren't sure, then call WL, or somebody else and get the word first hand.

  4. #4
    Member Bear Necessities's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks, I may be on the right track. The last fight I thought that I was getting a little harsh. I ended up pinning them both to the ground on their backs. I thought that I was the leader but I guess this need reinforced. It appears that the fights begin because they both want next to me (my attention). Thanks to for the help, I will keep working on it. And thanks for the offer, I my have to get a hold of you after the holidays.

  5. #5

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    Hey, alright I'm applauding you. Just like a true pack leader would do to a subordinate that acted out.
    Dogs don't respond to human psychology. It makes them more neurotic.
    You have to treat dog problems with the theory of how a "pack" operates.
    To your dogs your family is a pack.
    REMEMBER keep your hands out of a dog fight. Put your hands in your pockets and use your feet. Once you have them seperated then pin them. Hopefully you can correct them before they fight.

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    Default body language

    Good move on the alpha roll. If things get physical, that is a good place to end up. But do go back to what WL said about "read the dogs". The goal is to catch the fight before it happens. Look for the clues and act on them. Those are the root cause and if acted on is what will keep a fight from happening.
    If in doubt about a dogs intent, assume the worst in this case. Go ahead and make them go through obedience. Make them mind and pay attention to you. Ensure that you have redirected their focus on each other towards yourself.
    Good luck.

  7. #7

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    Does this work for dog/cat rough housing? When we brought our choc. lab/beagle home it was cute when him and the cat would play. Now that Jack is getting bigger the playing is getting rougher.DSCN3292.jpg

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    Default never rolled a cat

    Not sure how alpha rolling a cat would work. Better wear welding gloves. When they rough house, is it play or does one or the other get mad? Generally I see if it gets rough the cats put the dog in place or runs off where the dogs can't reach them. Is what they are doing a problem or an inconvenience for the family?
    If it continues in a manner that you don't like, then scold them verbally while backing it up with something physical. That tangible reaction from you should be consistent always. In time, just he verbal reprimand should suffice to get the kids to stop causing a commotion.

  9. #9

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    Not that's too funny.......
    I can picture it now........
    I wouldn't worry about it. Your cat will draw a line eventually. They are pretty good about that and very serious about it when they want to be.

    Now if your cat is enjoying it too much and is actually eggin on your pup. You might want to stop your pup before they start rearranging your house. Start rules and boundaries.
    I'm laughing with you. That has got to be a hoot to watch.

  10. #10
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Default dog vs cat

    We've got a couple cats also. Our lap dog will play with one of them (the less aggressive cat) but not the other. She will bark and dart in close, paw at the cat, and then dance back out of claw range. The cat just sits there annoyed for the first couple passes, then it will give chase and eventually pounce the dog and slap it silly. The cat never extends its claws and the whole operation is obviously playful, so I don't intervene. Now the "meaner" cat has long since put the lap dog in her place and the 2 of them simply avoid each other by mutual agreement.

    Now, when the Golden Retriever chases one of the cats, I'll stop that right away. He's big and when he chases the cats, they don't react in a playful manner, but go into self-preservation mode, so I don't let him play with the cats at all. At this point in his training, he no longer messes with the cats at all. When he was still puppy size, he did take a few claws during the learning process. Fortunately we keep all the animal's nails trimmed, so they don't tend to draw blood.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  11. #11

    Default

    Yea, I'ts a regular uncaged UFC match. Throat holds, leg grabs, double legged kicks to the head ( by the cat, who still has all his claws). my biggest fear is the dog (Jack) is going to lose an eye.
    Thanks for the pointers. Now when they start up, they're both instigators, we put the cat on his climbing tree or over the puppy gate. the cat can run anytime but he eggs on the dog.

  12. #12
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    Default -50

    Get some video of them playing and post it. It might be worth the 10 grand in prize money. Watching a cat and dog play like that is funny. Unless they cause you undue concern, let them roughhouse. It is better than watching tv.
    More than likely they will outgrow the play time. Then all the fun will be gone. Just like a couple of kids, you will know the minute things get serious and then be able to take steps to quell the violence.

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