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Thread: X-country ski binding ?

  1. #1
    Member Joel Zadvorney's Avatar
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    Default X-country ski binding ?

    How do I attach a boot to the ski. A hiking boot binding? I want to ski in to a spot then hike from there. I'm trying to figure out what to search for but have no idea what it is called. Any help.

    Thanks, Joel

  2. #2

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    www.akers-ski.com

    have a look at the berwin backcountry bindings. Have heard good things about the karhu winter trecking skis with their universal bindings.

  3. #3
    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    Default silvretta

    I just figured out how to do that exact thing. Silvretta bindings work on any boot with the crampon receptacles. 404's are the old cheaper standby been around for years and the 500's are new carbon lightweight, not so proven models. That is exactly all I know. (I know jack crap about skis, but this setup works great.) Google search "silvretta"
    Saw some on ebay from time to time.
    Good luck.

  4. #4

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    Some more info on your needs would help. Are you using hiking boots because you need to scramble on some rocks, or because you want to avoid buying specialized skiing boots, or ???

    Your location suggests that the Silvretta bindings and their ilk are overkill for the skiing portion. These are really ski mountaineering bindings, more suitable for Western and Alaskan mountains than Eastern (unless you're seeking the steepest routes in the East for turns.) If you're talking about doing an approach in the Adirondacks or Catskills followed by some snowshoeing, a heavy-duty three-pin binding like the Rottefella Super Telemark without heel cables or with cables would be a better choice, IMO. Three-pin boots work well in most snowshoe bindings, and there are boots that are plenty warm for all but standing around in subzero temps. However, they typically have relatively thin sole lugs and don't offer the traction that climbing/hiking boots provide.

    The Karhu trekking skis, aka the Meta, aka the Karver, aka some other name when sold by LL Bean, are much slower than true skis and don't turn nearly as well. The energy to push them far exceeds the energy I use to carry lightweight snowshoes on my pack while I'm skiing on true skis.

    Take a look at Dave's Nordic Backcountry Skiing Page for some excellent advice on gear.

    If you do actually need to climb/hike after skiing, then the Silvrettas are one option. Others to look at will be found by searching for "randonee" or "Alpine touring" or "AT" bindings. The single best forum for users' comments on these is probably Telemark Talk Forum. (But realize that many, not all, of those users are devoted to skiing downhill on the steeps and don't emphasize efficiency in striding forward.)

  5. #5
    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    Default ??

    what's an adirondak or catskill?

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by AK-HUNT View Post
    what's an adirondak or catskill?
    New York state mountain ranges. The OP is in Buffalo, New York, according to his profile here.

  7. #7
    Member walk-in's Avatar
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    Default suggestions?

    I'm thinking about doing the same thing. I haven't done any skiing in several years, and when I did, it was on old military skis. I'm not sure where to start for either skis or bindings. I put out a short and close to home trap line this winter, and I've been thinking about running it on skis. I'd like to have some versatile skis that would work for running the trap line but could also see occasional moderate downhill use. Since I used to ski downhill and cross country in bunny boots with cable bindings on military skis, I imagine anything remotely modern would seem great by comparison. I'd really like to be able to wear my Baffin boots on skis if I could, but I'm too ignorant to know if that is even possible. Any help would be appreciated.

  8. #8
    Member RainGull's Avatar
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    Default

    Akers

    Something like this...(mentioned higher up the thread) Look under telemark, you probably won't find much listed under cross country anywhere.
    Science has a rich history of proving itself wrong.

  9. #9
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    Default AT gear

    You would be looking for All-terrain or mountaineering gear. I have a set of Silvretta 404 mounted on a fat heli DH ski, cut down in length (short), with ful skins. They allow a stride n' glide, depending on snow and slope. Good grip for slogging up hill, and more manuverable than snowshoes on the steeps.
    The binding fits DH boots but works great with my plastic shell Scarpas.
    These are a great alternative to snow shoes, far more 'lively'.

  10. #10
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default

    One caveat with this approach is that hiking boots don't have nearly enough support to be used as a ski boot, and you'll really notice going down hill. And if you have boots stiff enough to ski in, you'll be miserable hiking in them.

    I'd thought that a neat way to get back from hikes in the hills would be a pair of the mini skis that have crampon style bindings. Hike back into the hills, and ski out. The two problems with that approach are the boots don't have enough support even with the short skis, and the short skis don't have enough flotation for anything other than packed snow.

    A long way of saying there is much compromise by not going to the trouble of using ski boots when skiing and packing your hiking boots. And if you're not in technical terrain, a lightweight pair of waxless skis and boots plus your hiking boots will be the same weight if not lighter then a pair or rondene style skis and bindings with the single pair of mountaineering boots.

    I did get a set of 404's and am looking for the appropriate ski to mount them to and skin up, as that is more what I'm after, but I'll also need a more appropriate boot than my current mountaineering boots.

  11. #11

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    Gotta go with Paul's experience on this. If you try for a compromise, it's likely to fail.

    Too-soft boots will really strain the tendons from the shin to the foot if you try to push anything more than a thin ski.
    Thin skis suck for breaking trail. They have to be really long to offer any flotation. Long skis are hard to turn.

    You have to take an afternoon to master a telemark turn to turn any freeheel binding, and an afternoon in the woods will show the limitations of thin skis.
    My guess is, even though you live in flat Buffalo, you'll see why all those tele and randonne guys love their fat skis and stiff boots - they rarely have to take them off in a day in the mountains.


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