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Thread: Good knives...

  1. #41

    Default Knives are cool but.....

    I have several handmade knives.

    I have one that was custom made out of a car spring for my father when he was young.

    I also have a big whaling knife that I found outside of my cabin in Ambler.

    For my use I have several old Sog Bowies(made in Seki Japan not China like now)

    I tell you what is most addictive though.

    Japanese Samurai swords. Nihonto.

    I have 13 different blades that range from Gendai and Gunto production during WWII to three Kamakura(1200AD) era tachi.

    I don't use them for cutting brush and I have spent quite a bit polishing them (don't ask) (togishi) and refitting them.

    They are a lot like old colts. They have a "smell" of history to them.

    I think that Alaskan's can appreciate this feeling.
    Once you get started collecting these, you are screwed.
    They require constant care and you become caretaker rather than owner.

    I can tell you that they appreciate far faster than the market.

    Sincerely,

    Thomas

  2. #42

    Default

    I should be getting my 2 Ingrams today or tomorrow, it's been a loooooooonnnnnnngggggggg wait!

  3. #43
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Sportsmans has select fine knives on sale right now for 50% off...
    some nice ones....

  4. #44
    Member sgteldridge's Avatar
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    Default

    Which Ingrams did you get

  5. #45
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    Now my number from Gene total's 4, 1 from Charlie May, and 1 from Lee Perkins. Lee is impressive. From what I seen on photos his knives are top tare, less than $200 and finished within 4-6 weeks. Charlie May takes 12-14 months and Gene takes 30 months.
    I'll post a photo of the Perkins once it arrrives. My research revealed that newly made Randall knifes are not near as good as quality as they used to be. And with a 4 year waiting list and double the price I passed on them.
    Peyton, Colorado

  6. #46
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    Amongst twenty or so knives that I own are three very special knives. Knife number one is by Jerry Fisk and is a Sendero model with carbon steel and bighorn sheep scale handles. The second one is by Greg Neely and is a ladder pattern damascus he forged while teaching at the Old Washington Forge in Arkansas and carries a stag handle. Last but certainly not least is my everyday carry knife while hunting. A Wegner model folding Spyderco with ATS-34 I paid about $100 for in 2000. The Wegner is probably the bargain knife of the century.

    What makes the Fisk and Neely knives special besides just knowing these two gentlemen is that we had the two of them plus Harvey Dean sitting around a fire in South Texas a few years ago while bowhunting for hogs and javelina. Three of the better master blade smiths that ever forged a knife talking shop around a fire is quite an evening.

  7. #47
    Member dwhunter's Avatar
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    Default Knives

    I am with Brav01 on this topic, over the past few years I have really been educated on the differences of many of the various knives, makers, steels etc.

    I do not buy cheap knives anymore, as with a rifle, scope etc I look at them as a tool that must perform when I need it and as with the above cheaper is not always better.

    I now have

    Strider smf folder
    Strider SNG folder
    Rj Martin Trooper folder- brand new and not used, bought low as investment.
    Entire line of Kershaw ZT knives including prototypes
    Keith Coleman Folder
    5-Kershaw Echos

    Countless older Bucks, cases, schrades etc from my youth that are just safe queens now.

    The Striders, RJ Martin, Keith Coleman and we will see about the ZT's will hold their value as they are made with the best of steels, and other materials and just like my rifles they will be great to pass on to my children.

    Doug

  8. #48
    Member JamesMac's Avatar
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    Finally got my Randall it took 4 years! This is one nice knife! It has exceptional ergonomics and the heft is just right. It is a model3 hunter 5.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #49
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Aren't you afraid you'll get that shiny thing dirty?


    ps. good looking toad sticker.
    Last edited by kingfisherktn; 10-28-2008 at 12:25. Reason: added info

  10. #50
    Member JamesMac's Avatar
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    Oh ya! I plan on getting it good an dirty

  11. #51
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    I was expecting that response.

  12. #52
    Member JamesMac's Avatar
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    I must be getting predictable

  13. #53
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    I would have been worried if you hadn't made that response--any good hunter would respond like that.

  14. #54

    Default knife recommendations

    You may want to give Scrapyard or Swamp Rat knives. I own both and they are VERY tough, take and hold a good edge. Though they are not stainless. Also have a Bark River knife and tool Lil Chute knife in stainless 12C27 a great edgeholding and strong steel
    Good luck

  15. #55

    Default Randall

    Quote Originally Posted by JamesMac View Post
    Finally got my Randall it took 4 years! This is one nice knife! It has exceptional ergonomics and the heft is just right. It is a model3 hunter 5.
    Looks like a good candidate for a SAFE QUEEN to me;LOL !!
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  16. #56
    Member JamesMac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brav01 View Post
    Looks like a good candidate for a SAFE QUEEN to me;LOL !!
    Not a chance brother!

  17. #57
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    I have a few knives, not as fancy as some mentioned here but very nice. After skinning and quartering a few moose through the years, I have realized that it's a good idea for a knife to be used for such a task to have a non-slip grip. This prevents your hand from sliding on a grip that is bloody.

    Some of the knives I have:

    -Buck Omni Hunter fixed blade. Not bad at $45.00, and pretty sharp, although the edge has to be touched with a steel a time or two through a "moose job."

    -Cutco Hunter (straight edge): Around $70.00, and somewhat similar to the Buck above. Maybe the edge lasts a tad longer?

    -Vitorinox Butcher (4" and 6" blade, skinner): Around $16.00. The cheapest and sharpest, with the strongest edge knife I have ever used. Only good for skinning and butchering, and razor sharp. Very difficult to sharpen because of the thin blade. But once you find the right angle and take you time at it, you can shave with it.

    -Alaska 2-Knive-set (Light Hunter Combo): Paid around $125.00 years ago, and now see it at Cabela's for $189.00 Work well, but the handles are too small, and the grip is not the best around. The blade of the skinner is very thick, and although it can be sharp, the edge is a little on the soft side. Cute knives, though. I used them one time on a moose, and now like to look at them every now and then.

    I also have a couple of Gerber knives, one of which my wife gave to me as a present long ago. It's similar to the Longbow drop point, with a soft handle that has finger grooves (grip). Beautiful knife, and sharp, but have never used it. The Gerber Freeman S30V, fixed blade is worth a close look. I plan to buy one of these in the near future. It has a very nice Cocobolo handle, and costs around $99.00.

  18. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by RainGull View Post
    I have a Lofgreen custom skinner that my uncle Bobby made (no longer makes them so this isn't a sales pitch) as well as a neat little boot knife unmarked and made by one or another of my uncles (several talented knife makers in the family). Not sure of the steel but it was real hard to change the edge profile on the skinner and it holds up really well.

    He had an 18 month backlog on an $800 knife in the 70's, but 4 years! You are patient.

    I ought to take some pictures of them. I have a couple of saved magazine profiles on his work including American Blade in '78. He was admitted to the American Knifemaker's Guild in the 70's and introduced to the guild by Robert Loveless the President saying, "Now this next applicant isn't just trying to become a knifemaker, he already is a knifemaker." Here is a magazine scan of a bowie that American Blade profiled that I always fancied, or rather coveted:

    I just picked up the Buck Vanguard Alaskan Guide series knife in S30V with a Titanium Aluminum Nitride coating and brass/laminated Rosewood handle from Cabela's for $95 and then ordered another one (a great bargain in my opinion, locally it is $100 in 420HC without the TAN coating).

    I need to pick up something for my daughter and two boys now.


    My dad bought about 7 or 8 knives from your uncle in the 70's when we lived in Lakeside, AZ. I currently have 2 of them. Beautiful knives!!!

  19. #59
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    Default Take a look at IRBI knives

    I bought my first IRBI in 2000, made by Virgil Campbell. Since then I have bought over a dozen more for family and self. 6 are a set of custom steak knives. My favorite is my Damascus drop point. It was one of Virgils 1st Damascus. I can skin and piece out two deer without needing to resharpen. That includes cutting through joints. I have a lot of other brands of knives but for the field I'm an IRBI fan. http://www.irbiknives.com/
    Life of the maker full warranty. They are in Moose pass, on the road to Seward.

    Stryder

  20. #60

    Default This is the knife path I've taken

    Not that you guys need to follow the same path as I but I'm pretty happy with this company:

    http://www.diamondbladeknives.com/index.aspx

    This is a new and improved version of Charles Allen's Knives of Alaska, using D-2 steel and Friction Forge Technology. The cutting edge gets to Rockwell 65-68 while the spine of the knife stays realtively soft at a Rockwell 42.

    I've paired the small Pinnacle II (a small bird/trout parring knife) with the PD1, a 6 inch general purpose drop point blade. These knives are the toughest things to sharpen due to that super hard edge, but man once sharpened hold that edge better than anything I've ever used. I did not like the handle of the PD1 so retrofitted a Sambar Stag Crown to the handle. A leather over Kydex sheath houses both knives into one compact package.

    Admittedly a new path to take but this new technology seams to have hit the mark, at least for me.
    Yea though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for the shadow is mine and so is the valley. Thy Glock and thy M14 comfort me in days of civil unrest and terror

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