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Thread: Trawlers Net 139,112 Kings

  1. #1
    Member anonymous1's Avatar
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    Thumbs down Trawlers Net 139,112 Kings

    Read Wes Loy`s Highliner Blog in todays ADN. This years observered king by-catch harvest was 50,000 more Kings than last year in the Berring Sea.

    http://community.adn.com/adn/node/114623

    Gulf Of Alaska numbers are also staggering
    and increasing These are Cook Inlet, Copper River, Kodiak and west coast fish

    1990-2001 king by catch
    http://www.adfg.state.ak.us/pubs/afr...1/withv9n1.pdf
    I could`nt find the recent numbers. Maybe you can.

    I know you guys are pretty busy fightin over your favorite fishin holes and probably did`nt have time to pay attention last week when the by-catch issues were on the table at the NPFMC meeting. It will be a long time before it is addressed there again.
    The BOF can and should do something about this and there are 2 proposals for the Kodiak meeting that need surport to stop this wanton waste of salmon. The State needs to demand 100% obsever coverage on these guy and do genetic sampling of every salmon that comes aboard.
    I searched the forum archives on this and found nothing. These guys can be brought to task.

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    Default

    I'd expect to see a decrease in that catch this year due to lower pollock quotas. Do you have any clues as to the average size and maturity of the kings caught? Sounds like a problem, especially if the salmon were about the same size as pollock because you couldn't use size selection methods to reduce the catch, however remember salmon of that size still have a very large natural maturaty rate so it wouldn't be 50,000 fish directly from our fisheries, but some percentage of that (the younger the average fish caught the lower the &#37 Got any links to what f&g has to say about that?
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Default some chinook bycatch information

    I think the Gulf chinook bycatch was a little over 40,000 fish this year.

    I haven't seen much on the estimated stock composition of the Gulf salmon bycatch, but there is some information on Bering Sea chinook bycatch. Roughly 60% of it is western Alaska fish (Bristol Bay, Kuskokwim, Yukon...) and the rest from other places (including Asia, other Alaska, and BC/Pacifc Northwest stocks...in no particular order). Regarding the age of the fish, they're immature, and most are 1 to 2 years away from returning to their rivers of origin. The North Pacific Council staff put together a good summary of the science a few years ago:
    http://www.adfg.state.ak.us/pubs/afr...1/withv9n1.pdf

    I think there might have been a more recent analysis at last week's Council meeting, but I couldn't find it online. However, the Council website has a webpage with all of the information that their salmon bycatch workgroup has dealt with so far:
    http://www.fakr.noaa.gov/npfmc/curre...ch/bycatch.htm

  4. #4
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    Default information void

    yes current information is hard to find and the trawlers want to keep it that way.
    Being a commercial guy my self I can say this about most of us.
    When the target species decline we fish harder and strain more water to fill our holds. If your target species is pollock who occupy the same water columne as salmon you will likely catch more salmon not less in a declining pollock population fishery

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    Default Well,

    I thought I could add some here. First the data is hard to find as most is confidential. You want 100% observer coverage on pollock boats (which already basically exists.....80-120 foot is 30% coverage, but most all coverage is taken during pollock seasons, and any catcher boat over 120 is 100% and all C/Ps in the bering sea that fish pollock must have at least 200% observer coverage (2 observers 24/7 observe all hauls). Anyway if you really do want more data than we can not abuse the confidentialilty of the fleet. Remember at the moment the fleet pays to have observers not the gov. Also in the past data has been misused as soon as it was released. So in a way we need to fleet to know that data collected to manage fisheries will be used for that and only that. Without that they could possibly kill the observer program. (though I seriously doubt it.)
    Also the cap was a soft cap, and this issue isn't going away. The council will be dealing with it over this year and next. The fleet in general is trying to deal with it which is why they tried the voluntary rolling hotspots last year.

    Also NMFS had mandated a new sampling sytem to deal with in haul variance, and other problems. As for genetic material observer will be collecting gentetic samples from as many salmon as possible (maybe as many as 240/observer with maybe 20,000 total.)

    So this is an issue that is important enough that people are trying to deal with it. The pollock fleets are trying. They are attempting to make excluder items, but it's hard as the kings are fairly small, and swim with or very close to the pollock. I agree with your worry....to many kings are taken.........but to say that nothing is being done is false. To say this is going away is not true.

    Anyway if you want more info that I may be able to give let me know or pm me. I will say that if you want specifics I may not be able to reply due to the above mentioned confidentiality. I can't talk about anything but general things. Hope this helped.

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    Default

    Also in the bering the overall pollock biomass isn't really declining......there are just a couple year classes out there. An old one with big fish and 2 new ones with very small fish. The ones in between were fairly small which is normal in natural populations. The sky is not falling on the pollock fishery....it is simply a recruitment issue. In two years there will be as much pollock as normally caught.

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    Default more info

    I am not saying this below fixes anthing, but people are working on it.




    CONTACT:
    Sheela McLean
    (907) 586-7032

    NMFS 08-AKR
    January 17, 2008

    Salmon Bycatch EIS Under Way
    The North Pacific Fisheries Management Council and the Alaska Region of NOAA Fisheries are getting ready to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on measures to reduce the incidental catch of salmon by trawl vessels fishing for pollock in the Bering Sea.
    Chinook and chum salmon bycatch in the pollock fisheries has increased significantly in recent years. Reducing and controlling salmon bycatch is one of the most important issues being discussed by the Council this year.
    In 2007, NOAA Fisheries implemented management measures that give the pollock industry more flexibility to move their fishing operations to avoid areas of high salmon bycatch. As a follow-up to this action, the Council initiated this EIS analysis of alternatives to further address salmon bycatch. These alternatives include implementing new salmon area closures or establishing bycatch limits that would close the pollock fisheries once the limit is reached.
    "The Council is looking at the current regulations and limits on salmon bycatch for the pollock fisheries,” said Doug Mecum, Deputy Administrator for NOAA Fisheries Alaska Region. “The Council will be evaluating the possible effects of new regulatory closures and salmon bycatch limits."
    "This is the scoping period for the upcoming EIS. We’re asking now for written comments from the public on the issues, including potential impacts and alternatives that should be considered in revising salmon bycatch management," said Mecum.
    The public comment period for scoping on the EIS ends February 15.
    Instructions for submitting comments and more detail can be found at www.fakr.noaa.gov/sustainablefisheries/bycatch/default.htm
    Any regulation changes will be designed to maintain a healthy marine ecosystem, ensure the long-term conservation and abundance of salmon, and to provide maximum benefit to fishermen and communities that depend on these resources.
    Analysts will evaluate potential effects on salmon stocks and other components of the marine environment. Social and economic impacts also will be considered, including the effects that salmon bycatch management measures would have on pollock fishermen and on people who rely on commercial, subsistence, and recreational salmon fisheries.
    For further information, contact Gretchen Harrington at 907-586-7228 or gretchen.harrington@noaa.gov
    NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries Service) is dedicated to protecting and preserving our nation’s living marine resources through scientific research, management, enforcement, and the conservation of marine mammals and other protected marine species and their habitat. To learn more about NOAA Fisheries in Alaska, please visit our websites at: www.alaskafisheries.noaa.gov or at: www.afsc.noaa.gov
    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, an agency of the U.S. Commerce Department, is dedicated to enhancing economic security and national safety through the prediction and research of weather and climate-related events and information service delivery for transportation, and by providing environmental stewardship of our nation's coastal and marine resources. Through the emerging Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), NOAA is working with its federal partners, more than 70 countries and the European Commission to develop a global monitoring network that is as integrated as the planet it observes, predicts and protects.


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  8. #8
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    Default more data from council newsletter.

    BSAI Salmon Bycatch
    The Council moved to refine their current suite of alternatives
    for the forthcoming salmon bycatch reduction measures EIS.
    The main aspects to the Council motion included specific years
    for defining the cap formulations for Chinook and non-Chinook
    salmon species, an option to divide any resulting cap by
    sectors, and to further subdivide such a cap within sectors by
    cooperatives.
    In considering the ranges of numbers to include for caps by
    species, the Council moved to consider a range of Chinook
    caps from 21,000–114,000 and a range for non-Chinook of
    55,000–925,000. These ranges are considered for analysis of
    the likely impacts on the pollock fishery and salmon stocks of
    any proposed cap. Multiple caps levels are considered within
    this range by species. For Chinook salmon, the alternatives
    also include an option to split the resulting caps by season.
    The Council motion indicated that two methodologies will be
    considered for dividing up the sector-specific salmon cap:
    1. Division of the cap based upon AFA percentages (i.e.
    50% shore based CV fleet; 10% for the mothership
    fleet; and 40% for the offshore CP fleet)
    2. Division of the cap based upon historical average of
    percent bycatch by sector
    The option to further subdivide sector allocation by cooperative
    shall be based upon the percent of total sector pollock catch
    their coop allocation represents. The motion further indicated
    that when the Chinook salmon coop cap is reached, the coop
    must stop fishing for pollock and may lease their remaining
    pollock to another coop (inter-cooperative transfer) within their
    sector for that year, or purchase salmon bycatch from other
    cooperatives.
    Further refinement of alternatives will occur at the February
    Council meeting. At that time, the Council will review
    candidate closure areas for incorporation into the alternatives.
    The Council will also receive information from staff on
    monitoring and enforcement considerations with the current
    suite of alternatives and additional information as necessary to
    assist the Council in further refining alternatives at that
    meeting. The analysis will be analyzed within an
    Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), and as such, NMFS
    drafted a Notice of Intent (NOI) for Council review at the
    December meeting. The Council reviewed and approved the
    NOI. Once the NOI is published the scoping period for the EIS
    will begin and will continue through the February Council
    meeting. Information on submitting written comments on the
    range of alternatives and issues to be analyzed in the EIS is
    contained in the NOI. Refinement of alternatives is scheduled
    for the February Council meeting. A preliminary analysis is
    scheduled for the April meeting and an initial review draft of
    the full EIS is scheduled for June 2008. The full Council
    motion as well as additional information on salmon bycatch can
    be found on the Council website. Staff contact is Diana Stram.

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