Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: wood burning stove

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4

    Default wood burning stove

    is there a discount or, used site or something i was told wood burning stove cost alot

  2. #2
    Member Michael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Anchorage / Glennallen
    Posts
    162

    Default

    You can get a stove kit for a 50 gal drum for under $100. Works pretty darn good.

  3. #3

    Default

    Go to craigslist and do a search on wood stoves...like this
    http://anchorage.craigslist.org/sear...<br /> Ask=max

    A barrel stove is hard to beat for a cabin.
    Wasilla Real Estate News
    www.valleymarket.com

  4. #4

    Default wood stoves

    We have 4 of then now and have tried a few more at 1 time or another. If you can find an original Earth Stove they are the Cadillac's of wood stoves. Blaze Kings are close 2nd but some of the finest stoves in Alaska have been built here and with the addition of [made for stove doors and dampers} have an edge on them all.
    Barrel stoves sure do keep you humping for wood but you can put 1 together for next to nothing.
    The stove-pipe and chimney top along with regular sweeping are almost more important than the design of the stove itself.
    I tend to use more than enough gun

  5. #5

    Default

    I heard that one of the prisons sells wood stoves made by the inmates for the cost of material.

    Anyone else heard this?

    Ken

  6. #6
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    4,403

    Default Directions

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael View Post
    You can get a stove kit for a 50 gal drum for under $100. Works pretty darn good.
    If I remember correctly, a layer of sand has to be placed in the bottom so the logs are not directly on the metal. Fire brick and sand would be better. It is made to different thicknesses for different applications.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  7. #7
    Member M Gho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    70

    Default enough stove

    You will want to make sure the stove is big enough for the cabin size. I have been in a few cabins (big ones) that take forever to heat up because the fire box is too small for the size of the cabin.

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    493

    Default

    I have a Jotul wood stove in my house. Its very effecient and heats the house nicely. It was kinda pricey I thought,but i want quality in a wood stove.Overall Im very happy with it.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    My advice to new wood stove shoppers is this. There are two kinds of wood stoves. Those that put out a lot of heat quickly and those that maintain a low flame for a long time. Not many stoves out there are good at both. If you intend to arrive at a very cold cabin the quick heat type is attractive. When the cabin gets warm and it's bed time you'll fill the stove, sweat for the next two hours as it roars, and then freeze two hours after that because it burned out. On the other hand, the high-efficiency stoves will take longer to heat the cabin but once it's warm will maintain more even heat and will last all night on a load of wood. I started with the former and now have the latter. If your arrival temp is low the best thing to do is start the wood stove and then turn the propane oven on full and open the oven door. That trick works wonders. Electric blankets on the beds are nice for pre-heating the bed. I think the constant heat from a good air-tight stove is worth the slow initial heat-up.

  10. #10
    Forum Sponsor BHMStaff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Gold Beach, Oregon
    Posts
    13

    Default Make your own

    If you're handy, building a stove from a barrel, as Michael suggested, might be a good, inexpensive solution.

    Here is a link to an article about building a barrel stove that ran last issue:

    http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/lee108.html

    and one that's a somewhat larger project:

    http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/lee90.html

    Hope that helps.


    Oliver

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Leavenworth Wa.
    Posts
    234

    Default Wood stoves..

    Here in the cascade range, we don't have the minus temps you folks have, but low teens can be the norm for weeks at a time.The barrel stove will take good size logs, and burn lots of wood.Using a 32 gallon one in my wall tent, it has to be tended often.I have a quadrafire wood stove in the cabin, and one in my shop.I maybe use two and a half cords all winter.It is our only heat while we are home, but do have elect for when we leave for longer periods.We have no fire protection except extinguishers, as we sled in all winter, so a clean chimney is a must.Takes 20 minutes every 2 months.Cheap insurance.George

  12. #12

    Default

    Haven't tried this, but plan to.

    completely surround the wood stove and chimney with heavy fencing. Leave the door free so you can feed the stove. Then fill the fencing with rocks all the way up.

    This will create a heat sink that will soak up the heat from the wood stove running at full tilt. Then it will release the heat into the room slowly over time.

    That is the theory anyway. I'm going to try it in my next cabin.
    Wasilla Real Estate News
    www.valleymarket.com

  13. #13
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    4,403

    Default Marv

    Sounds like a takeoff of the old Russian oven. Basically a small firebox in a large brick mass. The flue zigzags back and forth in the bricks before exiting. The theory is that the small fire heats the large mass of brick and distributes it evenly for a long time. Only small fires are necessary.

    http://heatkit.com/docs/oven-russian.pdf
    Last edited by Daveinthebush; 12-22-2007 at 22:36.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  14. #14

    Default

    That's a pretty cool fireplace Dave, but I think the cost of building that would be about equal to the total cost of my cabin. I gotta stay simple. I think the rocks around the standard stove will probably not be as efficient as that type of fireplace, but it will be easier and cheaper to make.

    I'll let you know next year.
    Wasilla Real Estate News
    www.valleymarket.com

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •