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Thread: Methods of Calling

  1. #1

    Default Methods of Calling

    Just interested in what methods are working for guys? Are most of you using mouthcalls or electronics? I've had luck both ways, but the electronics are a bit nicer when it's really cold in my opinion. Anybody willing to share what sounds on the e-callers have been most productive? FoxPro's Snowshoe and Lightning Jack sounds have worked pretty good as well as the Wildlife Tech. Cottontail. The old Johnny Stewart Bird distress sounds have worked decent too.

  2. #2
    Member Timber Smith's Avatar
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    Heh snowcamoman what species are you targeting? Calling tends to be specie specific. Be glad to depart my limited knowledge. Seriously, I do a bit of varmint and predator hunting use mouth calls and a Fox Pro III.

  3. #3

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    When I go out, I try to target any type of predator. Typically, I call Lynx, Fox and Coyotes the same way. I don't try to "focus" on one particular animal when I go out calling. Whatever comes in to the call will do. I usually call the same way, other than use louder volumes if I'm on Lynx and longer/continuous sounds for Lynx. For Fox and Yotes, I call for a couple minutes then wait, call and wait so and and so fourth for about 20 minutes. Then I pack it up and move on.

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    Member Timber Smith's Avatar
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    OK, I guess I don't cast a big net. With predators I usually go after one or the tother, and tailor my tools to the task and environment at hand. Although occasionally a target of opportunity arises; usually I don't find the various species in the same area. (Especially true of the dogs). I have found lynx and fox in the same wooded habitat and both will respond to the squealing of a snowshoe hare. With cats it helps to have an attractor as they are curious. I don't find fox particularly difficult many times a mouse squeeker is all it takes to seal the deal. Coyote I don't find with fox. The coyote are in more broken and open terrain, where an E caller really shines especially to other coyote calls. Usually I take my golden as my assistant, he is well trained and works close he acts as a decoy, attractant and serves well to anchor the Yutes once they come to the E call. In fact some times I give him a squeaky tennis ball to play with once I get the Yutes working, this really gets their attention. Shots tend to be at longer ranges. I've been known to score a few doubles on coyote. Wolves are hard. Realistic wolf howls work well. For wolves I won't take my dog. Although I think it would work, I like him too much. I have taken my share of wolves but, it has been usually over a kill site or off snowmachine and the shots have all been at a distance. Wolverine are few and far between and really just targets of opportunity. I've only seen a couple in all my years of tramping around the Great Land and managed to shoot just one and he was on a gutpile. Bottomline is that predators are where you find them. Obviously, you need to move around and hunt different areas, if anyone else has hunted in your areas the local population of predators quickly become educated. If you are able to locate an AO that you have confidence in sit tight. I believe that is one of the common mistakes novices make is moving around too much and especially too soon. Trust your stand and give it time. Patience and Peserverence. Timber out.


    “Go as far as you can see; when you get there you'll be able to see farther.”
    Thomas Carlyle

  5. #5

    Default

    saw a video on that, using dogs as "decoys", kinda cat and mouse game....was pretty sweet, never saw this before.

    I was thinking of snatching up a russel or someones pugg and staking him out for wolves..ok ok, just kidding lol. But I had thought of the dog sounds on a recorder for those wolves also. Heck it aint a half bad idear,taping, not staking out a real live someones pet decoy LOL!

    Also bawling cat sounds for..well...cats. That and wounded birds work well! As it does on dogs.

  6. #6
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Moose

    Why not try a moose calf call. Natural food and natural sound to them.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  7. #7

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    I use an FX3 and most often play the snow shoe hare. I'll play it for a minute or two, stop, scan, and repeat. I'll do that until I get bored. I've had great success locating coyotes with the coyote locator. If I am unsure about an area, or I don't know the area very well, I'll throw out a few locator howls. If I get a return howl I'll work my magic (what very little I have) in that direction. The coyote I called in last winter that my buddy shot came in on a snow shoe rabbit in distress. He was young, dumb, and full of.... well you know. In the past three years I've seen more and more of them. If I want to switch things up I'll use the woodpecker distress, or female coyote invitation in Jan & Feb. On a downed coyote I will immediately let out some ki-yi's. You never know what will come trotting in for a look.

    Predator hunting is some of the most fun I have had during the winter months. It's very exciting to hear a coyote howl when you're calling or see fresh tracks where a pred circled you for a sniff. It's odd though, I've called in more coyotes standing around bs/ing, or figiting, or making noise than compared to controlling scent and sitting perfectly still.

    I want to do some calling tomorrow morning but the wife won't let me unless someone goes with me.

  8. #8

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    I've found Coyotes in the areas where Fox are here in the interior, but not often enough to make me use many Yote vocals. Lynx seem to be around Fox areas as well, and the decoy is definately a helper with a cat. Those cats just lock up when the sound stops and need that little extra eye appeal to help clinch the deal it seems. The FoxPro snowshoe sounds have worked pretty good and are top notch recordings. I have some canine sounds on mine, but haven't been out for wolves yet, especially that NorthPole / Chena gang that's snacking on the chained up variety. Sounds like there's a gang out there trying to get them though. Went out this morning after last nights snow, but got skunked. Saw a bit of fresh sign, but nothing came in. At least the full moon's coming around next weekend, should be good for night hunting.
    So here's a question for the Coyote guys out there. Has anybody been successful on the Yotes in Delta? I've had those things bark howl and do everything else, but never come in. One time they were moving in and then some photographer shows up and jumps out to take pictures of me, and the other time a wolf howl shut them down. Any pointers on those well educated dogs is appreciated.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I know that when my brother traps lynx that he hangs a ptarmagin wing above the set as a visual attractant. Would the same thing work when calling as a decoy? Perhaps hang the wing 20 yards away as a way to keep their eyes off me? Just thinking out loud here.

  10. #10

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    Brian, that is typically all we do for visual aids. If you dont expect a cat, dont waste your time!

  11. #11
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TradBow View Post
    Brian, that is typically all we do for visual aids. If you dont expect a cat, dont waste your time!
    Thanks for the info. There are definitely cats in the area that I'm hoping to call (I found a skeleton of one a few weeks ago), and it only takes a few moments to hang the wing.

  12. #12

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    yup you're right. it's a quick easy setup and can work well.


    For dogs usually we are set up in areas we know they are there, and usually they are more open areas. Though a cat really could show up anywhere as we're usually hunting near hares or grassy field kinda stuffs. Then again with a 22-250, is there really a need for hanging a wing? For bowhunting there definatly is an advantage. With a 6-18x40m xII, and the right rifle/bullet combo, you can be quite deadly.

    now if I could only find the right rifle to mount it on ........................ UGG!

  13. #13

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    Tradbow,
    I agree with you 100% on the dogs being in more open areas. Seems like Fox and Yote will just come flying in on open areas. I've never seen a Lynx cross a big opening unless there was a bit of cover for them to sneak up behind. I watched 2 Lynx last year from a hillside sneak in on a fairly open field. They used every bit of cover and grass swales around to conceal themselves. It was a blast to watch them, too bad the season was closed. I've also seen Lynx come up to a field (no cover) and stick it's head out for a second. Then they popped back into the woods and slowly worked their way towards the screaming FoxPro.

  14. #14
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    Default

    I heard a rumor awhile ago that a guy used to use a blank cd when he was trapping lynx. I was told that the reflection off the snow makes the cd shine when it turns and the cats are really interested in it. Like I said just a rumor but maybe something to try...

  15. #15

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    I've seen CD's hanging in the woods on fishing swivels. Looked like they were set up by Marten poles, but I've heard of people using them for Lynx too. I imagine a cat would come to check out something shiney swinging in the tree like a CD. And here I thought people were giving out free CD's in the woods....

  16. #16
    Member MNViking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowtechshooter View Post
    I heard a rumor awhile ago that a guy used to use a blank cd when he was trapping lynx. I was told that the reflection off the snow makes the cd shine when it turns and the cats are really interested in it. Like I said just a rumor but maybe something to try...
    Should put all those copies of Brittany Spears new album to good use.

  17. #17
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Wow if I would have known they had a use I wouldnt have added my dixie chicks cd to the other 100,000 along the side of a texas hwy.

  18. #18
    Member Skookumchuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TradBow View Post

    I was thinking of snatching up a russel or someones pugg and staking him out for wolves..ok ok, just kidding lol.
    I've heard that works well here in Juneau.......

  19. #19
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Attractors

    CD's, bird wings, flagging tape, ballons on a short string, pieces of fur, cloth wet with scent, lots of things work.

    There are at least 3 companies that make battery operated attractors too. Combined with a call they are deadly.

    But it is a lot like deer hunting. Watch your wind because if a predator can circle to check the scent, he will.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
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  20. #20

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    I have heard of people facing an ecaller up wind while they are facing downwind. The theory behind the story is if a predator is going to circle downwind this will possibly give you a good opportunity to see the predator for a split second while they are trying to sniff a whiff. It hasn't worked for me though.

    The area I hunt the wind, when it's moving, is always in the same direction. I try to have the wind in my face and the sun at my back, but it doesn't always work that way. I've called in a few coyotes with a crosswind just ripping through the valley, and I have called them in with the sun in my face. The more I predator hunt the more I give up on strategy and hope luck is on my side. I try to find the most productive areas and work them to the best of my ability. But still I am 0 or a coupla hundred trips, but I hunt them edjamucated yotes too.

    This thread has my blood going. I am trying to plan an overnight trip next weekend to the ole yote grounds. I know of a coosy cabin and where the yotes are located, but my wife insists I invite a trust worthy freind, or I cannot go. Wive's Gotta luv um.

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