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Thread: New Book: Hunting the Hunters

  1. #21
    Member The German's Avatar
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    Well,,,,,, I don't see it that way, he is going to have to "Live" with his/those actions, the rest of his Life, just like the "Old-Sayin",,,, Newton's Law
    For every Action, there is a Re-Action, of "Equal" or in most cases, of "Greater" Magnitude,,,,,, ie...
    Once a Convicted Felon, always a Convicted Felon;
    There is "No" Re-Start Button in Real Life,,,,, you have to live with the "Consequences" of your Actions.
    And just my "Opinion", he should have "Lost" all, Hunting, Fishing, Trapping, Guiding Privileges, etc... for "Life" not just 3yrs.
    TG
    [ USMC 1st Marine Div. 7th Engineers, VietNam 69-71, Semper-Fi ]

  2. #22
    Member cod's Avatar
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    Got the book a week or so ago. Read it in one sitting, about 5 hours i would guess. Good read. I picked up a few good tips but agree w others. There are plenty of areas he could have helped us out with advice but did not do so. It does stimulate one's predatory instincts to get out after them again. C'monnnn SNOW!
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!
    WWG1WGA! QANON

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by cod View Post
    There are plenty of areas he could have helped us out with advice but did not do so.
    I for one am glad that he didn't point out specific locations. If he had, you can guarantee that every body and their brother would be running directly to those locations and hunting them out. I think if you read between the lines you can kind of figure it out yourself. I think he mentioned in his book that he will often drive a 1000 miles or more over a weekend and he will frequently drive 50-100 miles or more in between making sets or stands. To me that pretty much tells me he drives EVERYWHERE you can drive to in Alaska, and he looks for sign, and when he does find sign, he stops and hunts it.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post
    ...I think if you read between the lines you can kind of figure it out yourself. I think he mentioned in his book that he will often drive a 1000 miles or more over a weekend and he will frequently drive 50-100 miles or more in between making sets or stands.
    I agree Jack, in fact as a fellow of the forest myself, I still find Rick's info a big help in my thought process when preparing for a predator hunt.

    For someone not familiar with our vast bitterly cold areas his information could be critical to helping one survive the conditions encountered; when its really cold, when your machine breaks down, the kind of clothes that really work and why etc. This is some of the best material I've read on actual gear needed to survive extreme cold endeavors.

    I like the story where he runs & guns 3-days covering 3,000 miles by truck and takes 39 fox off the road system. No breaks, Mtn. Dew and no-doze helped but also "hunting" like few ever do. Most don't know they can.

    I'm not up to 3-days with no sleep anymore but I enjoy Rick's book nonetheless and it will be a keeper even after I'm less keen about cold-cold weather.

    However...check out that moon Jack! Should be warming a bit too... I'm not sure where you'll find me a night or two this week... :-)
    That country was so hungry even the ravens were packin' a lunch.... HUNGRY I tell ya'!!

  5. #25
    Member cod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post
    I for one am glad that he didn't point out specific locations. If he had, you can guarantee that every body and their brother would be running directly to those locations and hunting them out. I think if you read between the lines you can kind of figure it out yourself. I think he mentioned in his book that he will often drive a 1000 miles or more over a weekend and he will frequently drive 50-100 miles or more in between making sets or stands. To me that pretty much tells me he drives EVERYWHERE you can drive to in Alaska, and he looks for sign, and when he does find sign, he stops and hunts it.
    Negatory Jack. I've been misinterpretated. "There are plenty of 'areas' he could have helped us out." Meaning AREAS of 'information'. Such as what others had stated.... calling in wooded surroundings, what call sequences, etc.
    As far as jumping on a snogo in the middle of nowhere, finding fresh tracks, and pursuing... not my cup of tea. That's not how I hunt em. But I'm sure he knows things I don't about wolves and such that he could have passed on to us.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!
    WWG1WGA! QANON

  6. #26
    Member nooksack's Avatar
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    I stumbled on to a transcript of the precursor to this book more that ten years ago. I believe it was called The Fur Hunters. It was written by both Rick and Braun Kopsack and was an excellent read. Apparently this book is what is left after a falling out between the two.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskan Woodsman View Post
    I agree Jack, in fact as a fellow of the forest myself, I still find Rick's info a big help in my thought process when preparing for a predator hunt.

    For someone not familiar with our vast bitterly cold areas his information could be critical to helping one survive the conditions encountered; when its really cold, when your machine breaks down, the kind of clothes that really work and why etc. This is some of the best material I've read on actual gear needed to survive extreme cold endeavors.

    I like the story where he runs & guns 3-days covering 3,000 miles by truck and takes 39 fox off the road system. No breaks, Mtn. Dew and no-doze helped but also "hunting" like few ever do. Most don't know they can.

    I'm not up to 3-days with no sleep anymore but I enjoy Rick's book nonetheless and it will be a keeper even after I'm less keen about cold-cold weather.

    However...check out that moon Jack! Should be warming a bit too... I'm not sure where you'll find me a night or two this week... :-)
    My thoughts exactly Woodsman.

    Quote Originally Posted by cod View Post
    Negatory Jack. I've been misinterpretated. "There are plenty of 'areas' he could have helped us out." Meaning AREAS of 'information'. Such as what others had stated.... calling in wooded surroundings, what call sequences, etc.
    As far as jumping on a snogo in the middle of nowhere, finding fresh tracks, and pursuing... not my cup of tea. That's not how I hunt em. But I'm sure he knows things I don't about wolves and such that he could have passed on to us.
    My apologies. Never meant to imply a negative interpretation of what you meant. I was merely trying to give my opinion about the matter.

  8. #28

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    I have a couple copies of this book and still find that there are some golden gems of wisdom in it. I ended up getting the 6PPC caliber after reading this book and duped exactly what the author had for ballistics. He's correct about it being super accurate and fur friendly.

    The thing I always asked myself about this book and had in the back of my head is "Where do you ride a snowmachine the way he did and hunt?" The only place that even remotely sounds like an area you could hunt like that is up the Haul Road past Atigun. If that's the case, then we'd better keep dreaming, because there's no legal way to take a snowmachine off the highway to hunt north of the Yukon bridge. Maybe there are some areas I'm missing, but usually, it seems like you're up against the mountains pretty quickly on a snowmachine or in the flats with brushy areas where running a machine is near impossible.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by snowcamoman View Post
    I have a couple copies of this book and still find that there are some golden gems of wisdom in it. I ended up getting the 6PPC caliber after reading this book and duped exactly what the author had for ballistics. He's correct about it being super accurate and fur friendly.

    The thing I always asked myself about this book and had in the back of my head is "Where do you ride a snowmachine the way he did and hunt?" The only place that even remotely sounds like an area you could hunt like that is up the Haul Road past Atigun. If that's the case, then we'd better keep dreaming, because there's no legal way to take a snowmachine off the highway to hunt north of the Yukon bridge. Maybe there are some areas I'm missing, but usually, it seems like you're up against the mountains pretty quickly on a snowmachine or in the flats with brushy areas where running a machine is near impossible.
    What about the area around Galbraith Lake and Toolik Lake? I've spotted wolves around those locations and it seems like those would be good locations to ride a snowmachine. Plus you could use the pipeline access roads as places to park and ride from.

    Also, maybe the Denali highway, Steese, and Elliot Highways?

  10. #30

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    Anywhere north of the Yukon is off limits to motorized vehicles, including snowmachines. It's an Alaskan Statute AS 19.40.210. Prohibition of Off-Road Vehicles.

    (3) the use of a snow machine to travel across the highway corridor from land outside the corridor to access land outside the other side of the corridor; this paragraph does not permit the use of a snow machine for any purpose within the corridor if the use begins or ends within the corridor or within the right-of-way of the highway or if the use is for travel within the corridor that is parallel to the right-of-way of the highway; in this paragraph, "highway corridor" means land within five miles of the right-of-way of the highway.


    The Denali Highway would be possible in areas I guess, you just have to start at Paxson or Cantwell and ride the road. The Steese and Elliot would be tough to run and gun like Kinmon did, unless they were able to ride ridges. The problem is all of the valleys that have vegetation. Once you get down into that stuff on a machine, especially trying to follow wolves would put you in a circumstance of digging out the machine all day. Kinmon ran the same machine I'm running and there's no way that machine is built for mountain riding.

    I've argued with people before about trying to hunt via snowmachine off the haul road and there's no loop-hole in that state regulation to do it.

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