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Thread: Simple cabin hot water system

  1. #1
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    Default Simple cabin hot water system

    Here are a few images of the most simple yet so profoundly efficient cabin hot water system.



    This convection system operates on the principal that hot water rises. The stainless steal tank is fed with cold water at the bottom end (not visible). The tank connects to the stove via a copper line that is attached to a 2 inch diameter U-shape metal pipe, which heats the water as a fire is going in the stove. The heated water rises to the top of the tank. As a tab (sink or shower) is opened the drop in pressure powers a Jabsco in-line pump and delivers water. The now utilized water is instantly replaced through a 55 gal reservoir that is the "feeder" of the entire system (not visible).





    This is what you can't see: Through a T-fitting right after the "feeder" reservoir cold water can be obtained thus allowing the user to mix to the desired temperature. The hot water tank (in this case the stainless steal tank), MUST have a pressure release valve at the top end, dumping the hot water safely, should it ever come on. This tank also has a drain valve at the lowest point.

    Talk about luxury! Taking a shower at 50 below, or 50 above for that matter. Best of all, hot water will always be available, as one tends to have a fire in the wood burning stove anyways. A win-win situation, if there ever was one.

    Logging off, taking a shower now...

    Gord
    "He was a man of no patience, you could see it in him. That was a notch against him. In the wild country, a body needs patience".

  2. #2
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Default heat-powered fan

    I see you have one of those heat-powered fans on your stove. Does it work well and would you recommend it? I've seen them advertised and thought is was a good idea, but they are a bit pricey.

    BTW, nice hot water setup. My dad did something similar at his house with a heating tank in his wood stove that dumps through a thermostatic valve into the tank of the hotwater heater. So whenever he's running his wood stove (winter), it is taking most of the load off his electric hot water heater by circulating it to the wood stove heating element.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  3. #3
    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Default

    That looks like a real nice still you have there.

  4. #4
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Default

    Come on, everyone knows you don't use copper tubing on a still
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  5. #5

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    I like it...where did you find the tank?
    Wasilla Real Estate News
    www.valleymarket.com

  6. #6
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    Default

    JOAT, yes I quite like the three bladed ECO fan and find they provide a considerable difference in heat distribution. They make for a more comfy cabin interior especially when its really cold outside, plus it's the ambience

    Marty, I had Greer in Anc make the tank for me after I saw a similar tank made of galvanized iron which rusted badly at the bottom after many years of use. After I had this one made I found a non stainless tank for whole lot less, oh well.

    Showered up, feeling good

    Gord
    "He was a man of no patience, you could see it in him. That was a notch against him. In the wild country, a body needs patience".

  7. #7
    New member AKDSLDOG's Avatar
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    Default

    Great looking set up! I like it.

    ONLY BUY THE 3 BLADED ECO FAN, THE 2 BLADE ONES DON'T LAST. Ask me how I know.

  8. #8
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default Pressure?

    Just wondering how you are powering the pump? How long, time wise, can you run the hot water? I'm assuming that the 55 gal holding tank that feeds the hot water tank is on the inside? How do you supply water to the cabin? Thanks for taking the time to contribute to the cabin forum. You have been providing some great help and insight so some of the things that can be difficult. Do you have any more pics of the rest of your set up that you can share?

    Thanks again
    Tom

  9. #9
    Member trapperrick's Avatar
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    Default

    Sweet!! That is a brilliant system.

  10. #10
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    Default Good questions

    Tom

    The water system is pressured by a 2.5 GPM marine type 12 V on demand pump that turns on when the line pressure drops below 40 psi and vice versa. Pretty simple and reliable. The cabin battery bank itself is powered by sun and wind energy.

    The 55 gal holding tank is inside the cabin tucked away above the shower stall. I fill it via a sand point well hand pump. Again, very simple and reliable. And best of all, I can procure water all year round, even when the ambient temp is 50 below or colder. Well depth is approximately 10 feet, right under the cabin next to the sink. Very, very handy!

    http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...1309_200321309

    http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/water...PointWells.pdf

    New snow on the ground, good fire in the stove, Mannheim Steamrollers are playing, life ain't bad

    Gord
    "He was a man of no patience, you could see it in him. That was a notch against him. In the wild country, a body needs patience".

  11. #11
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Sweet.

    Great setup, Gord. Thanks for sharing!!

    Only thing that could be better would be some moose stew on the stove and a good dog at your feet.....

  12. #12
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    Default You are so right...

    Fullcurl, you said moose stew, oh my gawd, do I love moose stew, unreal!





    Or may be ptarmigan




    Presently enjoying Bob Marley & The Wailers, a nicely chilled glass of Chardonnay, Tillamock Sharp Cheddar and Pilot Bread, life is good, indeed!

    Gord
    "He was a man of no patience, you could see it in him. That was a notch against him. In the wild country, a body needs patience".

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