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Thread: What Type Of Rain Gear

  1. #1

    Post What Type Of Rain Gear

    Hey guys I have the MT050 rain gear from Cabelas and I havent been exactly happy with it. I think this stuff is just fine for me here in Montana where we are lucky to get 15" of rain a year but everytime I have been on a hunting trip where it is needed it only works for about two hours in a good steady rain and your soaked. My question to you is what type of rain gear is really going to keep a guy dry for a couple day Alaskan soaker????

  2. #2
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default HH

    Helly Hansen Impertech is the way to go. After several days it is the only thing that has kept me dry. A HH jacket and a pair of chest waders, seems to be my go to gear.

    Steve

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    IMMPERTEC!!!!!
    grundens makes some lightweight good stuff and even carhart has some decnet raingear out there, depending on what your doing.
    general rule, only use rain gear made of rubber with no material lining over overlayer ie MT050 or whatever it is/gortex/Rivers West..ect.
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

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    As previously mentioned, HH Impertech is really the only way to go. It isn't a waterproof breathable membrane like Gore-Tex, but it will actually keep you dry in Alaska. Important to wear lighweight layers underneath so you can remove clothes as needed to keep from overheating.

    Even a brand spanking new $400 North Face, Marmot, Mountain Hardware, Cabelas etc. Gore-Tex, Dry-Plus (or similar) jacket will soak through after several hours of constant rain. Waterproof/ breathable membranes ARE NOT 100% waterproof.

    My North Face Mountain Guide jacket soaks through after about 10 minutes of being wet. It's basicly a $300 windbreaker.

  5. #5
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeb View Post
    Even a brand spanking new $400 North Face, Marmot, Mountain Hardware, Cabelas etc. Gore-Tex, Dry-Plus (or similar) jacket will soak through after several hours of constant rain. Waterproof/ breathable membranes ARE NOT 100% waterproof.

    Thats why goretex waders don't work

    check out this podcast http://www.itinerantangler.com/podcasts/podcast29.mp3 its very informative on goretex technology...

    I personally like frogg toggs because of their packibility if I'm anywhere in the rain shawdow of the state because it doesn't rain that much, here in southeast I like plastic pants, I have grundens herculese and they are heavy but not that heavy but I wear a lowe alpine triple point ceramic jacket made out of goretex and this is my 3rd season with it and it keeps me dry... I even had a job on the Alaska Penninsula this summer and it kept me dry there, I didn't even bring my plastic coat down to southeast because the goretex performs so well... So I would reccomend gore tex over plastic as long as you weren't just sitting around, the waterproofness of goretex depends on the vapor pressure gradient between the inside and outside so if the air inside the jacket is not warmer than the outside of the jacket you will get wet (listen to above podcast)... Oh yea and keep your coat clean if you don't the pores clog and get wet...

    If you are sitting around or on boats in rough weather or something like that then wear plastic. I like grundens and guy cotton and would never get anything else, carharts might improve their gear but the coat I got from them fell apart after half a season of set netting...
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Has anyone tried any of the Kooldri rain gear? Barneys has it and is selling it as the replacement of the HH 3/4 length guide coat. Here's a link to the site:

    http://www.kooldrirainwear.com/parka.asp

    I'd really like to know if this works as well as the HH.

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    Default helly hansen

    Helly Hansen is great for keeping you dry on the outside, but if you are hiking at the same time, you will probably get soaked on the inside. The best help for that is some polypro type of lightweight underneath and dress light so you can try to avoid overheating.

  8. #8

    Default Dry

    My favorite is the Helly Hansen Impertech. It is light and fairly quiet. I do not think they make the 3/4 length parka any more. It is great with hip boots. I like their bibs also. My MT50 coat is ok but will not repel the rain like Impertech. I have never had any Gortex item that did not eventually leak. I can never stay completely dry in a heavy rain if moving much. The water finds away in and if your moving much you perspire. I prefer to lay in a wall tent on a cot with a good book in a down pour. Hard to do on a back pack hunt. I'm getting old.

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    Default Searching for PVC/nylon lining raingear

    Twenty years ago, I bought a camo PVC jacket with bibs from Costco. The label said "AVID." It had cuffs on the sleeves and a nylon lining, making it very comfortable, warm, and dry - even in a downpour. It was fanstatic for blocking the wind and rain when riding in an open river boat or on an ATV in inclement weather. I would layer under it if needed. I wore that puppy out and replaced it with a bright yellow version with the label "SANTINA" about 10 years ago. It also came from Costco. It looks like the identical garment but in a different color. The lining is starting to rip. But I'll be darn if I can find a replacement. Both have big outer pockets fro stowing items.

    Any leads where a guy could find a PVC/nylo lined jacket of this type in this world now dominated by expensive wonder fabrics that leak? I would buy at least three to last me the remainder of my time afield. I have the HH Impertech for sheep hunting, but prefer the nylon lined PVC for ATV/boat use.

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    Default old school military rain gear.

    I used to have an old school olive drab rubber rain suite. I was stuck in a down poor for hours and i was as dry as I could be. I wore a wool sweater and set of the long underware with the trap door. The rain suite had velcro tabs around the ankles(BIBS) and wrists, and a hood(PARKA) with a bill on it. I think I am going to have to hit up a surplus store.

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    Default No perfect raingear

    I like hally hanson the old heavy fishing stuff when on a boat or on a sporting scope. Like the impertech when one has to be mobile, Like frog toggs with you go for a walk-a-bout on a goat or sheep hunt. Problem with gortex is the pressure from the hard rain forces it though the pours. Like 338 mag said when it pouring sideways, I like to be wearing a tent. Undergarments like under armour followed by wool and layed is just as important.

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    +1 on the Helly Hansen Impertech.
    "The days a man spends fishing or spends hunting should not be deducted from the time he's on earth. " Theodore Roosevelt

  14. #14

    Default raingear

    I haven't used HH impertech yet, but obviously have heard great things. I also think it depends on where/what you're hunting here. I agree with PowderMonkey on FroggToggs-----I love em if you're not in thick brush where you may be more likely to tear them. Plus they're cheap. For more brushy conditions, on say a sheep hunt, I broke down and got some of the KoolDri. They work great and they're 1/2 the weight of Impertech. They also dry faster than precip for any condensation inside or wetness outside.

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    Wink

    "Thats why goretex waders don't work"
    I can't understand why they don"t seem to be able to make good bretheable rain gear! My Orvis Silver label waders work 100% of the time, and i"ve used them for years, and years! Not one problem! Bill
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

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    On Goretex, it really is not open to opinion or subjectiveness, Goretex IS BOTH waterproof and breathable, it is a fact. It is literally substantially easier for a human body to run through a heavy gauge chain link fence without touching it than it is for water to be forced through Goretex. The amount of water or pressures from being many meters underwater aren't going to make any difference at all.

    Water molecules are astronomically larger than the pores in the fabric and the pores are hundreds of times larger than water vapor molecules allowing them to pass. It is a fabric, it cannot be washed or worn off. It continues to be used by the biggest names in outdoor and survival gear, meets mil-spec.

    Your satisfaction is unconditionally guaranteed for its waterproofness, breathability, and windproofness. Either repair, replace, or refund. It is the Craftsman tool of outdoor wear.

  17. #17

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    My Cabelas MT050 rainjacket gets soaked very easily, after minutes in heavy rain. The problem is when I'm in the field and its cold outside the jacket will not dry over the night and is still wet or frozen the next day.

    I have 2 military goretex jackets which perform much better in that case, but these are not very quiet.

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    Your satisfaction with a goretex garment may ultimately come down to the garment manufacturer and the design of the garment for its intended use. Gore is a supplier of one element of the garment. Frankly without researching it, I don't know if Gore makes any branded consumer products. I know I don't own any. I am also not sure of the quality control relationship between Gore and its end users.

    The products that I own with Goretex are North Face, Columbia, 10X, Oregon Research, Vasque, Meridian, Marmot, the others I'd have to go look at the tag.

    But Goretex is what it is, absolutely waterproof, windproof, and breathable. IMO it is appropriate to critique a particular garment model but again IMO the Goretex membrane has proven itself by science, stringent and extensive field testing.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed M View Post
    On Goretex, it really is not open to opinion or subjectiveness, Goretex IS BOTH waterproof and breathable, it is a fact. .

    Sorry but there is no such thing! WaterProof does not equal Breathable, no matter what kind of tests are done and articles written. Been there done that, have bought lots of multi hundred dollar GoreTex apparrel that was completely useless to me. The only answer to being completely dry is a completely waterproof jacket and pants/bibs (ie Impertech, Grundens), and appropriate synthetic performance underwear or clothes that keeps your body from heating up too much. IME if it blocks water from getting in, it also blocks it from getting out, thats my definition of waterproof.

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    AC,

    By your own definition, Goretex is waterproof. You're right, goretex will not allow water out anymore than it will let it in. Stand a goretex wader in water and not a drop of water will come in. Take the same wader, dry it, and fill it with water, not a single drop will come out. It is perfectly waterproof. It has to be, a water molecule is 20000 times larger than the goretex pores. It would be like trying to push a bowling ball through the eye of a needle.

    Take that same wader and try to flop it upside down in the water to create an air bubble inside the wader, absolutely impossible. The air will easily pass through, you will never be able to keep it inflated for even a short time, clearly breathable. It has to be, a vapor molecule is 700 times smaller than the goretex pores. It would be like trying to hold water inside nylon stockings.

    How can you be sure that water molecules are a lot smaller than vapor molecules. Take 2 rubber balloons, similar to your rubber rainwear, blow one up, fill the other with water. Wait an hour, a day, a week, a month, a year. The balloon will still be holding water in a year, but the one with the air will be going soft in an hour. Even the rubber is permeable to air molecules, albeit too slow to keep up with our body output rate, but not water.

    Take one of your multi hundred dollar garments, like the flat panel on the back of a jacket, create a little tub with it by putting it over a bowl and fill it with water, the water will not leak out, now fill a sink or tub and try to make a bubble under the panel, you won't, the air leaks right through.

    Don't take my word for it, talk to someone with a chemical, physics, or science background. Ask them about water molecules versus vapor molecules and permeability.

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