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Thread: My First (used) Snowmachine!

  1. #1
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    Talking My First (used) Snowmachine!

    Good Morining!!

    I have just purchased my first snowmachine! I am super pumped and can't wait for some of the white stuff to start falling so we can get out and go for a spin. I do have a few questions that I thought would be best answered by you knowledgeable folks on the snowmachine forum.

    I have obtained a copy of the manual for the machine from SkiDoo, and plan to follow their recommendations for checking the machine's components prior to heading out for our first ride. I am curious to know if any of you folks could offer any supplemental advice to what the manual states (ie is there a grease which will work better in cold climates, petrolium based(WD-40) or not, etc)? Are there any things that I should look closely at and examine, such as parts of snowmachines that tend to wear out regularly, or parts of the snowmachine that ultra cold temps may negativley effect?

    I understand this is a broad question, and since I am new to snowmachining in general, I am probably not making a whole bunch of sense, but I figured it was worth a shot to see what advice some of you more experienced folks could offer. Oh, and I live in Palmer, if that makes any difference.

    Thanks in advance for any thoughts or tips!

    Cheers!

    Jake

  2. #2
    New member AKDSLDOG's Avatar
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    Default

    First thing is FIRST! Take pictures of it, close ups of any "dings or scratches". Write down the ser# of the snowmachine and motor, write down the year/make/model and register it through the DMV, keep the registration at "home" in a safe place. Now you should be semi covered if you run into a missfortune such as I have this past week.

    As far as maintenance goes, follow you manual, it's pretty basic stuff. Read your manual over a few times so that if you are out and about and something does happen you can remember what/how to fix it. Most of the riding done in south central AK you can get away with a tube of plain old red auto grease. If you feel differantly about cold weather, any auto store will carry "EXTREME COLD WEATHER" grease. I see alot of people buy solely "polaris", "skidoo", "yamaha" products, but its not nessasary. If it's a two stroke, I would suggest sticking with the manufactures recomindation injection oil. But other then that, have fun and congrads on your new toy!

  3. #3
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    Default Thanks for the relpy,...

    and my condolences on your recent loss....I can't imagine how that must feel to have your home violated by some Jack***** who can't tell right from wrong. I will take your advice to heart and register that puppy asap! I hope things take a positive turn for you and your family.

    I am really stoked about getting a snowmachine. It's strange though, as I grew up in Minnesota, I never had or got into snowmachineing (or, ahem, snowmobiling...be gentle!). I guess I was always busy with school or hunting or something else! Oh, well! My time has come!

    Thanks again for the advice,

    Jake

  4. #4
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Go review the maintenance suggestions I posted to the following thread...

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=17843

    Most should be relevant to your machine as well.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  5. #5
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    Default WOW!

    JOAT - Thats a TON of great information! Just what I was looking for! I appreciate your time posting that link for me! I printed it off and I will keep that close at hand as I get this machine tuned up! Thanks a ton!

    Cheers!

    Jake

  6. #6
    Member Rod in Wasilla's Avatar
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    So... what kind of sled did you get? You said it was a Skidoo, so I'll recommend the Dootalk website. There are a lot of VERY knowledgable people on their forum that reall know their stuff and are more than willing to help out.

    www.dootalk.com
    Quote Originally Posted by northwestalska
    ... you canít tell stories about the adventures you wished you had done!

  7. #7
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    Default Great!

    Thanks for the Link! I will definetley check it out! Its a 1991 Skidoo Mach 1 600 (643?). Got it running the other night, but its pretty rough. We'll see what I can do with it in the next few days....

    Thanks for the help!

    Cheers!

    Jake

  8. #8
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    Question Emergency Tool Kit and Bump

    Hello Friends!

    Just wanted to bump this thread and pick at your brains again. I got the machine up and running like a champ. After cleaning the carbs, flushing the fuel tank (sugar!?!?!) and installing all new tubing for the fuel lines, she is firing up nicely and rides like a dream. Still alot of tune-up work to do yet, and the idle is a bit low, but I am fine tuning that as I go. Next thing is to flush the coolant tank and replace those hoses.

    I wanted to ask about emergency tool kits for snowmachines as well. The manual that I have has the part numbers and info for the factory tool kit which I assume came with this machine when it was new. I suppose I could call the dealer and see if they have complete tool kits that I could buy, but I think it would be much cheaper to outfit it myself with tools that I already have. But there may be some things that I don't know, like can any rope be used for the recoil starter, or do some work better than others, etc?

    SO........

    What have your collective experiences been in putting together tool kits for sleds? Everyting but the kitchen sink? Bare Bones? Something in the middle? I don't intend on doing anything too extreme or too remote this year, but I am planning on heading to Lake Louise for the New Year and that is a big lake. I guess I just want to be prepared.

    Anyways, please let me know what your thoughts are on putting together a reasonable tool kit for a used sled (1991 Skidoo Mach 1 (643)).

    Once again, thanks for your time and knowledge! It is greatly appreciated!

    Cheers!

    Jake

  9. #9
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Factory tool kits don't have much in them. Usually a cheap plug wrench, stamped steel wrench, screwdriver, and the "emergency pull rope". I wouldn't shortcut the tool kit as it will be your most important friend out on the trail. I never go "bare bones" as you call it. My standard kit covers things pretty well, but if the planned outing is long or remote bring more stuff. Also, work with your riding partners. If you're riding with the same group, you guys can kind of split up the tool kit responsibilities so that no single sled has all the tools, but everyone has some of the tools. Some basic duplication is good, but the special tools can be divided up.

    You can do much better on your own. The screwdriver can be taken care of with a bit-type driver that has various bits stored inside the handle. But it can also be good to have a fairly large flat tip that can double as a small pry bar. And don't forget to include whatever drivers you need to get into your carb adjustments, including a jet wrench.

    A small crescent wrench is OK, but you might also add combination wrenches for your most common bolt sizes (look at what you need to get into on your sled and bring those sizes). Make sure you have a good spark plug wrench of the proper size. You might also consider a wrench big enough to get your rear suspension mounts and adjustments.

    Don't forget bailing wire, zip ties, electrical tape, duct tape, spare plugs, headlight bulb, etc.

    As for the starter rope, if you replace the original rope with a kernmantle braided Spectra or Kevlar climber's accessory cord of the same size as your original, you'll never have to worry about that rope again. Check with your local rock climbing supplier and you can also get a color that matches your sled. The "emergency rope" from the tool kit is nothing more than a length of cord with a knot in one end and a small "T" handle at the other. You pull off the recoil starter housing, hook the knotted end on one of the prongs on the cup, wind the rope around it and pull. Hopefully the rope comes off the engine at the end, but be ready to let the whole thing go and kill the motor if it gets hung up and tries to suck you in. (i.e. do not wrap the end of the rope around your wrist or tie a loop in it in place of the "T" handle!)
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  10. #10

    Default Shared information.

    I'll share what was told to me....While you are working on your sled or ATV in your garage/shop each tool you use needs to be put aside. The pile of tools you needed to work on it is what is needed. Pretty simple.

    If you are able to use a "adjustable wrench" in place of having a handful of sockets..great. If you can get a screwdriver with change-out tips..great.

    To expand on that...if you are going to just plan on light duty work and nothing major (because you don't know how or you will be close to where you can get towed or whatever reason) you will have a light tool kit. If you are planning big trips and have the know-how then your kit will be bigger.

    This is how I build my kits. The factory ones are...hmmmm.."pretty, but usually not practical".

    Hope it helps.

  11. #11
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    Default Thanks!

    Awesome! I appreciate your advice, and I think I understand that the type of riding you will be doing will dictate what supplies you bring along. I will assemble my kits as such.

    Again, thanks for taking time to help a new snowmachiner out!

    Cheers!

    Jake

  12. #12

    Default new used sled

    I am going to purchase a 2003 pro x 800 with a 136 2" paddle it has about 1800 miles on it does any one know of any problems with this type of sled? I dont do any high marking iam just into boon docking and some minor trails but i think i will love the power. Thanks for any response.
    Big Daddy

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