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Thread: Alaska Information Needed

  1. #1
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    Default Alaska Information Needed

    Montana is getting a little to crowded for me. I have been looking at remote properties in Alaska but with the sheer size and diversity of the place, I am lost as to a region that would be a good place to buy some land.

    I am looking strictly for remote property. I foresee this as being a year-round residence. I am experienced in build log structures with hand tools, flintknapping, self bow building etc.

    I realize much of Alaska requires extensive travel to hunt but I would only be interested in an area that has populations of big game within a days walk of the property. I also would like to be near some mountains and good fishing waters.

    This is just the beginning of a search.Any help would be much appreciated.

  2. #2
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Bob,
    How about a little more information.

    How far do you want to be from a city with medical, shopping etc....

    Mode of transportation - Do you want to be able to drive, boat, jet boat, ATV, fly or a combination to your property?

    Do you like negative temperatures or do you prefer warmer?

    Do you need to work?

    Do you prefer fresh or salt water fish.

    Greenhouse? Garden? Gathering?

    Thanks,
    Mike

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    As I said, this move is in infancy stages and I haven't really though most things through. That is why I am here.

    We are pretty self sustaining now. We grow, gather, hunt and fish for most of our food now. I currently have a greenhouse and a root cellar. I assume a root cellar is out of the question in most of Alaska though. I assume there are areas where gardening is viable. As for fishing, crab and shrimp sound great but salmon, trout, pike etc would suffice.

    Temperature is not a huge issue. I live at 4500 feet in Montana now. Winters are long and we always have our below zero spells (usually a month total out of the winter). I am not interested in an area where it is below zero for months on end though.

    I don't know what is reasonable as far distance from a town with medical etc. We aren't shoppers but obviously would need supplies at times. I couldn't care less about medical. I do medical. The farther the better, I suppose. I definitely don't want to purchase in an area that will be a suburb in 10 years. Been there done that.

    I don't need work.

    I am open to mode of transportation although I am not a pilot.

    I have noticed that most places listed heat with propane or oil, is there anything against wood or is wood not available? Also, most places I've seen have been built with hauled in material. Again, are logs not available or are there laws against cutting?

    Thanks for the fast reply,
    Bob

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    Default Come on up

    Bob

    Come on up, visit, look around, check things out, see for yourself. Best way to go about it!

    You appear to be very set in your ways, kind of challenging to advise. You also appear to be monetarily and otherwise independent, that makes for a promising base to build on, literally.

    Any relation to "Formerly Montana Bob" who hangs out here?

    Good luck!

    Gord
    "He was a man of no patience, you could see it in him. That was a notch against him. In the wild country, a body needs patience".

  5. #5
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    There is a piece of property for sale in the Swap and Sell Forum on Lake Clark. That is where I dream of retiring. Great hunting and fishing, far from population centers, nice climate, and everything else.

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    I plan on coming up for a looksee but where? A person could spend a lifetime and $millions, the place is huge.

    No relation to Montana Bob.

    I know quite a few Montanans who live part-time in Alaska but none are in what I would consider a "remote" location.

    I guess I am set in my ways in that I know what I want. I have learned from mistakes. I am looking to be debt free and self sustaining. I definitely don't want to buy a place that will be overrun with Jane Fonda types, like my beloved Bitterroot, in 10 years.

    I'll check out the property on Clark Lake, thanks.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Fly into Port Alsworth on Lake Clark. Awesome, awesome, awesome country! Apparently the land in question isn't connected to Port Alsworth itself, but that would be the hub. Access would be primarily by airplane or boat.

    There are also remote land parcels on some of the islands in Southeast Alaska. Fantastic fishing and hunting, but lots and lots of rain. Some folks can't handle that.

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    Your temperature description pushes the interior region lower on the list. Obviously you want to avoid the entire Anchorage & Mat-Su Valley areas. For fish, game, and gardening at a remote location you have many to choose from throughout the south central region. Look at everything from the Kenai Peninsula wrapping around the Chugach National Forest to Prince William Sound, amongst many others.

    I would take your map of Alaska and black out native lands, federal lands, state lands, the national forests and wildlife refuges (that cuts off most of the state). Black out Anchorage and the Mat-Su (area around Palmer and Wasilla). What you have left in the southern 1/3rd of the state are the areas where you might consider first. Now you'll need to look at land availability that matches those areas. I'm sure folks can answer questions about specific areas on that map where you find property listings.

    In answer to your other questions, yes you can cut wood on private land and in many cases on public land (there are specific public land areas that are off limits to wood cutting). Yes you can burn wood for heat and many do. Yes you can cut logs for cabin construction. If you see propane or oil listed as a heating source, that means the property is located close enough to civilization for those products to be delivered by highway. But there are many areas in Alaska where you could live a few miles off a highway and still be quite "remote" without worry of a subdivision showing up anytime soon.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Your temperature description pushes the interior region lower on the list.
    Not anything against JOAT but don't let interior weather stop you. I was born in Whitefish and grew up in Missoula and Whitefish. I know western Montana. I moved to Fairbanks in 1991 when I was 31.

    MontanaBob, 20 below in Fairbanks doesn't feel like 20 below in the Bitterroot. It's dry here. (In fact, Interior Alaska is considered a "desert climate" as far as humidity.) I'd take 30 below in Fairbanks over 20 below down the Bitterroot any day. That was the first thing I noticed my first winter here. Now, of course 30-50 below is cold but it does have it advantages. Keeps some folks away for one thing. And, you just build your home and lifestyle to deal with it. It's really no biggie. Also, we only get those kinds of extremes occaisionaly and usually not for very long. If it's 30 or 40 below for 3 weeks that's a long time. Usually it's only a few days at a time. The other thing is temperature inversions. Currently our home is in downtown Fairbanks (we too are looking for remote property though and looking to move towards self sufficiency). Fairbanks is about 500ft elevation. It can be 20 or 30 below at our house and 20 above in the surrounding hills 1500 ft higher. This happens regularly in the interior. The guy that owns the ski area I ski patrol at north of town 25 miles has seen it 40 below in Fairbanks and 40 above at Skiland on in the same day! We also get chinooks that blow in. I've seen it 40 above and thawing in Fairbanks in January. It can go from 30 below to 30 above literally overnight. It's crazy. The weather in Fairbanks can be 90 above in the summer and down to 50 below or colder in the winter. We have not had below zero weather yet this winter and it has been winter for us since October. I've seen 40 below on Thanksgiving day. This year it was 40 above.

    MontanaBob. I feel your pain about Montana and the Bitterroot. It's my old stompin grounds. I grew up watching my hunting areas slowly get swallowed up by "progress". My grampa taught me to hunt and fish in the Flathead valley. I've spent many day floating the Bitteroot also. I suggest moving to Alaska before you buy anything. Pick an area like Fairbanks for example. Get a place to live and then spend a year or so learning about Alaska.

    My ol' buddy still lives in Missoula and is fixin to move back to Alaska. He and I made the journey north together in 91. He went back to Montana and is ready to bag it and come back.

    We have come close to buying property a couple times but in weighing all the pros and cons, we haven't bought yet. A lot of our decisions were based on knowledge that we have of the area because we live here. We would have had some big surprises if we would have "bought blind" so to speak.

    North to Alaska MontanaBob!!
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  10. #10
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Debt free is a great thing. Having a monthly income without working is what dreams are made of.

    IMO - If you have 1000 a month incoming without working you can live semi remote.

    If you have 1500 a month incoming you can live pretty remote.

    What if you are a trapper and do well. What if you are a miner and do well?

    If I were looking for a remote area without huge travel expenses I would look at the following areas accessable without an airplane.

    Talkeetna.

    Petersville road/Oilwell road/Shuilin lake trail.

    Lake Louise and surrounding areas.

    Chitna.

    If you can afford a plane trip once in a while look near Swentna/Yentna/Lake Creek/Fish Creek area.

    This is from my limited traveling/exploring.

    Good luck in your ventures.

    PM if you have questions.

    Mike

    Moose pass area.

  11. #11
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    Default Good posts

    Joat, Snyd and dirt, good posts.

    Even I do not live on the Kenai Peninsula I always thought it is ONE great place. You are off the main population center, yet close enough to satisfy any potential medical or similar need rather quickly. You have access to acute care facilities if the need arises. The "shopping opportunities" are great localy, the schooling as well. Yet you can get "away from it all" in no time, you are in the hills or the coast, semi remote or totally of the grid if one wishes to opt for that. Recreational opportunities are truly splendid with its rivers, backcountry, coastline and off shore. The temps are decent, the folks are neighborly. Land is affordable and its value is prone to increase in value.

    Alaska is inherently expensive, which becomes quite prevelent as soon as you move off the road system. At the end of the day, it boils down to the very basic mathematical principle of balancing input verses output. And be happy with it. Real happy.

    I like to recommend a most excellent book to anyone interested in reading and learning about "them days gone by". One hardly finds it on the "popular Alaska must read books". It's called "Alaska's No.1 Guide, The History and Journals of Andrew Berg, 1869 - 1939", by Catherine Cassidy and Gary Titus, ISBN 0-9720144-0-3

    http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/pro..._no1_guide.htm

    Clear, 15 degrees, the very best of celtic Christmas music playing, a good fire in the stove, java in the French press, life ain't bad!

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    Default Ideas


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    You can always look at my website too. :-) www.valleymarket.com

    Just kidding. I don't deal in remote.

    To me remote means that you can't drive to it, but I think you could find what you wanted off the Petersville Road West of Trapper Creek.
    Wasilla Real Estate News
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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtofak View Post
    Debt free is a great thing. Having a monthly income without working is what dreams are made of.

    IMO - If you have 1000 a month incoming without working you can live semi remote.

    If you have 1500 a month incoming you can live pretty remote.


    How much do you need to live totally remote? With a trip by plane to town once a month?

    Ron

  15. #15

    Default The trip by plane to town once a month

    That's going to cost some bucks...I'm not sure of the current rates so someone will set me straight on the exact amounts.

    But lets say you only need a 180 and not a beaver or something. I think you can get a 180 for maybe $200 per hour. If you are not real remote, only a 1 hour flight, thats $800 once a month. That's a pretty big chunk of change.

    You should probably try to find someplace on a river that you can take your own boat to. Snowmachine in the winter, boat in the summer. Stay put during freezup and breakup.

    Better to have one big trip to town in the fall for supplies, fly out for Christmas to visit relatives and maybe one more trip between Christmas and break up. Only 4-5 trips a year, not 12.

    In a lot of places after you get to know some of the locals with planes, they will fly in to check on you, and maybe even bring some supplies in for you.
    Wasilla Real Estate News
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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Now are the numbers per person at 1000 or 1500?

    Ron

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    Default Coastal Areas

    If you can handle a little rain Alaska`s coastal areas offer an amazing amount of subsistance resources both seafood and big game. Just last week the Kodiak Is. Brough sold several tax forclosed remote parcels for under 20 grand. No moose but lots of sitka deer on Kodiak

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    snyd!!!!! u need to go vist dan w at Freds (west) in sporting goods 7am to 10am tue thur ? or so u guys played in the same neck of the woods and he got here in 91 to
    Last edited by atvalaska; 12-04-2007 at 23:29. Reason: name!!!

  19. #19
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    If I were to go remote (or semi-remote). I would look at less than an hour VIA boat or wheeler in the summer and less than an hour VIA snowmachine in the winter. I would look for a river or lake system that can be accessed from a roadway OR an ATV/snowmachine trail into the property. Unfortunately, there are people that will damage or steal your vehicle when parked. Maybe find a lodge owner or someone else that will allow you to park near an establishment?

  20. #20
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    Thanks everyone. Lots of good information. I am going to come up this summer before I consider any purchase. Now, thanks to all of you I have some areas to explore.

    Snyd, it really is heartbreaking what is happening to Montana. I still love it here but the estimates are the Bitterroot will triple in population in the next 15 years. We already have declining air quality due to the inversions. Fortunately, I live high on the west side at about 4200 feet, which usually keeps me above the inversion. The Bitterroot isn't big enough for 90,000 people. At least not with me living here.

    Anyone else know about the Keyes Point properties on Lake Clark? I guess Port Alsworth is a place to restock and is 8 miles across the lake.

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