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Thread: Big Gun Leather Post your pics

  1. #1

    Default Big Gun Leather Post your pics

    How do you all carry those large framed revolvers while in the field hiking,fishing or hunting??

    Lets see some pics!

  2. #2

    Default

    Check the X-15 from Bianchi. Mine (they look like the same thing, though neither of mine are labeled) are more than 20 years old and still going strong. They have an open or "clam-shell" front, so you don't have to pull way up to get the gun free. Unsnap the retainer strap, then lever down and away from your body to free up the gun. Really secure, fast as can be, and mine don't get in the way of any pack I've used.

  3. #3
    Member AKdutch's Avatar
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    Default X-15

    I really like your holster, but they don't show it fitting a ruger redhawk. What are you carrying in yours? and do you think a 5.5" Redhawk would fit? John

  4. #4

    Default

    I alternate between an N-frame S/W 8 3/8" and a Redhawk 7 1/2" in the longer one and a 6" N-frame and 5.5" Redhawk in the other. If it's long enough, the N-frame version I have is perfect for the Redhawk. Haven't tried it with a 500, but I don't think it would work so well for that. Besides, my 500 is 4".

  5. #5
    Member alaskamace's Avatar
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    Default

    I carry my Ruger .454 is a pancake holster made by Rob Leahy. I just ordered another holster from him, quality and craftmanship is outstanding. Can't beat his prices either!
    ..."Tolerance is the virtue of a man without convictions." - G.K. Chesterton

  6. #6
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    Default

    I've been carrying my 480 Ruger Super Redhawk with 7-1/2" barrel in a Galco D.A.O. holster. This holster lets you carry it right-handed (right side) side draw, or right-handed (on left side) cross draw. I like it because I don't even notice that the gun is there, even when I get in the truck and buckle up (driver's side). I'd recommend this holster. See thread http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=21752 for a picture.

    Brian

  7. #7
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    Default This is my Big'un

    I just had this one built by Diamond D Leather in Chugiak.

    Notice the trigger guard is covered, and that it has an adjustable friction screw, as well as a Thumb Release.

    It holds the (S&W Mdl 29, 44 Mag, 6" barrel.) tight, but it comes out fast and easy, which could be important in an emergency.

    The one I had before, (Hunter brand) was crap by comparison. I'm VERY happy with this one.

    Smitty of the North
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    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  8. #8
    Member akflyer's Avatar
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    Thumbs up This is what I use for my S&W 500 4"

    This is David Johnsons rig out of Eagle River, quality backed products, wears great with anything you have on. Lefty or righty, Email if you have any questions.
    Lynn
    Eagle River
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  9. #9
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    Default Carrying large revovers while hiking

    Where (on your body) to carry a large frame long barreled revolver when hiking?

    I have found three locations convenient.

    1) My favorite backpack can accomodate a large pistol alongside the right side of the frame where I can reach it over my shoulder. Drawback, I cannot reach it with my off-side (left) hand at all and putting it back on my belt each time I take off my pack takes time.

    2) One I have not tried: Clipped to the shoulder or chesk straps of my backpack. Again, transfer to my belt when I drop the backpack takes time.

    3) My favorites: In a right-hand cross-draw holster either over my appendix or just to the left of my belt buckle. Easy and fast to draw with my right hand and fairly easy to reach with my left. This can be either on the backpack belt, a separate belt, or your pant's belt. Whatever works best. It is good to have the backpack take the weight whichever way you go. Drawbacks: With the appendix carry, be careful not to pee on the muzzle end of the holster. With the left side carry, the muzzle end of the holster might interfere with the swing of the left hand if the barrel is very long or carry position far to the left.

    Holster choice:
    Any forward cant holster should work well at the beltline. With option 2, I am not sure what would work best, but I would probably go for an upside-down carry with a flap or thumb-break holster for positive retention.

    Never considered before, but having some merit:
    If your sleeping bag is rolled up below the bottom of your pack, stuff the pistol in the center of the roll. Drawing would be similar to any typical small-of-the-back holster. Also the gun is well protected from snagging by brush. Drawback, off-hand draw is impossible. Advantage: You COULD get by without a holster at all, but do consider use of a lanyard.

    Happy hiking.

    Larry

  10. #10
    Member barrowdave's Avatar
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    Default Ours

    Here is how we carry our Dan Wesson .44mag and S&W 460 with 8 3/8 in barrel.
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  11. #11

    Default

    I have the Bianchi 5BHL Sz. 12 RH. It fits the gun really well with a very smooth draw, and high-quality craftsmanship.





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