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Thread: what the heck is this part, sprg 1903

  1. #1
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Default what the heck is this part, sprg 1903

    While giving my Grandmas gun an oiling, these 2 parts fell out from the action what are they. These came off a spring field 1903. Around the action area. the gun does have a redfield peep, but I dont think they came off that.

  2. #2
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Default

    I guess to be more clear, where do they go. I have no idea, they just fell out.

  3. #3
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Okay I figured it out. Its an ejector or something. Also what does the on/off lever do on this gun?

  4. #4

    Default Springfield

    The on/off lever is a throw back to the days of the late 1800's, the lever is a magazine cutoff, enabling the rifle to be used single shot, thereby saving the remaining 5 rds in the clip as emergency ammo in a combat situation. An old idea to say the least. Chris....

  5. #5

    Default On/Off lever

    I have a U.S. Remington Model 1903 and wasn't aware of the magazine cutoff. Thanks for the tip Chris! The On/Off lever also releases the bolt.

  6. #6
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Default

    Sure looks like the ejector and ejector pin to me.

    The purpose of the magazine cut off is three fold.

    (1) To allow bolt full function, without follower stopping the forward bolt return to battery.

    (2) Allows for the rifleman to dry fire the rifle.

    (3) Used for inspection arms command.

    Without a modified follower the bolt will be stopped in the forward movement after the last round out. This makes the rifleman reload the magazine. In combat people get excited, so this was a good indicator that the rifleman needed to follow a corrective action when the bolt could not be put back in the battery position or forward position.

    I wish you had better pictures of the pin, I can not tell if that is a shadow at the top of the pin head or a tab.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Its a shadow. I got the pin put back. Found a diagram on the net. So what position should this thing be in for normal carry in the field. Off? I can dry fire with it on or off.

  8. #8
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    UP! If you want it to feed.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  9. #9
    Member Darreld Walton's Avatar
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    Default ON-OFF Magazine Cutoff

    Indeed, this piece is a throwback, or holdover from the Krag. US Military minds hadn't quite gotten it through their heads at the time that there wasn't much use for a single shot weapon, and the cutoff was meant to be an ammunition saving device. Right. The thought was to keep the magazine full, switch it to 'off', thereby making the bolt short-stroke the mag, and you'd have to use the rifle as a single shot until your position was rushed, when you could switch the magazine 'on', and use the reserve rounds.
    In a sporting rifle, it's useless. Leave it to 'on', and forget it till you want to pull the bolt.
    The parts in your picture are indeed the ejector and ejector pin. The pin is generally slotted, making some folks think it's a screw, but it's not. With a bit of wear, they fall out when the rifle's removed from the stock. No biggie, just don't lose it.

  10. #10
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    Default Springfiled ejector and pin

    Make sure you get the ejector installed in the right direction - the beveled side goes to the rear so the flat edge catches the base of the shell. The hard of the pin is slotted so that if the slot is slightly widen it will stay in place by the interference of the widen head. Otherside it is held in palce by the stock when the gun is assemblied.

    FYI- Many of the early cutoffs were polished bright on one side the early guns - it was easy to spot if the cutoof was in the "On or Off" position. I've also notice that some of the stocks were also blackened in the early guns around the cutoff recess - apparently for the same reason.

    The cutoff also had another function - it locked in the Peterson device on the Mark 1 rifles.

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