Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Bipod For Sheep Hunt

  1. #1
    Member FALCON's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Enumclaw, Wa
    Posts
    176

    Default Bipod For Sheep Hunt

    The 2 last tapes I saw, both dudes had bipods. Is this something I should consider? I will be flown in with a cub, and hunt out of the base camp with my guide with the possibilty of some overnight spike camps.

  2. #2

    Default

    I always carry a bipod. Its one of those things you will only need if you don't have it with you.

  3. #3

    Default

    Shooting sticks can be less cumbersome though.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    422

    Default Trick I Learned

    Here's a trick I learned from a poster on this forum several years ago.

    If you use a walking stick, slide it in the outer cross straps of your pack. Set you pack on the ground upright and extend the walking stick to the length you desire. Instant shooting tripod.

    Can't say I've ever used it, but it makes sense.

    -Carnivore

  5. #5
    Member FALCON's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Enumclaw, Wa
    Posts
    176

    Default bipod

    Carnivore:

    I use trekking poles, and I also use the Just one pack. Maybe I could rig something up. The though of packing a tripod around has never excited me, however, I want to make sure I have all the weapons necessary to make a good shot at Mr. RAM!

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    143

    Default No to bipods

    I have used my trekking poles and /or my pack for sheep hunts. Bipods are too much extra weight to carry.

  7. #7
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    650

    Default shooting rest.

    i don't use trekking poles. you can use the tripod for your spotting scope and rig up a rest that will click into the tripod. works well for me. or shoot off of your pack.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    10

    Default v rest

    I've got a v rest that mounts nicely to my tripod. Works great and adds about 4 oz to my pack. I also shoot of my pack in the prone position.

    N8

  9. #9
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    44

    Default

    If you can get your guide to pack them in, I'd take them. Otherwise I just take my jacket and put on some rocks or my pack as a rest. Every ounce counts when you have to carry them in and out on your back.

  10. #10
    Member shphtr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    1,375

    Default rifle rest for sheep hunting

    Whatever you finally find that works for you make sure that you place the forearm of your rifle on the rest and make sure you pad the forearm from the rest o/w your point of impact will change significantly. This of course does not apply if you are using a Harris bipod (or something similar) but is in reference to a rest. I usually carry a small block of foam when hunting Asian sheep where the shooting distances are usually in the 300 to 500+yd range to use as a pad - hat, jacket, gloves, pack, etc would all surfice also - it is the isolation of the forearm from direct contact with your rest that is important.

  11. #11
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    97

    Thumbs up SNipe Pod

    I purchased one of these and while not as handy as a Harris Bipod, it is much much lighter (only 6 0z). It snaps easily and quickly to the rifle using its adapter which attaches to the guns standard sling attachment. Runs about $100.

  12. #12
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Bethel, Cantwell, Fort Yukon, Skagway, Chevak and Point Hope
    Posts
    967

    Default

    People need to learn how too use slings for shooting. Buy a 1" sling and practice using it. Afterall you will be taking a sling on the hunt so why pack the extra weight of a Bipod.

  13. #13
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    616

    Default treking poles

    Put the strap of each pole over the top opf the opposite pole then cross them. Put rifle on the crossed straps.Makes a rock solid rest. Better than I can do with a sling despite decades of practice.
    Dave

  14. #14
    Member shphtr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    1,375

    Default Snipe Pod

    I carried one for years but never used it and finally retired it. As a sheep hunter I never found myself at a loss for rocks for a rest.

  15. #15
    Member FALCON's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Enumclaw, Wa
    Posts
    176

    Default Thanks

    Guys,

    Thanks for all the advice. Since every once counts, I will pratice shooting off my pack, plus my rifle wouldn'y probally fit in my Eberlee pack with a bipod on it.

  16. #16
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    143

    Default Eberlestock pack

    Well that would have solved the issue long ago. I tried to put a bipod and rifle into the scabbard of my J104 pack and it will not fit. End of idea.
    The crossed trekking pole post is a good one. Same for Allen ref. learning to use a sling.

  17. #17
    Member FALCON's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Enumclaw, Wa
    Posts
    176

    Default Pack

    Bizy:

    How has the pack worked for you? I bought mine a year ago, but have only used it for day hunts?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •