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Thread: who has the Garmin 76 CSX??

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    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Question who has the Garmin 76 CSX??

    I know a few of you carry these units. I have been looking at this model for a long time. I recently came across a deal on one and I have a few last questions before biting. It is a huge unit...do you have reservations about the weight? They claim to have great reception ans ability to hold the sats (the main reason I am so enthused about this particular model)...can you attest to this in your experience? Lots to power there...what is your experience with battery life?

    Thank You!
    -Buck

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    I have one and LOVE it! The size isn't really a problem IMO. It's waterproof and FLOATS!, large color screen, big buttons, etc... What is not to like? It takes 2 AAs and will easily run all day on a set. Reception is awesome. I stuff it in an inside pocket and it never loses a track. You can't go wrong. I got mine for $353 delivered on eBay and they are even cheaper now (Cabela's still wants $499).
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    New member AKDSLDOG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKmud View Post
    I have one and LOVE it! The size isn't really a problem IMO. It's waterproof and FLOATS!, large color screen, big buttons, etc... What is not to like? It takes 2 AAs and will easily run all day on a set. Reception is awesome. I stuff it in an inside pocket and it never loses a track. You can't go wrong. I got mine for $353 delivered on eBay and they are even cheaper now (Cabela's still wants $499).
    Ditto on what mud said. I have the 76CS and paid $550.00 when it first came out, but GPS'S are a dime a dozen and they come out with newer/better ones every day ... I like my 76cs, I can read it on the run while snowmachineing or 4x4ing in it's holder on the handlebars. I have gotten up to 48hrs of continuous use on 2 AA batt's. The 76csx will suite you well, shop EBAY, better deals.

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    Member bgreen's Avatar
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    I have the 76CX and love it for all the reasons above. If I was strictly a hiker I would be looking for something smaller but I use it for hiking and motorized use so the large size isn't a problem for me.

    The antennae IS awesome.

    The GPSmap 60 CX (or CSX) has a smaller case but has buttons on the bottom for ease of use in hand.

    The GPSmap 76 CX (or CSX) has a larger case but has buttons on the top for ease of use while mounted.

    They are the same gps but have different cases for different uses.
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    Member rlcofmn's Avatar
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    Default I love mine

    The sixe has not bothered me at all. I use it alot on moterized stuff but i have also hiked alot with it and it has always fit in my pocket just fine. It never looses signal and i think the battarys last amaizingly long. I dont leave the road without it.

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    New member redmtn's Avatar
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    I have one also and can get a satellite lock even in my basement.I picked up a 2 gb chip and downloaded all the topographical maps for Canada on it.I would also recommend a ram mount for your windshield and a charger that works on your cigarette lighter to save your batteries.

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    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Thumbs up This is great news!

    So the 60 and the 76 are the same internal unit? Is the only reason you all went with the 76 for the buttons at the top?

    Glad to confirm the sat lock is as promised. I will use more for hiking initially, but would likely become dual purpose soon enough.

    Thanks for the replies!

    btw...$250 on CL...not in AK

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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    The 60 and the 76 aren't the same internally. I don't have the functions list in front of me, but there are some functions that the 76 sports that the 60 doesn't. I know the 76 has an altimeter (not on the 60), I don't think the 60 floats either.

    The "x" series Garmins have the new chip that REALLY helps reception. So any models that end with "x" will have the upgrade.
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    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Default Thanks!

    I like the "floating" capability and, although I've never used one, I think an altimeter would be a great benefit.

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    Member bgreen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKmud View Post
    The 60 and the 76 aren't the same internally. I don't have the functions list in front of me, but there are some functions that the 76 sports that the 60 doesn't. I know the 76 has an altimeter (not on the 60), I don't think the 60 floats either.

    The "x" series Garmins have the new chip that REALLY helps reception. So any models that end with "x" will have the upgrade.
    Huh, I guess thats what I get for listening to the salesman. I thought the x series had an altimeter and a magnetic compass that the non x didn't have, and that it had nothing to do with the antennae. I don't see much use for an altimeter since your gps will tell you elevation based on your position relative to the satellites, am I missing something?
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    Member bgreen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bgreen View Post
    Huh, I guess thats what I get for listening to the salesman. I thought the x series had an altimeter and a magnetic compass that the non x didn't have, and that it had nothing to do with the antennae. I don't see much use for an altimeter since your gps will tell you elevation based on your position relative to the satellites, am I missing something?
    Okay, your spot on about the "X", for some reason I was thinking mine was a CS not a CX.

    Looks like the 60 is .2 oz lighter, .3" narrower, .1" shorter, and .1" thicker. Not much of a size or weight savings. It doesn't float, and it comes with a smaller micro SD card. (64mb vs 128mb) But it does come with a belt clip.

    https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=145&pID=310
    https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=145&pID=351
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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    I believe the altimeter is an actual barometric instrument and doesn't simply rely on the GPS coordinates. I know the GPS oriented elevations are rarely very accurate (+/- several hundred feet most of the time). Not that elevation/altitude is all that important most of the time, but it can be handy information especially if you use it as a backup in the airplane.
    AKmud
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    Member bgreen's Avatar
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    I remember the older GPS units being really inaccurate on the elevation but at least with my 76CX the elevation seems to be really accurate. "Seems" to be.

    The website was mentioning the altimeter being used for tracking weather patterns which might actually be a pretty useful tool in the back country. Its only a few bucks more and just having the electronic compass probably makes it worth the cost. (I would like to be able to take a bearing without having to move)
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    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKmud View Post
    I believe the altimeter is an actual barometric instrument and doesn't simply rely on the GPS coordinates. I know the GPS oriented elevations are rarely very accurate (+/- several hundred feet most of the time). Not that elevation/altitude is all that important most of the time, but it can be handy information especially if you use it as a backup in the airplane.
    I think you are on to something here. I remember asking a question this time last year regarding the difference btw a barometric and electronic altitude reading. Barometric is much more accurate. And the Compass reading without moving is another big plus!

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I have ordered the new Magellan Triton 2000. It has a ton of features and uses the National Geo topo 1 in 24,000 maps. Full color and a touch screen amongst a bunch of other features some of them realy cool and some that I don't think I will ever use. The bad is that it is $500! If it is as good as it is supposed to be the Garmins should be falling in price. I believe that the impending release of the triton is the cause for the $50 rebate on the Garmins. I sure hope it lives up to its hype as a user friendly "intuitive" platform.

  16. #16
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Default Garmin model codes

    There seems to be a little confusion on the Garmin models.

    "C" designates a color display
    "S" designates internal sensors for barometer and compass
    "X" designates the newer high-sensitivity GPS

    The 60 and 76 series are basically the same internal unit in different packages. The 76 is geared toward water, so it floats and has a larger screen. The 60 is geared toward hiking, so it does not float and has a little smaller screen with a larger antenna. The software is pretty much the same, but the 76 will accept larger data cards, giving you more memory space. Neither "X" unit has internal map memory anymore, though older versions of these models used to have plenty of internal memory and the black&white (non-X) versions still do. The newer ones use data cards for the maps.

    Note on the Sensor models. The electronic compass works very well and is pretty accurate as long as you follow the calibration instructions exactly and hold the unit perfectly level when taking a compass measurement. Holding the unit upright, like you would normally read the display will give you inaccurate electronic compass readings, even more so in Alaska where the magnetic field declination angle is much higher than down in America. Also, if you do the calibration proceedure while holding the unit at waist level near your metal belt buckle, the calibration will not be accurate. You must be aware of any ferous metals in the area where you perform the calibration as well as take the heading readings... just like with a standard magnetic compass.

    The barometer works as an accurate alitimeter only when you know the current atmospheric pressure. It works the same as a plane's altimeter in that you enter your current barometric pressure and it will give you your altitude. When traveling over long distances and time, you will not get very accurate altitude readings if you don't keep up with the atmospheric pressure. There are a couple calibration modes and one of them is an autocalibration that uses the GPS figured altitude to calibrate the barometer over a long period of time. You also have to pick whether the unit gives you altitude via barometer or GPS.

    I have used the barometer quite a bit and when travelling over land by vehicle you get a pretty interesting altitude change graph that has novelty use. I've also tracked a couple thousand miles of commercial airline flight and found that the barometric pressure messes up the altitude of your track. The plane goes up, but the altitude stops climbing at 5,000 feet (because the plane is pressurized), so if you wanted the real altitude readings, you would have to shut off the pressure sensor and go with the less accurate GPS altitude.
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    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Great Information!

    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    The barometer works as an accurate alitimeter only when you know the current atmospheric pressure. It works the same as a plane's altimeter in that you enter your current barometric pressure and it will give you your altitude.
    Thanks for your input Joat! Now, how does one know the exact barometric pressure when afield? Is there a device that I can get this reading while in the field?

    Thank You!

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    If you are near an airport you can get the current barometric reading the same as pilots do or by tuning in to the weather band and finding out the pressure at the local marine weather station. If you are in the middle of the woods somewhere, you are pretty much out of luck on that. However, if you have a map, and can figure your exact altitude based on the topo lines, you can enter your current altitude when calibrating the barometer. It gives you the option of entering either your current altitude or the current barometric pressure or using the autocalibration feature that guesses based on the GPS altitude.

    Alternatively, if you are doing a multi-day trek across land you can start by calibrating to the local barometric pressure reading when you depart. When you get to a location where you will be stopping for a few hours or overnight, note your altitude reading (write it down). Now, when you are ready to move again, you can calibrate the sensor to the current altitude if the barometric pressure had changed while you were camped.
    Winter is Coming...

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    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Angry bummed on my so called "deal"

    Finally got ahold of the guy today, his wife actually, and guess what? ...he's not selling it anymore because they moved to the big city and she needs it to get around or get home if lost or something arrrg... Thanks for the input, I will keep looking for deal

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