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Thread: Beach Anchoring System

  1. #1

    Default Beach Anchoring System

    Anyone have any experience with an effective home made beach anchoring system? I live in Juneau, and most beaches around here are pretty rocky, so I'm looking for a system that allows me to anchor my skiff (16ft North River) out in the water while I'm camping on land. Awhile back, I saw that someone had posted info on a pully-type system, but I had difficulty with that.

    My biggest worry is waking up in the morning, and seeing that my boat has drifted away! So...any suggestions on that would be great too (i.e.-extra security to ensure my boat is there when I get back!).

    This is something that I would like to build during the winter, so I can have it up and running when summer hits. Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Default

    What didnt work about the Pulley System? Where did you have your problems.

  3. #3

    Wink Pulley System

    I've used a pulley system before but now I just use a zodiac. Either way the one thing that I strongly believe in is if I'm going to anchor off and be out of sight of my boat (either over the hill hunting or asleep in a cabin/tent) I definately want to have two anchors down with 7:1 and a shore line. All three should be tied off of the bow. After living in Dutch Harbor for five years and boating in PWS for the last two years, I've learned that you can really never be too careful. The only exception is if I'm anchored off in a very protected cove-such as Harrision Lagoon and then I just drop the two hooks. Being able to set an anchor is obviously a very critical skill. I must admit that even with two anchors and a shore line I still don't like to be out of sight of my boat and I always am happy to crest the hill and see my boat still anchored where I left her.

    Good luck and if you have any specific questions on the pulley system I used let me know.
    Ruby at the end of a good day.

  4. #4

    Default Pully System

    TriIron - Thanks for the information. I'm very interested in what you did for your pully system. How do you use two anchors on your bow, and still be able to pull it in like a pully system?

    The problem I've had this summer is setting it in the right spot, to correlate with the rising and setting tides. Since I'm still new to boating, I'm aways unsure of how far out to put the anchor, and with how much additional roe. Most of the time, it seems as though I don't put it far enough out. If I put it much further, I'm worrying that someone will run over my shore lines.

  5. #5

    Default

    TriIron - Also, what types of anchors to you use, which grab the best for this situation?

  6. #6
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    I too am very new to boating & have wondered about this situation myself.
    I think I can picture a pulley system that would work, but would like to hear how it's done.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  7. #7
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default Anchor Buddy

    I have used the anchor buddy for a couple years while boating PWS. This system has worked well. It is a bunge that you hook to your anchor. Drop it in deep water. Back up to the shore, attach a rope to pull it back to you and let the bunge pull your boat back into deep water. Make sure to leave enough rope for the boat to keep its nose into the wind while on anchor.

    http://www.overtons.com/modperl/prod...=33367&aID=25D

    Steve

  8. #8

    Default Answers?

    As far as the type of anchors-that really depends on what type of bottom you are anchoring in. I'm always anchoring into mud or silts so I use two "Bruce" otherwise know as claw anchors. The size depend on the type and size of your boat. I basically take what is recommended for my boat and use two anchors instead of one. There is a lot of information on how to set an anchor but it's really just a matter of practicing. You and your first mate should be able to do it blindfolded with out being able to hear each other since you just may have to do it in the dark and with the wind howling... As far as how you use two anchors off the bow with a pully system. It's just the same as a single system, I just add a bouy to the two anchors and conect my pully to the bouy. I've found that setting the anchors at 45 degrees from each other is about right. It worked for me but I'm sure there are lots of other ways of skinning that cat.
    Ruby at the end of a good day.

  9. #9

    Default "remote anchoring"

    I've used this system with good success so far (23' aluminum river boat). I've been lucky enough to not get caught in any storms though. I've talked with Neil thorugh e-mail a couple of times and he seems really nice. It says something that he's good enough to share with us.

    www.neilmoomey.com/howtos/anchor_buoy/

  10. #10
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    This guy has it figured out: http://www.neilmoomey.com/howtos/anchor_buoy/

    I have never used this system, but it looks promising.
    Before I bought a tender I would cleat off a predetermined length of rode and pile it on the bow. I would then tie a second line to bottom of the anchor and from shore, push the boat out to the predetermined depth and pull the anchor off the bow. I would then tie the line attached to the bottom of the anchor to a tree on shore. I would only do this in protected anchorages because I could not set the anchor. When I wanted to get the boat I would pull the anchor in. I always wondered what would happen if the anchor lodged in between a couple of rocks. Never happened, but it would result in a chilly swim.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  11. #11
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    beat me to the punch, Eggy!
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  12. #12
    Member Cliffhanger's Avatar
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    Default Anchoring remotely

    When I'm clamming on the Seldovia side of Kachemak Bay I use the "trip the anchor off the bow" trick after pushing the boat out with a retrieving line through the anchor flukes. That works for short trips to the beach, but if the wind comes up and I'm having coffee at a neighbors, I'm watching and worrying about my boat constantly.

    I was going to try the Anchor Buddy bungie but my reading on it says that it stretches out only 50 feet. In Kachemak or PWS that's just not going to keep your boat floating between tides.

    So, I followed Neil Mooney's instructions and used his pully system with success the first time I went out into PWS reconnoitering for deer. Basically you get you anchor out there where the boat won't go dry, set it, then run your running line-type setup through the pipe pulley to the beach. Worked great and I felt pretty secure being out of sight of the boat overnight. I was able to run the boat almost 150 feet offshore.

  13. #13
    Member ACBMAN's Avatar
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    Default Anchoring with buddy

    Back in the cheap boating days when I had my 16' Naiad inflatable I used 2 anchor buddies so I could be 100' off shore,First I would go to shore with a rope that had 100' marks on it,go out to 100'(be sure the waters not to deep) and hook the shore line to the stern,drop the anchor with the 2 anchor buddies hooked to the bow and pull myself back to shore,unload gear and let the boat back out. Pulling the boat in would set the anchor or you may have to try again.

  14. #14

    Default

    Thanks for the tips, everyone! In Monney's plans, he suggests using floating poly rope. For those of you who have used Mooney's system, when you place the boat 150' or so out, have you had anyone run over the ropes that go to shore? Some of the coves that I will be anchoring in are pretty small, but can get very busy, so I'm just currious if this has happened to you. I suppose some people could get pretty angry if they did this.

    Other than that, I think I'll give this a try this summer. But, I'll probably use two anchors just to make sure the boat doesn't go anywhere!

  15. #15
    Member Cliffhanger's Avatar
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    Default Running over line

    I haven't had that happen, but it is definitely a concern. The yellow line I bought (best deal I found was at AIH) can at least be seen on the surface. I don't think a sinking line would work on this setup.

  16. #16

    Default

    for your size boat, the anchor buddy system would be ideal. It doesn't work on large tidal flats, as already mentioned (and who wants to anchor there, as that creates lots of issues), but works great in any area where there's a reasonable drop off.

    Here's two pictures of my boat at the same spot, tied off with an Anchor Buddy at low and high tides...





    Anchor Buddy on a pretty flat/shallow beach (anchor buddy is attached to the port side stern cleat, out of view)...



    ...in that one above, I would have had to reset it to make it thru a full tide swing. But, rather than doing that, I would simply move farther down the beach, towards the rocks, and it drops off nicely and I could anchor there overnight with no problems.

    Concerning floating line!!!... Always use floating line! Otherwise the line may get wrapped up on a rock (and it takes surprising little to snag a line for good) under the water and you'll have to swim out to your skiff. Don't ask my how I learned that tidbit. It's kinda embarrassing.

  17. #17

    Default Yellow rope & bouy

    I use yellow floating rope. I also leave the system set up the whole time I'm out so all I have to do is hook up to the bow eye. I leave a large yellow bouy at the end to draw attention to it hoping nobody will run over it. You can see the rope from quite aways out, so hopefully everyone is paying attention.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  18. #18

    Default I have'nt got a better way but...

    It looks like you are blocking off half the bay and preventing everyone else from using it. It must be an illusion.
    I got tangled in a partially submerged line this past summer. It makes for an unhappy boater. The floating high visability yellow line is a good idea if one must anchor that way.

  19. #19

    Default Goretex Dry-Suit & Shore Lines (if you don't have an inflatable or dinghy)

    The amount of specialized gear needed to deal with all the various situations is a bit overwhelming, heavy, expensive & space consuming.

    For overnight lake anchoring my system is

    (1) set the anchor off the bow with the bow pointed away from shore
    (2) back the boat in reverse towards shore to get adequate scope on the anchor line
    (3) tie a shore line to each stern corner
    (3) tilt the engine up & jump overboard with my chest waders on
    (4) wade to shore and pull the boat against the set anchor
    (5) tie off the shore lines at about a 30 degree angle away from the boat
    (6) to retreive the boat I just untie the shorelines then wade out and get it.

    This works great in lakes. Boat goes up and down, stays put, and stays pointed into the waves. I have done it on Skilak Lake, Kenai Lake, Cooper Lake, & Tustemena Lake with a 20' boat. The worst that happens is the boat could come off anchor and washup on shore (although it has not yet happened to me!) I did however suck a shore line into the jet foot once when not paying attention...........

    I have considered (but not tried) doing the same thing in the ocean, except that I would wear my goretex dry suit and life preserver because you have to go so much farther from shore and into deep water to compensate for the tides. The only extra gear needed for this system is 2 shore lines, a dry suit, and the ability to swim 150 feet.

    You could also use one of the shore lines to pull yourself back to the boat for retreival instead of swimming. If you had a long enough shore line you could tie it off to land earlier in the sequence and even pull yourself to shore when you leave the boat.

    If you carry an inflatable, then that seems like the simplest overall solution to me (assuming you don't pop it).

    Any thoughts on this one?

  20. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by titobandito View Post
    If you carry an inflatable, then that seems like the simplest overall solution to me (assuming you don't pop it).

    Any thoughts on this one?
    Just that the whole point of the above systems is to avoid the inflatable, and getting wet. Otherwise, your plan sound good.

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