Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 32

Thread: 4 Person track vehicle

  1. #1

    Default 4 Person track vehicle

    This year we tried a couple atv's with AD Bovin tracks during moose and caribou season on the Seward Pennisula. Have to go over granite (crushed and boulders), lots of frozen tundra no snow, 2 feet of snow, rivers (open and frozen).

    I was not impressed with this brand of tracks. Much cheaper than say Mattracks and much less capable. They cant handle the contour changes, too rigid. Some of the riders not very atv savvy either. Broke the tracks and a arms and drive shafts.

    I have some experience with argos on wheels, but only in water, mud, and relatively smooth ground.

    My questions are:
    1. For those running argos, do they have much suspension? I mean, can you travel over ruff stuff without getting bounced out or breaking the machine?
    2. Does anyone make a small, 2-4 person (or 2 plus cargo), tracked vehicle that has suspension travel similar to todays atv's that can handle all seasons all terrains?
    3. I am contemplating building a couple small rigs for next year based off of atv components and two 6-8 foot long tracks. Any suggestions as to build imput or personal preferences? Any interest in purchasing such a rig if one was available? How much would you spend on such a rig?

  2. #2
    Member Roger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sunshine Alaska
    Posts
    2,050

    Default

    They make a 2 man argo , But I'm here to tell Argos have NO SUSPENSION !!!! But they go over just about anything.I have been thru some NASTY stuff and never had a problem with things breaking I have had 6 Adults in ther no problem,Unless you do stuff like this ...........
    Attached Images Attached Images
    PEOPLE SAY I HAVE A.D.D I DON'T UNDERSTA.....OH LOOK A MOOSE !!!

  3. #3
    Member Roger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sunshine Alaska
    Posts
    2,050

    Default

    If you are doing 6-8 foot tracks sounds like an argo anyway....Minus the suspension, You might want to look in to a C.O.O.T
    Attached Images Attached Images
    PEOPLE SAY I HAVE A.D.D I DON'T UNDERSTA.....OH LOOK A MOOSE !!!

  4. #4
    New member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Goosepilot,
    You might want to consider a MaxII (2-person) or MaxIV (4-person). They are similar to Argos, but in my opinion much simpler and more reliable. Like the Argo, they do not have a suspension, but their length and width really help to smooth out the ride. Tracks are an option but I don't have any experience with them. I own a MaxII, but if I had it to do over again I'd get the MaxIV. It's footprint isn't much bigger then the II, but the extra interior space would come in handy. And it's way easier to work on should the need arise. You can check them out at http://www.maxatvs.com and take one for a test drive by contacting Mark at http://www.2dMaxAlaska.com. I've had mine for about 7 years and I'm sold on them, they are a blast to drive...

  5. #5
    Member jkb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    1,466

    Default tracks and rocks don't mix

    anything on tracks does not fare well in rocks and rough terrian. If you or someone was able to build somthing on tracks that didn't break in the rocks the world would beat a path to your door. I would love to see a prototype or plans as a potential investor (or a least a test pilot). Because at this time there are no machines that can do it all.

  6. #6

    Default

    In my opinion, most of these rigs like argo's, were designed to traverse relatively "smooth" ground and water, not severly choppy ground, boulder fields or any situations that require flex, articulation, or the ability to soak up bumps at speeds over a 2-5 mph.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm not hacking these units, I just don't think they are the kind of rig that will do or hold up to my situation.

    I ended up fixing my atv's every other day because the Bovin tracks were too rigid and unable to flex or climb over any obstacle over 6" vertical. They just put too much stress on the a arms, ball joints, or bolts attaching the arm to the wheel hub(spindle).

    Ironically, I ended up buying a set of tires/rims for the polaris and was surprised at how much terrain/snow it handled. It ultimately ended up pulling the yahmaha on tracks back to camp after it broke 3 of the four cv units on the wheel side of the drive shaft.

    As long as you could keep the lugs on solid ground and the snow wasn't crusted it kept chugging along at 2-5 mph. The down side was that 30 miles a day on wheels felt like a 10 hour bronc riding session. You went up and down or around every bump. The Bovin tracks were too rigid, but did give great traction, even some flotation in the snow if it was deep enough to cover all bumps so you could get some speed up. On rough ground the tracks allowed you to skip over half the bumps at 2-5, but would stop you or rip off an a arm if you went over 5 or hit a bump over 6" that wasn't rounded off.

    I have custom built several rock crawling jeeps and mountain climbing snowmobiles. These are rigs built to go to the extremes soley in their respective situations and are by no means able to handle even a mild combination of both situations.

    I think an atv and say Mattracks would do alot better. Unfortunately, it's only good for one person and cargo or two people w/ very limited cargo and the tracks should be one long, continuous as opposed to two sets of shorter tracks. Tires go flat and tracks over tires tend to be hard on tire side walls. Atv's even in low range are hard to keep going slow enough in some situations.

    My uncle makes and sells a solid rubber wheel for atvs that eliminates the flat tire. It was designed to cut a narrow trench in fields to drain water, but is being used by some atv guys that do mud drags or ride in sharp rocky areas where cuts or punctures are the main problem.

    I have some connections with a few Arctic Cat and Polaris factory guys and I have a few ideas on what and how I would build such a rig. If there is a demand to build a handful, I could really justify the start up costs alot better or with the right partner, who knows?

  7. #7
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    3,185

    Thumbs up Here ya go.....

    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  8. #8

    Default

    Looks nice. Good chunk of change tied up as well in a one man rig. Tell us about it's pro's and con's.

  9. #9
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    3,185

    Default

    I don't know anything about it. It was one of Mattracks test vehicles (I stole the pic from their website).

    I contacted Mattracks about putting their tracks on just the front of my 6x6 and the regular Polaris tracks on the rear, but they said the gearing was about 30% lower and they wouldn't sync up. I suppose with some sprocket magic you could get the gearing correct though.
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  10. #10
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,670

    Default

    Why not just buy a used Haglunds SUSV? They carry four people, float, are fully enclosed, have a decent suspension, and do good on just about every terrain out there.

  11. #11

    Default I might just be tired

    but I can't recall a Haglands anything?
    Got a pic or a link?
    Mike
    Mike
    www.alaskaatvclub.org
    There is a faster way off the mountain, might hurt a little though.

  12. #12
    Member mod elan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Glennallen
    Posts
    1,476

    Default

    A Haaglund is the military double ender. This is the only picture I could find doing a quick web search. Maybe bronco can tell us what the SUSV means. I forget.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13
    Member mod elan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Glennallen
    Posts
    1,476

    Default

    Here is another version for the six wheeler.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #14
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,670

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mod elan View Post
    A Haaglund is the military double ender. This is the only picture I could find doing a quick web search. Maybe bronco can tell us what the SUSV means. I forget.

    SUSV= small unit support vehicle if I remember correctly.

    Mod Elan I think your Ranger needs a set of tracks like those you just posted!

  15. #15

    Default

    I too searched and found pics of both of the polaris 6x6 with tracks. I forget the brand of the one with the larger track over both rear drives, but it is a less expensive, snomobile rail based (too rigid) similar to AD Bovin. It would not have any less problems than what I experienced with my 4x4's. Total price for a 6x6 and those tracks???

    I like the Mattracks better because they incorporate some suspension in the track itself. The track can somewhat conform the ground you go over and they seem to have better aproach angles built into the track so that it will climb over a larger vertical object rather than just bump into it and stop, bounce over, or tear off the arms. Definitely more capable than other snomobile based systems, but also cost more (guessing the six tracks will cost close to 7-8K). 6x6 would get you 2 people and about the same cargo as w/ one on a 4x4. Anyone have experience w/ Mattrack 6x6? I think it will still break the wheeler arms and driveline, just not as much as the more rigid systems.

    The Haglund looks beefy. Anyone have experience here? Cost? Maintenance? Looks interesting, but probably larger than I'm after and too expensive. I will look into them a little more though.

    Still leaning towards building my own. A little wider than a 4x4 atv and significantly smaller and lighter than the Haglund. Thinking it will be a forward single pilot, 2 side by side removeable or folding suspension seats, and cargo behind. Running on two 8-12" wide x 6-8' long tracks driven by a 2 clutch system. The track running gear having 2 dual walking tandems independently suspended with 6-10" of travel. This would have front and rear approach angles for both forward and reverse climbing situations. Independent running gear would allow a smoother ride expecially at higher speeds (above 5-10 mph) than a atv based track rig because of the suspension travel, approach angles and single longer track. It would also be smoother than the larger rigid or torsion style tracks on a Haglund or argo because of the independent walking tandems ability to conform to the ground rather than ride up, over center, and crash down the other side like a bull dozer.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Eagel River, AK
    Posts
    27

    Thumbs up

    As anyone seen the ASV. Yes they are a tracked skid-loader but the new Scout 50 look promising! Very little ground pressure! Here is picture of one with cab and dump box. Trying to load picture mot sure if took! Here is web site http://asvi.com/scout_main.cfm
    Attached Images Attached Images

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    579

    Default

    The SUSV(Haglund) are very expensive and maint. cost are crazy. It has a Mercedes engine and tranny. I have worked on hundreds of them.

  18. #18
    Member mod elan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Glennallen
    Posts
    1,476

    Default

    450HUNTER- I take it you're a mechanic in the military? Are the problems self inflicted by the operators? The handful of guys I know using them for hunting really like them. I've only heard of one time where something happened to the center link that disabled it causing the guy to walk out. What problems are you seeing?

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    579

    Default

    I'm not in the army anymore but I am still DOD and yes I still work on them. I see alot of engine and tranny problems along with electric. If your freinds ever have to do any engine work I hope they have deep pockets. Parts are very very expensive and hard to find sometime. When they are running good they are awesome machines.

  20. #20

    Default

    I kinda figured purchase and maintenance would be the down sides to that kind of rig.

    As for a purchased rig, I am thinking of trying either an argo or a ranger 6x6 with Mattracks.

    Right now I still favor building my own.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •