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Thread: Teacher in need of help

  1. #1
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    Default Teacher in need of help

    Hello all,

    Ok here is my issue and I hope you don't mind me asking it in the hunting forum.

    My brother and I booked a float hunt for sept 08. I am a teacher and getting time off during September is impossible but there was a good shot at getting the time. However, I was denied my first request for the time. I mentioned the great possiblities I can bring back to the school with my experiences in Alaska. I am a PE and Health teacher. The importance of Nutrition, fitness and the environment is what I mentioned. I can teach a unit in health with first hand experience about the environment and our impact plus I can run an outdoors club for the students.

    I would like help or information on putting together an educational unit on the importance of preserving our environment and wilderness areas. Unfortunated i live in Connecticut and the local pressures would not appreciate the hunting aspect of our trip. Thank you for your time and help.

  2. #2
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Low-impact hunt!

    Maybe you could focus the unit on low-impact ways to enjoy the wilderness? Float hunting is a low impact method, if certain practices are followed. Here are some things I recommend:

    1. Deposit human waste at least 200 yards from the river.

    2. Avoid latrine pits; concentrated waste can pollute the water table. Dig cat holes instead.

    3. Don't cut trees down. Break limbs for firewood instead (most folks like to feel they are the first ones there, and cut-off stumps erode that experience).

    4. Do minimal site preparation for the footprint of your tent. Instead of digging a trench around the tent, cutting down tussocks and brush, choose a well-drained gravel bar campsite.

    5. Build campfires on a gravel bar not far from the river. High water will scour the evidence, restoring the area to its pristine state.

    6. Repack your food to minimize the trash buildup in the field and haul out everything you bring with you.

    7. The environmental benefits of procuring of naturally-grown meat for food versus the environmental costs of pen-raised meat.

    Have a look at the BLM's "Leave No Trace" website for other ideas.

    You should be able to do all of this without talking about the hunt at all, if you have to. Some folks may be put off by the fact that this is a hunt, and although there are places to battle this issue, I doubt that you want to do that with the folks who are deciding whether you can have the time off or not.

    Hope it helps!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
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    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
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  3. #3

    Default

    Check with your state's hunter ed program, whether that's managed by F&G or DNR. They have full curricula adapted for your state, as well as access to those from other states. Lots of materials there, right down to learning objectives and test questions. You shouldn't have much trouble adapting those materials to justify your trip. Heck, you might even be inspired to become a hunter safety instructor and bring the whole program into your school. It's not that far-fetched, and is in fact frequently done in small towns all over the country.

  4. #4
    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Default

    If you are a PE teacher you could also show photos and video of how physicaly demanding the Alaskan wilderness can be. It makes a great visual aid to childern why they need to be in shape. Whether they want to come and view the wildlife or hunt the wildlife it is a lot of physical exertion. Hope this helps.

  5. #5
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Are you familiar with the Project Wild curriculum? There are some great lessons provided through this program, and all of them focus on responsible use of wild lands and natural resources.

    I've got a few other resources that I use in my Biology classes. I'd be happy to send them to you and you could adapt them as you see fit. They're more science-based, but maybe they'd give you some ideas.

  6. #6

    Default San Franciso

    Sorry I had 2--maybe moving to a more conservative part of the country that would be more open to hunting would work. Maybe San Francisco. Man I feel bad but I thought it was funny...

  7. #7

    Default just my thoughts

    I used to be a teacher, unless you are locked into Sept to hunt, then you should be able to hunt the beginning of Caribou season, Aug 10 if I am not mistaken, see if you can get ahold of a hunter education booklet for alaska as well.

    Good Luck

  8. #8
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    Default Project wild

    Brian is right, project wild is a good one and alot of thelessons in the project wild book uses alot of physical activity, give it a look over, I might even have an extra copy, I will check.

  9. #9
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    Talking Another Option

    Mabe you could jump on the global warming band wagon and I guarantee you would get everyones attetion.

  10. #10
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    Default

    Great Ideas so far. i have been beating the hallways talking to other teachers who have gone to other places during school and have tied it into the education of the students. I will look into the project wild curriculum. I would also be very interested in your biology lessons. Our school's science classes are into the human impact on the watershed and also the river ecology. I am planning on jumping on the wilderness concervation bandwagon and the discovery planet earth craze for a presentation for the entire school. I have a lot of work pulling all this great information together to re-present this my proposal to the Principal. i also think i will be able to propose a club for the kids with the NO trace Left behind ideals. Please continue to throw out any more ideas or send me a pm with more information. Your help is greatly appreciated.

  11. #11
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default One way...

    Might want to look into this for your kids (if they are high school age), Im a good friend of the director. PM me for some more info.

    http://www.uaf.edu/outreach/clearing...se.html?id=731

    They don't do much with hunting, but natural resources is a big theme.

  12. #12

    Wink PE teacher:

    Youíre screwed! I am also a teacher and if I was your administrator I would have e tough time giving you the time off. Most teaching contracts read how much time off you can get and most contracts allow between 3-5 personal days off period. This is why I live in unit 23, I can hop on my sno-go or into my boat and I am there.

    I know this does not help you a bit but itís the nature of the beast of being a public school teacher. Good luck man. By the way we need teachers in the Arctic if your interested!



    Walt
    Northwest Alaska Back Country Rentals
    Your best bet in rafts, canoes and camp rentals
    Kotzebue, Alaska
    www.northwestalaska.com

  13. #13
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    Default Hit the Arctic

    If you have not paid or can get your money back a float trip in the arctic is great, caribou opens in July, But I like mid Aug, Fishing can be great, weather can be great and if your in the Bou, better yet. Might see some muskox, wolfs, brown bears and do some char or grayling fishing. Plus you keep your super happy. Good luck and enjoy Alaska.

    Terry

  14. #14
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Default Same here.

    I really never had the chance to plan an extended, dedicated moose hunt during September due to teaching responsibilities.
    The sheep season timing worked for me however, and I also managed to take some great early season caribou.

    Consider maybe a change in the species hunted.
    If you are dead set on moose, pm me about an early season Moose hunt option, Viszla.


    Frank

  15. #15

    Default leave without pay?

    Have you tried that? We can take 5 days of leave without pay if needed. If I was in a pickle and could afford it, I surely would do it. I guess I am lucky and have great 4 day weekend hunts! Once in awhile I can do the entire week off, but that is only if I save my personal days, which rarely happens as I use them for hunting one way or another.

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