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Thread: Squirrel taste?

  1. #1

    Default Squirrel taste?

    Pretty much only thing i can hunt for practice at this time, and a crispy squirrel with some seaonings looks pretty delicious. Does anyone know specifically if they taste good or not and how common diseas are currently?

  2. #2

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    They taste fine, but you need a slew of them for any kind of meal!!!!

  3. #3

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    They're great. We figure on two per person as a generous serving. But they're usually so tough that we stew them rather than frying.

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    Member AkCPO's Avatar
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    Default squirrel and dumplings

    Oh yeah... it doesn't get much better for a small game meal. Don't forget to add the head with the brains in too. Me and my granfather used to fight over who would get that part. Sometimes I even won.

  5. #5
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Good eating

    Yes they are great eating although the Eastern grays are a lot better. As everyone said, stew for a while or even a slight pressure cooking works great.

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    There great. I like them satue'd ( however you spell it) with butter and onions
    Life's journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting "HOLY **** WHAT A RIDE!!!"

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I've never tried our local red squirrels, but I've eaten ground squirrels before. Marinated overnight in teryaki sauce and mixed in with some ramen noodles and rice, it was pretty darn tasty!

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    Wink local squirrels

    We were hunting along McCarthy Road and didnt see anything. And all I had was canned food. So we shot a mess of red squirrels and ate them with tabasco. They were tough cooked straight up and the meat was sp****, but stewed or marinated to tenderize would be better. Ive caught more flack for eating those squirrels than anything. You would think a guy ate a rat or something...not me there
    I come home with an honestly earned feeling that something good has taken place. It makes no difference whether I got anything, it has to do with how the day was spent. Fred Bear

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    bunch of tree rat eaters! I have eaten them on ramen when out huntin lite just browned them in a little water and the ramen mix then added more water to boil the noodles can't realy tell you how it tastes but when you havn't had anything but regular ramen for a couple days it is FREAKIN AWESOME. Like I tell my wife the meat IS the meal! I don't shoot tree rats in any other situation but of the ones I have seen taken in september/october there have been several crawling with bugs. After it gets good and cold (now) though they are better.

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    Member AKRDGRUNNER's Avatar
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    Default when i first got here

    we went small game hunting (southern boys) found it took 28 of those lil things and half a rabbit to make a pot of chili to feed 4 lol

  11. #11

    Default tree rats

    When we were homesteading, my wife would send me out every couple months so she could make a squirrel fricasee. The flavor was reminiscent of spruce hen and a squirrel had less meat then one spruce hen breast. Tough little buggers. Considering that a .22 l.r. bullet to a squirrel is like a 50 cal bmg to a human, they were definitely tough. Loved the little red fleas, too. Always put the dead squirrels in a pan of cold spring water to kill them.

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    Member skydiver_99654's Avatar
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    Default True story

    In Ohio, the squirrels were quite a bit bigger,and BETTER eating than the squirrels up here. I used to go squirrel hunting every weekend as a teenager. Loved being out in the woods. A squirrel was the first animal I ever hunted and killed when I was 9 years old with my now deceased grandfather. Mom always made Squirrel Gravy and Biscuits. Yummmmmm......
    I remember one time I went out hunting with my stepdad for squirrel...I was about 10 years old. We separated in the woods, when I saw a HUGE squirrel up in a tree whistling at me.... BOOM!!! I shot that squirrel and was really proud. When my stepdad asked me how many squirrels I got when I met him back at the car...I told him just one. He looked at my vest which was dragging on the ground (behind me), and said "what did you do? Shoot a 20 pound squirrel?" I told him it was REALLY Big!. He took it out of my pouch and started to laugh uncontrollably. I asked him what was so funny... He told me that it was a Ground HOg ! ! ! Hahahahaha. Heck, it was up in a tree just whistling away at me ! To this day, my stepdad always tells people not to whistle in the woods when I'm around. Funny story looking back on it, but boy was I embarrassed. By the way..we cooked up the Hog and it was delicious !
    Johnny

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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by Fishwhacker View Post
    Pretty much only thing i can hunt for practice at this time, and a crispy squirrel with some seaonings looks pretty delicious. Does anyone know specifically if they taste good or not and how common diseas are currently?
    They are not bad, but tend to be dry,squirrel cacciatore is the way to go.
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

  14. #14
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Man if you can get a fox squirrel that is a meal in it's self..
    I like to eat them, but cleaning them was a pain.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  15. #15
    Member chrisWillh's Avatar
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    Default

    I haven't had any since I moved up here, but I used to love Oklahoma gray squirrel. I've often heard the little buggers up here taste like spruce nuts and generally aren't worth the effort, but if this many people love them I might just give them a try.
    Chris Willhoite

  16. #16

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    I have hunted them here in Ohio (Greys mostly) Nearly my entire life. They are pretty good but as has been mentioned it takes alot of them to make a meal here atleast. Most people cook them in a crock pot or a roaster oven for extended periods here as they are pretty tuff. Lots of recipes online... pot pies, fried squirrels (They generally parboil them I believe) and stews. as for the taste, they are pretty close to rabbit but not nearly as meaty. I will post a recipe or two if you want to try them out. I can also give you alot of pointers on skinning them out, I generally get it accomplished in 35 seconds or so and although it takes a little practice cleaning squirrels will become simple after just 4 or 5 (There is even a you tube video online walking you through the steps I use to clean them I believe)

  17. #17

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    I have noticed one difference in the local squirrels. I used to snare a bunch (yeah, there's a trick to that), and they were always stronger tasting than the ones I shot.

    Then I figured out that the ones I shot were bleeding out right away. Soaking the snared ones overnight in saltwater sorted out the difference, and now we soak all we get. Much milder and none of the "bite" in the taste of ones that haven't bled out. We use them in stews and in mushroom gravy over homegrown potatoes- boiled or mashed. Yum.

  18. #18

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    here is the method I use to clean them, just a little tip. If you dunk them in water first the hair won't stick to the meat nearly as bad if you happen to let it come in contact with the carcas while cleaning.

    http://s60.photobucket.com/albums/h2...elSkinning.flv

  19. #19
    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisWillh View Post
    .....I've often heard the little buggers up here taste like spruce nuts and generally aren't worth the effort, but if this many people love them I might just give them a try.
    I'm known to eat anything, and I'll pass on red squirrels (unless you kill, clean, and cook them up for me). They just aren't worth the bother, although they'd make fine survival fare after a week or so without food.

    I admit not having tried their larger cousins, the parka squirrels or arctic ground squirrels. I suppose I've gotta' try that next.

  20. #20
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Default

    I agree with mark on this the red squirrels up here aren't worth the effort. However our ground squirrels are almost as good as fox squirrels and definitely worth stewing. I don't go back to visit my Family in Michigan often but when I do I almost always fix a big pot of squirrel stew for me and my family. Good stuff!

    PS I do occasionally take a red squirrel there is a lot of decent fly tying material on one of those little guys. BTW brushed out cat and dog fir also makes great dubbing!

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