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Thread: Scope recommendations

  1. #1

    Default Scope recommendations

    If you were floating for moose with a Rem 7600 in 35 Whelen, what scope would you want on it? I'm a noob to float hunting and moose and that rifle but planning on all three next year. Thanks.

  2. #2

    Default Don't Overscope...

    I'd say maybe a 2-7x variable power, and leave it on 2x...if a long shot offers itself, you'll have time to crank the scope up tp 7x. Float hunting provides the chance to round a bend and be up close and personal with moose and/or bears, so the 2x will let you acquire your target quickly if you need to.

    Michael

  3. #3

    Default Agree!

    I like what MdHunter said.

    2-7x is a great all-around scope. Some will say 2.5-whatever or 1.5 to whatever. Any of those will work for you as long as you can shoot in a hurry up close and zoom out for a longer distance shot.


    As for brand, I would choose any of the top quality brands. They are all good. Some have more features on them than others. I like simple scopes without a lot of stuff to fool with. Some guys are gadget guys though.

    The more you spend does not kill them deader though. I've had guys show up carrying scopes worth more than I'd make on the hunt but couldn't hit the broadside of the barn. Then I've had guys show up with a beat-up rifle with just a plane jane "quality" scope and be able to out shoot any of the other hunters. Practice Practice Practice

    Silver vs. Black Is your rifle stainless or blued? Do you want matching pretty or the good deal? If you have a stainless rifle and can find a good deal on a silver scope great. If the good deal is only on the black scope, how much is pretty worth to you?

    Hope it gives some insight. Have a great float.

  4. #4
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    Default

    I also like what MdHunter said. The thing to consider when picking the brand is insure it has a good reputation for quality and its water and fog proof.

    If you haven't float hunted before, I would highly recommend Larry Bartlett's video Float Hunting Alaska Vol I.

  5. #5
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    Default

    I use a burris fullfield 1.75-5 on my 338 and love it. I limit myself to 200 yard shots (for several reasons) and this rig is all I need and it puts up with a thumpin. The high power stuff just isn't that practical or even needed for moose....considering that the kill zone is the size of a 55 gallon drum.

  6. #6
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    Thumbs up New B 2 All 3

    Couple points of interest:

    Float hunts in the first weeks of Sept. can give you quite a variance in the weather (wet maybe freezing) and on the water levels (lower, yet can 4-sure still spike with flooding)... obviously... depending on where ya go & the rivers you'll be running.

    Lots of different game plans, concepts, and equipment out there... the aim here is to pick a suitable river trip based on your goals, aquired info., skill levels, fittness levels, pocketbook, etc. and then getting ahold of or renting the best gear possible.

    Float trips can "test" you and gear... particularly for fist timers!

    Moving on to your inquiry on a Remington 7600 in .35 Whelen and scopping it out for your Alaska Moose float hunt:

    I'm just guessing you may have recently (w/in the past few years) purchased a new special production model 7600 in .35 Whelen. If that's the case - then you have a traditional looking Blued/Walnut rifle w/ factory iron sights. Nice rifle! That said, you essentialy have a good close-in to mid-ranging gun that is dependable, packs pretty reasonable punch, not too harsh on recoil or wallet, with fast repeatability for follow-ups.

    Here is what I'd do if it were mine -

    1.) Keep it simple... not too many add-ons! I'd make sure I have a few extra loaded Magazines.

    2.) Be absolutely certain you bring along the essentials to keep your gun and scope combo looking attractive & in perfect working order... You will want to keep up on this! Effects like some waterproof bag or case, a little tape, mitten, or baloon for over the muzzle, scope caps or lens protection, basic cleaning Kit, lubricant/rust prevention, etc.

    3.) Find an over-the-counter ammunition loading that is both accurate with a bullet that is constructed for purpose. Practice w/ it! If you need more ammo once you arrive - it'll likely be here on stocking dealer's shelves.

    4.) Make sure your iron sights are dead-nuts on and reliable. You have 'em may as well be able to depend on them for back-up.

    5.) Your scope can be as simple as a good weatherproof 4x to some variable. I'd go 1.5-5x or 3-9x, picking a brand of reputation w/ lifetime waranty. Reasonings being --- IDing Moose a little easier, with the likely possibilities of brush-bustin' to open country visability.

    6.) Going beyond a bit... I think it is important HOW you go about mouting the scope!!!! I feel this is very key!!! I'd use a one piece picatinny rail as a base that allows you to select where the rings and scope can be situated on your gun. This system is better than having only a couple cross slots or none at all on many 2 piece bases. Works perfect with re-zeroing QD Leupold or Warne rings should you ever take the scope off and on.

    Hope this gives ya some good insight... enjoy -

    Brian Richardson

  7. #7
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    Default

    That sounds lika a very good plan.
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  8. #8
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    Default

    I have done a lot of float hunting and what I have found is that you will be treed and shaded areas late in the evening. This will require a scope that picks up lot of light, I us a Zeiss 3x9x40.

    What we did is get up in the morning early then go and walk and set up and hunt. Come back get something to eat pack up and start floating then around 4pm starting looking for a good spot to get out make camp and do the evening hunt.

  9. #9

    Default any firearm

    I guess the Remington pumps and autos are sound but I think anything that you carry should be able to be torn down fast and easy , that's why Mausers are it for me in a bolt and Marlins in a lever . I've always thought a fast shooting Whelen would be great , but it has to function in tough situations .

  10. #10
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    Default

    Leupold. Done.

  11. #11
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    Default Scope

    I'll second that - Leupold!!!

  12. #12
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    Default

    I've had 2 7600's in 35whelen and the first sported a vari-x3 1.5x5 and the 2nd a vx2 2x7. I'd go with either one again in a heartbeat.

    The 7600 isnt a benchrest gun so keep it simple.

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