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Thread: Case trimming

  1. #1
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    Default Case trimming

    I have been reloading rifles for years and have just recently started loading pistol. My question is do you need to trim your cases for revolvers everytime? Our if they are close are your ok? I have folks telling me either way is ok. I know for rifle I do it everytime, since I want the most accurate round possible. Any info/direction would be very much appreciated.

  2. #2

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    From the standpoint of crimping, it's a good idea to have your handgun cases all the same length, especially for roll crimping revolver rounds. For general purpose and plinking I doubt you would notice a great difference if there was a little variation, but for high precision shooting, I'd definitely trim regularly. Most shooters don't shoot well enough to notice a difference, but I'll take any edge I can get.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    From the standpoint of crimping, it's a good idea to have your handgun cases all the same length, especially for roll crimping revolver rounds. For general purpose and plinking I doubt you would notice a great difference if there was a little variation, but for high precision shooting, I'd definitely trim regularly. Most shooters don't shoot well enough to notice a difference, but I'll take any edge I can get.
    I agree with BrownBear, that for plinking you would not notice a great difference if there was some variation. I believe that one should trim his revolver or pistol brass regularly if he wants top accuracy. Most don't shoot often enough or practice enough to know the difference. As said above, most shooters do not shoot well enough to benefit from the trimming regularly and because of that they think it is not necessary. If you want top accuracy it is a good habit to get into.
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  4. #4
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    Thanks, thatís what I was thinking all along. I do go for accuracy as every little bit helps and will trim all my cases for the revolver. Experience/advice from others is always great, Thanks again.

  5. #5

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    As your cases age, keep your eye open for little tiny splits at the case mouth. Brass work hardens and becomes brittle, with the case mouth getting the worst of it. How fast that happens depends on how much you bell the case mouths for bullet seating, along with how heavy a crimp you apply, especially with roll crimps. I expect to start seeing some after 6-8 reloads of full power loads, depending on the details I just mentioned.

    I bring it up, because you are most likely to notice the small cracks while case trimming, but can obscure them if you're trimming a lot.

    As a rule of thumb, I only load cases 4 times with full power loads before either retiring them into use for low power loads or annealing them to resoften the brass at the case mouth. But if you shoot them once the small cracks develop, they're going to come out of the chamber with big cracks.

    It's also well worth keeping your brass segregated by age and keeping track of how many times you have fired each batch. Be sure to label the boxes or whatever other container you use, because it's easy to lose track when you have lots of batches sitting around.

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