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Thread: Is my Rifle OK to shoot?

  1. #1

    Default Is my Rifle OK to shoot?

    Ill try to keep it short.
    My model 700 remington 300 ultra mag got somewhat rusty before deer season. I decided I wanted it parkerized but opted to shoot a few deer with it first. Then I took it apart and cleaned the rust out and got ready to ship it. Unfortunately, I changed my mind and want to use it for the rest of the season.
    Here is the problem. When I put the rifle back together. The cartridge seemed to big for the chamber. It is like the chamber shrunk in size or something. It would not even fit all the way unless I used exessive force. Anyway, I sand blasted inside the chamber and now the case fits again. Do you think my rifle is safe to shoot?

  2. #2

    Default

    I'll try to be nice!

    I have bead blasted several guns in my day and the first thing I do is plug both ends of the barrel so as not bead blast into the chamber or the end of the barrel.

    Bead blasting roughens the surface and sandblasting will roughen the surface to a greater extent (depending on the sand).

    You no doubt had a small amount of rust in the chamber that prevented the shell from chambering. A chamber brush and some good oil would have been the correct way to remove the rust...or you could sandblast it. However there is a good chance that the chamber walls are now rougher than a cob from the sandblasting. At firing the case will expand to match the contour of the a walls. Since this is the first time that I have ever heard of this happening I can't give you a for sure answer as to what will happen when the gun is fired. There is a chance that the fireformed case will stick in the chamber.

    If your gun was sitting there with the bolt closed and the chamber got rusty then more than likely the full length of the barrel is rusty as well. As the shell had a hard time fitting into the chamber the bullet will also be fighting much friction getting out the tube. This could mean some high chamber pressure problems if fired. I would wear out a couple of bore brushes using a good penetrating oil followed by dry patches until the patches came out rust free before I would concider firing the gun.

    As for firing the gun....I would tie a string on the trigger and fire it from a distance the first time. A 300 Ultra generates lots of hot gases and if some of them decide to come rearward then it best not to be hanning onto it when it happens. I really doubt that this will happen but who knows?

    Or...........you could send it off to Remington. They will not take any risk, if it even looks in question to them then your gun will come back with a new tube and a bill for a couple hundred bucks if your lucky.

    I gotta say it.... How in the hell could you let your gun get this rusty? Fifty cents worth of oil would have prevented it. I have owned over a thousand guns in my time and never had this happen!

  3. #3
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    Default

    Hey, when you leave then lying in the bottom of the boat, it doesn't take to long.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  4. #4

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    Boy, I don't know what to say. I've never thought of sandblasting a chamber, and I sure don't like the sound of it. As EKC says, there are lots of clues that other problems are lurking.

    Will it go bang when you pull the trigger? Almost certainly.

    Is it likely to blow up? I doubt it.

    Will it shoot worth a darn? I doubt it even more, and what's the point of taking an ultra on a deer hunt if it isn't accurate enough for long range work?

    Send it off to Remington. Short of that, take it to a good local smith. In either case, get out your wallet, because you are going to pay for neglecting it.

  5. #5
    Member RainGull's Avatar
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    Default

    I would take some flitz to the chamber and polish it up a bit with a drill or some such and then take a casting of the chamber and look for and measure for any problem areas. If it looks good I would fire a reduced load and then try to extract the case with little force (don't damage the case or the rifle) if you have to tap down the barrel with a cleaning rod while opening the bolt that would be fine. Then I would measure the fired case and check it out really good. If no problems I would fire a normal load and repeat the process. Then if you have no problems, fire it on paper and check for accuracy.

    Either way I would guess your done for the season with that rifle.
    Science has a rich history of proving itself wrong.

  6. #6
    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    Default

    Well, looking at the excellent suggestions recomended here, its hard to offer better advise. the one thing that I might add is this: by the time you get done messing around with trying to salvage your barrel, your hunting season will likely be long over. You may want to consider stacking your 300 ultra mag in the back of the closet and head down to one of the gun shops in search of a cheap used rifle to get you thru the rest of the season. Then you can decide what to do about your "project" gun........and for that one, it sure sounds like a different barrel is in order. You may get lucky and find a take off on Gunbroker.com or one of the other auction sites that will work for what you want, at reasonable expense.

  7. #7
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    Default Aurghh!!!

    Well, I'd say the barrel is a lost cause, first due to rust then due to sandblasting. Did you blat the barrel also?

    I'm with EKC on this...prevention was the smartest and cheapest way out of this. Even if a gun is Parkerized or coated the inside of the barrel will not be or if so the coating will be shot out and the barrel will still require some means of care to prevent rusting. This one is gone.
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  8. #8
    Member MARV1's Avatar
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    This is classic, lol. Sorry.
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by MARV1 View Post
    This is classic, lol. Sorry.
    Seems like we all know somebody that has done something bone-headed along these lines. Live and learn
    You know you aren't really having fun until you ask yourself -how much is this going to cost me?

  10. #10

    Default sand blasted chamber

    If you can chamber a cartridge and extract the case after firing with no problem and if your fired brass dimension are o.k. and if your primers look o.k. then don't worry about it , it was not the thing to do but if it shoots and functions and is accurate let it go .

  11. #11

    Default Lever user

    Are you advising him to just shoot it and see what happens?

    10 psi over can blow a primer! Some of the blown primers I've experienced weren't pleasant!

    What happens if the bore is so rusty that the chamber pressure is say 100 PSI or more?
    Will the bolt hold together? Most likely....most likely ain't good enough for me. Never had it happen but picking metal out of your face can't be fun. I wouldn't risk it! Tie a string on the trigger!!!

  12. #12
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default shoot?

    The gentleman's question was...was his rifle safe to shoot...not what to look for AFTER he pulled the trigger...but if he elects to do the latter I would second the string idea...might I add a looooong string! Seriously, I would recommend having a gun smith that you trust have a look at it - may be nothing and if so you are only out a few bucks...the alternative is prob not acceptable.....don't forget "Murphy".

  13. #13
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    Default Probably safe to shot

    It's hard to believe that you could sand blast enough metal to make the gun unsafe to shoot. Remingtons generally have pretty tight chambers to start any way. If you would have had enought rust to significantly enlarge the chamber the bolt and trigger assembly would most likely be inoperative also.

    Extraction and accuracy are anothe matter but I'd bet that the gun will shoot just fine with acceptable accuracy.

  14. #14
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    Maybe the problem isn't with the chamber.

    Is the ejector or extractor rusted?

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  15. #15
    Member AKGUPPY's Avatar
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    Default

    Sandblasted the chamber. ***? Where did you find that tip?

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