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Thread: frozen battery

  1. #1

    Default frozen battery

    I have to keep my 4wheeler outside. Will keeping a 2 amp trickle charger battery companion on the battery keep it from freezing or not. If not what should i do to keep it from freezing. The reason I ask is the key was left turned on went to charge the battery had to bring it in to thaw before it would charge.

  2. #2
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    Default

    Kinda a pain in the butt but pull it and keep it inside. If you want to ride, it will take a few minutes but just throw it back in. Thats usually what I do, this year I shoved both machines in the garage and the truck is outside.

  3. #3

    Default plowing

    I have to be able to plow snow and the wife takes the kid to the bus stop on it when the road is icy

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    I see your point now, they make battery warmers (wrap around blanket) that you have to plug in that will keep the battery warm. It will cost a few bucks but you wont have to worry about it freezing up.

  5. #5
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Yes, they make battery minder trickle chargers that will do the job. The battery will not freeze if it is kept fully charged.

  6. #6
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    If any battery ever was frozen it might as well toss it away as it is toast. It will never hold a charge.
    That being said if you wish to leave it outside make sure it is fully charged and then disconnect the negative terminal. This will keep the battery from draining.
    Tennessee

  7. #7
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    Default Battery Warmer

    I'm not sure if a battery blanket would work? Is your battery in a box (like under the seat the way Honda does it?) or is it kinda' out there, exposed (like Polaris puts em under the plastic, left rear?). A blanket may work if it's just hanging out underneath like Polaris, but if it's in it's own compartment a battery blanket may be too big to fit. If you get the pads, be careful! The ones designed for car batteries my be too big to fit as well, but may crinkle up the sides of the box some & work. DON'T get an oil pan heater by mistake! They look very similar to the battery pads (I think they're a little smaller, thus more tempting for the smaller ATV batteries), but get much hotter - you can potentially boil your battery with one.
    You can also build a shed. Even an unheated shed will make a world of difference, until it gets -30.

  8. #8

    Default

    The best thing to do is to pull the battery and leave it in your garage, there is no other alternative. I work all kinds of different batteries for a living and i've seen just about everything. If you leave that battery in your machine and it gets extremely cold (and you know it will) your battery will crack, seen it way to many times. Disconnecting the leads from it won't save anything unless your having a problem with the battery draining for reasons other than cold. A battery blanket could work if you can find the right size.

  9. #9
    mriguy
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    Default Rhino Battery....

    I use my Rhino to plow snow too. I live in North Pole and keep my Rhino outside. I use a trickle charger and put the smallest heating pad under it I could find. NAPA sells all different sizes. Put a plug in just like my truck. It always cranks up more than enough to fire.

    2 pointers...

    First, use a Battery Tender. They simply are the best. Second, remember the size of the heating pad isn't the most important thing to remember; it's the WATTAGE. find one with the lowest amount of watts and you'll be fine.

    And it doesn't hurt to install a second battery like I did!

  10. #10
    Member Crumm's Avatar
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    Like stated above once a battery is frozen it is junk. A charged battery will not freeze but a dead one will. Heating pads do give the battery more cold cranking amps but they also reduce the life of the battery. Heat kills battery's. Ask someone in Arizona how long there car battery's last and you will find that they go through twice as many as Alaskans. I have the original battery in a 1995 Ford Explorer and a 1996 F350. These battery's have never had warming pads or trickle chargers on them and are still going strong after 12+ years. You may find that after a evening of plowing that your battery will be a little low from running the winch so a charge would be in order. Heating or charging 24/7 will do nothing but decrease the life expectancy.

  11. #11
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Never heard that

    Quote Originally Posted by Crumm View Post
    ...Heating or charging 24/7 will do nothing but decrease the life expectancy.
    Trickle charging is the only way I keep my old battery alive. What is the basis for saying trickle charging decreases battery life? Not disputing, just wondering.

  12. #12

    Default

    sayak, he didn't say "trickle charging" will decrease battery life, he said charging it will and there is a difference. It's all in the amount of amps your using to charge the battery. Once a battery is fully charged it should draw less amps but WILL continue to charge. Constant charging of a battery will cause it to get hot and it getting hot will cause it to gas and boil off your electrolyte level. When you have a battery that is low on water overcharging is usually the reason why it's low or because of it's age. Once a battery gets close to zero volts you will be doing good to recover it. Kind of long winded there but I thought i'd throw that out there for general knowledge.

  13. #13
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Thanks

    I guess I read "trickle" into it. Couldn't imagine anyone charging a battery all the time with a regular charger I guess.

  14. #14
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    If your tricker charger measure over 13.8 v (not connect to battery)and you leave on your battery 24/7, it will kill your battery.

    I agree 110% with Crumm, extream good information.

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rutting Moose View Post
    If your tricker charger measure over 13.8 v (not connect to battery)and you leave on your battery 24/7, it will kill your battery.

    I agree 110% with Crumm, extream good information.
    RM, your post is kinda confusing.

    chuckr, try one of these battery tenders, you can leave it hooked up when your not riding it and your battery should be just fine.

    http://batterytender.com/default.php...0322bff14ae412

  16. #16
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    Default

    AkHunter45:

    I donít understand why youíre confused, if you read the BatteryTender web site under.
    Why Battery Tender:
    ē (Fully Automatic: At the end of the regular charger cycle, every Battery Tender battery charger automatically switches its output voltage to a safe, storage or float level that eliminates the need to constantly check on the conditions of the battery.)
    I would think the storage or float level (voltage) is below 13.8V.

  17. #17
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    I just disconnet the negative terminal from the batteries on my toys (atv's, rv' motorcycles, boats etc). and leave them sit in the vehicle. The RV I owned prior had 7 winters on the batteries and they were still fine. The key is to disconnect them while they are fully charged.
    Your mileage may vary but I been happy with the results. My boat batteries have seen three seasons and still work well but I have a 3 year rule on boats.
    Now the one time I didnt disconnect the starting battery on my RV is was discharged and frozen solid within two months (expensive lesson).
    I dont even bother reconnecting the batteries and starting them up any more during storage. They seem to be fine with 7 months of inactivity each season.
    The gentleman at the battery shop that used to be on 5th Ave in Anchorage but have since moved told me they will last longer if they are stored disconnected and cold. His advise seems to be working for me.
    Tennessee

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    Default

    also never store a charged battery on a concrete floor.

  19. #19
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    If the battery is charged it won't freeze. If it is draining while sitting you have a short in something and need to get it fixed. For this reason I would store the battery inside till you get the short fixed. 12 vehicles sitting in my yard, all with batteries, in 37 years only had one freeze, radio got left on drained the battery.

  20. #20
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    Most vehicles have what I heard called "parasitic drains". The electronics will always drain a small amount of current to keep the radio presets, clock up to date, etc
    It is not much of a drain but it will drain a battery over a month or two. That is why I disconnect the negative terminal, not because of a "short" in the system.
    Cheers
    Tennessee

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