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Thread: Gun Safes and moving them

  1. #1
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    Default Gun Safes and moving them

    I wanted to get a couple of new safes to replace the metal boxes I been using for gun storage but I was wondering,

    How in the heck do you guys get a 550 pound safe down a flight of stairs and into position? I have a dolly on wheels but man these new safes are heavy!
    Tennessee

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    I believe they have a battery assisted dolley that can descend a flight of steps.An old friend from "Neils lock and safe" used one once.Pretty neat.....

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    Randy,

    I have used the dolliea to move mine and it really puts a load on the tires but I didnt blow any. I have also tipped it on its back and slid it on cardboard with some friends (they are pretty good size guys). I've only had to move mine down stairs at one place we lived in, thats where the big friends come in, sliding it down the stairs. getting it out cost me alot of beer to con them to help out again.

    When I sell the place I'm in now, its probably gonna stay here.

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    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    Randy, tow it down the stairs with your King Quad

    I have avoided buying one for the simple reason that we are outgrowning out current house and will be in the market for someting bigger........and I sure as hell dont want to have to move a safe!

    Years ago, a good friend bought an antique safe at a farm auction. This thing was about 4 feet square and I remember looking at the door, and it was at least 6 inches thick, as were all the sides, top and bottom. We used an Allis Chalmers tractor with a bucket to hoist it out of the truck and set it up on his deck that we had lined with 3/4 ply wood. Naturally my buddy lived in a double wide trailer and figured once we got it into the trailer it would just roll accros the floor on its tinly little cast iron wheels to where ever it was he was going to put it...............everything went great until half way accross the living room floor when those little wheels punched thru the floor and the safe sat flush on the lanolium Shortly there after, as we disgussed what sort of tool we would need to pry the thing up enough to get some plywood under it, we were informed by his wife that we were in fact "tool's" and that if the safe wasnt removed from its current position within an hour, she was going to chain us to it and dump it into the river Years later I asked him what ever happened to the safe, and he said, when I sold the trailer the new owners wife loved the antique safe and asked if he could purchase it..........My friend told him that it was a very valuable family piece that had passed thru many generations, but he could possible convice his wife to part with it for $200. The new owner was most pleased and forked over the cash, and my friend told me, heck............to tell the truth, I would have PAID the guy double that, just to keep the stupid thing!

    Safes, pianos and freezers............got to love em! hate to move em!

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    I pulled mine out of the truck and up the steps with a come-a-long. I slid it through the door and onto a upside down piece of carpet. Where it sat for a couple days until some friends could come help. The carpet slid real nice on the hardwood floor, standing it up and getting it the last couple feet into position was exercise!

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    I have a browning medallion weighs 710 pounds, and one way to get it down without scratching is lay it on its back, wrap a nylon harness around it and lower with a Come-along (Winch),be sure to lay down lots of old padding or moving blankets I've had the this safe moved four different times being in the Air force, this is also done with just me and the wife. The paint gets a little rubbed but, rubbing compound buffs it right out...K

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    Some buddy's and I move 2 in one day. We were able to remove One door ( 2x4 fulcrum & lever from bottom lift up) made it lighter.Otherwise we put them on a dollie, laid them back on ripped ply sheets and slide them down or pushed them up the stairs. Had to go both ways!! Between the 3 of us it was still a chore.

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    Default safe

    I moved my 750# Heritage safe a number of times. When I purchased it, the company I bought it from moved it into my home down a flight of stairs (about 7 steps) with one of those Powermate stair climbing hand trucks. That was sort of scary, but it did work. It was easier getting it back out. Perhaps a carpenter could chime in, but putting that much weight on a stair case concerns me.

    A couple of moves later, I'm settled in and the safe stays in the garage. It would be nice to have it in the house, but it's too much hastle.

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    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default Of course...

    ...put them in the garage on the concrete floor. Once they are filled with guns and with the weight of the safe - it's not going anywhere. Besides, I have always been concerned re: all the weight and the possible long term consequences on the floor joists and other house structural components.

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    Default Safe Move

    Although 500 pounds isn't light, 2 or 3 guys can move a safe down a flight of stairs without too much trouble. They are hard to find, but a motorized stair climber (Escalera or Steprider) is what you need. If you cannot find one, a beefy appliance dollie will do. Have 2 people on the top side and one below to slow momentum, BUT ON THE SIDE. If the staircase is wide enough, pick the safe up on its front as the door is the heaviest part. This helps keep the weight on you and the safe from going over (much more of a concern if picking it up on its side). The key is to keep the weight down on the stair tread instead of laying the safe down too much as the wheels will want to take off. If you go the hand dollie route, make sure it has a strap for attaching the safe to it and belts designed to ride on the stairs. This will create friction and slow the decent. This is assuming carpet on the stairs, but if not, I would hire a professional! Here are a couple pics of my companies climbers and a couple moves to inspire you. The one going up the curved stairs is 1200# and the outside staircase is a 2000# Fort Knox Yeager Series that we picked up on its end (41") and landed it on a 48" platform. That one was not fun.

    Good Luck,

    Wyatt








  11. #11

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    One can rent heavy duty refrigerator dollys from the rental store. Empty the safe, use the strap and use two strong people. Stay upstairs and dont get below the thing. I have done it. One step at time, as they have a stair walker on them.

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    I used an extension ladder laid on the steps as a skid surface, put a piece of 3/4 plywood on top of the ladder, put the safe on top of the plywood, used a come along attached to a doubled 2x4 across an adjacent doorway at the top. I was bringing it up but I don't see why it wouldn't work going down.

    On the flat, cut about 3 pieces of 1 1/2" PVC just a bit wider than the safe and just roll it on them, someone keep putting the free piece in front.

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    Default On flat ground

    When you get it to level ground, just use 2 pieces of schedule 80 pipe. If you use more, you have to tip the safe back too much. Roll the safe as far as you can, let it rock back on the one piece, place the second one under and continue on until the first one comes out the other end. Pushing low and with your knee will make the safe go farther each rotation. Also however you place the roller will dictate where the safe tracks. If you need to go around a corner, put the pipe just under the safe corner at about 30 degrees and the safe will track perfectly!

    Wyatt

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    Member IceKing02's Avatar
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    Default Don't kill your stairs or your back...

    Put it in the garage. There is less fuel for a long burn if it sits in the garage, anyways. Those safes hold firearms, jewelry, valuable documents and cash--there's no good reason to let it all burn up after 20-40minutes while the men in firetrucks are putting out the flames of your house. Its the same reason to keep it out of the basement--most safes aren't fully waterproof and there is no reason to let your valuables get water up to the action if a sump pump fails...

    Just my 2cents after having seen how easy it would be to put a safe from the back of my truck to my garage.

    IceKing02

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    Default long time mover

    Yes, you can do it yourself, but call up a couple of moving companies and see what 2 men and a truck will cost. Normally they are hourly, time out of the shop to time bak. I would expect to pay roughly $100/hour. You can use 2 guys if you help out.
    Using a moving company places liability on them, and protects you and your friends. No, I am not in the moving business now, and if I had a safe to move, because of my experience, I would do it myself. But I have moved everything from Concert Grand Pianos to Lord knows what all up and down places that they never should have been taken just because somebody thought it would be fun to see some guys sweat like crazy.
    If you are going down stairs, think about using a deadman at the top to lower the safe with. A hitch on the truck and a heavy rope works well. Do not use a regular hand truck or dolly.
    Sometimes moving companies will rent out equipment. Measure the length of the stairs and the width to see if a walkboard will fit. That will protect the stairs. Pictured earlier is a silver appliance dolly. Moving companies may have those too.
    If the stairs are open on the bottom, inspect them for cracks or damage that might be a problem. A quick way to beef them up is with a pallet. Just stand it on edge and wedge it in to place.

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    Are you guys serious about putting a safe in a garage? Maybe its a joke... but the comments about putting a safe in a garage remind me of a Jeff Foxworthy song that might end with the words "Here's your sign!". This is just wrong on so many different levels.

    Take all of your most valuable things and put them in a single container that easily fits in the back of a truck, put that container in a place that when a 9 foot door is open it is visible from the outside of the house, maybe even visible to public access areas, place that container in the same room where you store all your great and powerful tools, probably the same place that you would choose to take a safe if you needed to break into it, a place that is meant to hide a 4 wheel drive pickup backed up to the safe. A vehicle could pull it from any concievable anchoring in the garage. Unless you enclose it completely in concrete there is no way to protect it from a vehicle hooking up to it or any kind of framing around it and just rip it down.

    Not sure where you live but when I park my vehicles in the garage in the wintertime probably 20-30 pounds of crud falls off if it every night. The crud is a mixture of semi-frozen ice, road grit, and calcium. This falls off because the calcium dissolves it and the heat of the vehicle heats it a little. If the garage is heated of course it will also melt. If the garage is not heated then anything you take out of the safe and into the house will condensate. Paper stuff will be quickly ruined with mildew and anything metal risks getting rusty. I know I don't want to go out into a cold garage to retrieve valuables. Everything metal in my garage is on blocks and the bottoms still rust a lot.

    If you put your safe in a place that was easy for you then it will also be just as easy for someone to remove it, and the point of a safe in the first place is to prevent these kinds of things from happening. If you put it in a god awful place then that alone will be a deterrent when it is found. Seems like there are a lot of scenarios where someone may see a safe in a garage. Use the same logic that businesses use to protect their valuables.

    Nobody sees my safe or even know I have it unless I want them to. I really doubt that anyone would ever attempt to move it unless they have tools from the garage and want to spend a few hours of a lot of frustration. My greatest fear is that they will take my oxy-acetyl equipment from the garage and bring it up to the safe. Regarding fire, most safes are fire rated for some period of time. You cant protect anything 100%.

    Maybe all this writing is for naught as it was meant as a joke! If not, Here's your sign!

  17. #17
    Member IceKing02's Avatar
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    Default Then why buy a safe in the first place?

    Ed M,

    If you want to keep your valuables out of sight and mind, why not just build a safe room? We had these all over in Oklahoma to keep our valuables and our families safe--especially since there were so many tornadoes...they're made of steel-reinforced concrete and are not too expensive to build.

    I agree with your point that it is just as easy to remove a safe as it would be to put it in place, BUT: They're going to need a hydraulic lift and a 1-ton truck just to get it moved...that many people wanting to steal my stuff are probably going to be well-armed and highly motivated. Most criminals aren't into that much work--that's why they're criminals! If they really want what is inside they can go for it--if the darn thing weighs over 2200lbs. with all of my crap inside and 500lbs. of lead in the bottom then who the heck is going to come over and just throw it in the back of their truck?

    Maybe my perspective on a safe and its use is a little different. I view it as a decent place to keep my stuff out of the easy reach of unscrupulous individuals. It affords reasonable protection from fire and it allows easy access for me to transfer weapons from the safe to my vehicle. My safe is in an extra bay of my garage which is probably more of a shop than a garage, really. Its my advice that if you're really worried that one of your neighbors is going to steal your stuff then you hire a moving company for you and your family, not for your safe...here's YOUR sign for staying in that neighborhood! Hee, hee!

    IceKing02

    The things you own end up owning you. It's only after you lose everything that you're free to do anything. ~Fight Club

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