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Thread: Folbot Greenland II?

  1. #1
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    Default Folbot Greenland II?

    Has anyone owned/used one? What do you think?

    How long would one last with proper care?

    Pro's and Cons vs a nice 2-man fiberglass kayak?

    Are they slow in the water? Hard to pack a lot of gear in? Unstable? Flimsy?

    I'm considering the Greenland II because it's only $2800 with the expedition package and it only weighs 65lbs. 95% of my kayaking is done in Prince William Sound. My buddy has a boat for drop offs, but it's not feasable to strap a 2-person fiberglass kayak to his boat (28' Bayliner w/ flybridge).

    Also, I could easily throw a Greenland II in an airplane to use on fly out hunting trips to lakes and I could even take it on a commercial plane on my trips to visit family in Utah and Ketchikan.

    Does this sound like a good buy for me, or should I look elsewhere for a good 2-man kayak?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    I'm not a very experienced kayaker, so take this advice with a grain of salt.

    My mother has two Folbot kayaks and I have borrowed them quite a bit. While the 1-man version is a bit tippy, the Greenland II (that's the two-person model, right?) is extremely stable. She used it in a kayak class, and the instructor constantly remarked at how stable it was. In fact, she and her partner really struggled to intentionally capsize it for their rescue training.

    They are slower than fiberglass kayaks, but what you lose in speed you gain in stability and convenience. It is nice to be able to throw the two bags into the back of my truck, whereas I would have to buy a special roof rack to transport a fiberglass boat. I also have plans to take it over to Lake Clark via airplane, but haven't done so yet. The bags are a bit bulky, but nothing too bad.

    So far they have proved to be very durable and reliable. We did break one small plastic part, but it hasn't affected the performance of the boat.

    If speed isn't a primary concern, I'd get it!

  3. #3

    Default

    We owned a Klepper Aerius II, which is a similar boat. Selling it was dumb, and I've regretted it since. The Folbots have a similar reputation for quality, although I'd buy a Klepper again if I had the $$$ for it.

    Figure out which of these is more important to you:

    1. Having a flexible boat (the pun is intentional) that you can use anywhere you'd like to paddle (short of whitewater), with even more initial stability than some rigid tandem hulls.

    2. Having a faster, more efficient hull. Keep this in mind if you're regularly going to be traveling in the company of other rigid boats.

    Personally, I would always choose the folding boat for AK. The rigid hull people often think that's nuts, even while they avert their gaze from the maps and ignore that little voice asking, "What if . . ."

  4. #4
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    Default

    my step brother paddles them quite a bit and has done some expedition trips in them and loves them. He says they are much better rough water boats than most of his rigid hulls. They also will take a pretty good size payload. I think that Greenland 11 your looking at has somewhere in the neighboorhood of 600 lbs. I have been looking at buying one also. Longhaul Folding Kayaks makes an updated version of the Klepper and was a Klepper repar facility. They also have great deals on kayaks from time to time on thier website. Paddling.net has a buyer guide and a users review section that is quite expansive.

  5. #5
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    Default thumbs up

    my step brother paddles them quite a bit and has done some expedition trips in them and loves them. He says they are much better rough water boats than most of his rigid hulls. They also will take a pretty good size payload. I think that Greenland 11 your looking at has somewhere in the neighboorhood of 600 lbs. I have been looking at buying one also. Longhaul Folding Kayaks makes an updated version of the Klepper and was a Klepper repar facility. They also have great deals on kayaks from time to time on thier website. Paddling.net has a buyer guide and a users review section that is quite expansive.

  6. #6

    Default feathercraft

    If you want to check out a really nice H/D folding kayak. Look at feathercraft.com made in Canada and bomb proof.
    They are, in my opinion, they best on the market.
    Goo

  7. #7
    Member AK_Kid's Avatar
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    May 2006
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    Default

    I dig mine, buddy. The only disadvantages are speed and set-up/take-down.

    You also need to rinse the saltwater off after each use, which sometimes means unpacking, spraying, and hanging to dry when you get home.

    Wait until after our June trip. We'll paddle her around, and you can decide if you're interested thereafter.

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